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Hundreds gathered at the Capitol steps Tuesday, Feb. 21, to voice their disagreement with Sen. Steve Daines. Daines is being accused by the protesters of not listening to the citizens of Montana.
Freddy Monares - UM Legislative News Service

Protesters Give Sen Daines An Earful At The State Capitol

Just before U.S. Senator Steve Daines was scheduled to give a speech in front of Montana lawmakers Tuesday afternoon, a crowd of protesters gathered on the Capitol steps. The event was organized by a Facebook group called "Bring The Town Hall to Steve Daines".

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Threshold Episode 03: Born Free

Many cattle ranchers view wild bison as a threat to their livelihoods. But some think cattle and bison can coexist. On episode three of Threshold , you'll meet two cattle ranchers with different perspectives on wild bison — and, we'll take you on a controversial bison hunt.

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That's No Flea - It's a Snow Fly

When I’m out in the woods in winter, I tend to keep my eyes on the ground. I’m looking for tracks, scat - signs of warm-blooded life. About the last thing I’d expect to see is an insect. But a few weeks ago, on a ski up at Lolo Pass, that was exactly what I found – and not just one insect; dozens.

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Bring your lunch to the Myrna Loy Center in Helena and chat with MTPR station manager Ray Ekness and program director Michael Marsolek.  Please come, ask questions and give us your advice and suggestions about the station. Ray and Michael will also let you know what projects MTPR has in the pipeline.

Today we're celebrating 52 years of Montana Public Radio! For our birthday wish this year, we're asking you to share your most memorable "driveway moment." Tell us about a time when you just couldn't pull yourself away from the radio. Don't have a "driveway moment?" Tell us why public radio matters to you.

Each season, Threshold podcast explores one story from the natural world, and what it says about us. Season one focuses on the American bison. Dig into the history of the American bison, from their arrival in North America, to current controversies surrounding their management today. 

Subscribe to Threshold podcast now via iTunes, and most other podcast apps, or using your own player: http://thresholdpodcast.libsyn.com/rss. You can also listen online at http://www.thresholdpodcast.org

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Senator Daines' Speech To Montana's Legislature

40 minutes ago
Sen. Steve Daines
Courtesy photo

This transcript of U.S. Senator Steve Daines’ remarks as prepared for delivery was provided by his staff.

Nakoda Sky People is a compilation of poems from several of Allen’s smaller collections, and also contains a lexicon of Nakoda words and phrases as well as pages of Native recipes and herbal medicines.

In an introductory essay to Nakoda Sky People, Minerva Allen states directly, “We keep our history and culture alive by telling of our ancestors and legends to young people.”  She tells of learning the Assiniboine way of life from her grandparents, and now she feels a duty to pass along what she knows. 

The Republican House majority refused to bring a bill to the floor for debate that would give legal recourse to LGBTQ individuals in cases of discrimination.  House Bill 417 would have added sexual orientation and gender identity or expression to Montana’s Human Rights Act.


Flags across Montana flew at half-staff Tuesday in honor of Montana’s first female Supreme Court Chief Justice, Karla Gray. Gray died Sunday in Helena of cancer. She was 69-years-old.

Bill Could Exempt Outdoor Seasonal Workers From Overtime, Minimum Wage

19 hours ago

HELENA -- Montana lawmakers heard testimony on House Bill 496 Tuesday that would add seasonal outdoor recreation employees to a list of people who wouldn't necessarily be eligible for minimum wage or overtime pay.

Glacier National Park Entrance At St. Mary
Flicker user GlacierNPS (CC-BY-2.0)

The National Park Service learned yesterday that seasonal employees for the agency have been deemed exempt from a federal hiring freeze. 

Hundreds gathered at the Capitol steps Tuesday, Feb. 21, to voice their disagreement with Sen. Steve Daines. Daines is being accused by the protesters of not listening to the citizens of Montana.
Freddy Monares - UM Legislative News Service

Just before U.S. Senator Steve Daines was scheduled to give a speech in front of Montana lawmakers Tuesday afternoon, a crowd of protesters gathered on the Capitol steps.

The event was organized by a Facebook group called "Bring The Town Hall to Steve Daines".

Last week, both of Montana’s senators held virtual town-hall meetings to connect with constituents. Questions ranged from Trump’s pick for Secretary of Education, to the Affordable Care Act and Russia.

Legislature Debates Tax Increases For Wealthy Montanans
(PD)

A Democratic lawmaker from Bozeman is proposing a tax increase on the wealthy to make up for shortfalls in state budget.

Bozeman Democratic Representative Zach Brown
Montana legislature

The sponsor of a bill that would mandate limits on opioid prescriptions in Montana now says he’s willing to abandon that idea at the request of physicians in the state.

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NPR News

Four newly discovered frog species are so tiny that they can sit comfortably on a fingernail, making them some of the smallest-known frogs in the world.

Scientists said in a video that they were "surprised to find that the miniature forms are in fact locally abundant and fairly common." The frogs likely escaped notice until now because of their tiny size and secretive habitats, hidden under damp soil or dense vegetation.

Reform groups in Mexico have been trying for years to persuade politicians to regularly disclose their assets and incomes, pointing to their northern neighbor as an example of a place where financial disclosure is the norm in government.

Then came President Trump, who has steadfastly refused to release his tax returns.

During a sentencing hearing in Texas two decades ago, a defense attorney for a man named Duane Buck called on an expert who said his client's race made it more statistically likely that he would commit violent crimes in the future.

Because of that statement, the Supreme Court has ruled 6-2 that Buck, who is black, can appeal his death sentence.

It's the latest development in a case that Chief Justice John Roberts describes as "a perfect storm" of circumstances that he says culminated in a lower court "making a decision on life or death on the basis of race."

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

While trying to catch a bus to school, Emilio Mayfield, 16, jaywalked. When he didn't comply with a police officer's command to get out of the bus lane, a scuffle ensued. Mayfield was struck in the face with a baton and arrested by nine Stockton, Cal. police officers. The arrest was captured on video by a bystander and the video went viral.

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