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Lucas Grossi helps Odi Pierce into the cat at Great Northern Powder Guides in Olney. Pierce is one of seven extreme adaptive athletes participating in DREAM Adaptive's backcountry powder camp this year.
Nicky Ouellet

Disabled Skiers Hit The Slopes With DREAM Powder Camp

It's peak ski season, and as every powder hound knows, the right equipment is everything on the slopes. "He had a hole in his liner where he was losing suction and his leg was falling off," says Lucas Grossi, volunteer coordinator for DREAM Adaptive Recreation's backcountry powder camp. And yeah, he said his leg keeps falling off.

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Threshold Episode 04: Tatanka Oyate

In episode four of Threshold, we meet Robbie Magnan of the Fort Peck Tribes. He believes his community can prosper in the future by reconnecting with their roots as the Tatanka Oyate — the buffalo people. Magnan has built a quarantine facility that could be an alternative to the Yellowstone bison slaughter, but right now it sits empty while more than a thousand bison are being culled from the herd. Why? We'll learn more about Magnan's vision for bison restoration, and investigate why some people are opposed to it.

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MTPR Features

Purple tea at Lake Missoula Tea Company in Missoula, MT.
Rachel Cramer

Montana Tea Travelers Bring Home The Kenyan Purple

In the world of tea, a new variety is on the cusp of becoming the next big craze. It’s praised for its health benefits — high levels of cancer-fighting antioxidants exceeding even those found from drinking green tea — and its resistance to climate change in Kenya where it was developed. It came onto the market about five years ago, and at the moment, Lake Missoula Tea Company in Missoula, Montana, is one of the only distributors in North America. It's called purple tea, and it might just save Kenya's struggling tea industry.

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Bring your lunch to the Myrna Loy Center in Helena and chat with MTPR station manager Ray Ekness and program director Michael Marsolek.  Please come, ask questions and give us your advice and suggestions about the station. Ray and Michael will also let you know what projects MTPR has in the pipeline.

Today we're celebrating 52 years of Montana Public Radio! For our birthday wish this year, we're asking you to share your most memorable "driveway moment." Tell us about a time when you just couldn't pull yourself away from the radio. Don't have a "driveway moment?" Tell us why public radio matters to you.

Each season, Threshold podcast explores one story from the natural world, and what it says about us. Season one focuses on the American bison. Dig into the history of the American bison, from their arrival in North America, to current controversies surrounding their management today. 

Subscribe to Threshold podcast now via iTunes, and most other podcast apps, or using your own player: http://thresholdpodcast.libsyn.com/rss. You can also listen online at http://www.thresholdpodcast.org

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Bill To Establish Charter Schools Passes Montana House

42 minutes ago
Montana Capitol.
William Marcus

A bill that its sponsor says would provide additional educational opportunities by establishing a public charter schools act passed the House of Representatives on a vote of 55-44 on Monday.

Montana Lawmakers Enter Break With 50 Bills Signed

1 hour ago
Montana Capitol dome
William Marcus

There’s a break on the horizon for lawmakers in Helena, with about 50 bills signed into law so far, and over 500 still in the process.

Former lawmaker and now lobbyist Bob Gilbert of Sidney says after the transmittal break, which happens halfway through every 90-day session, he expects a good bit of concentration on money.

U.S. Capitol
flickr user Tim Evanson (CC-BY-SA-2)

Over a dozen Montanans have now put their names forward as possible replacements for Ryan Zinke's seat in the U.S. House. Here's a list of candidates in the running:

Congressman Ryan Zinke testifying before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee January 17.
CSPAN

The U.S. Senate moved Congressman Ryan Zinke one step closer to becoming secretary of interior in President Trump's administration.

Crews in Whitefish dig at the site where the city water main burst Monday morning on Baker Avenue.
Nicky Ouellet

Fifty homes are still without water after a catastrophic burst to the City of Whitefish’s water main this morning. Parts of Baker Avenue south of downtown remain closed after crews dug up the street to isolate the leak.

Purple tea at Lake Missoula Tea Company in Missoula, MT.
Rachel Cramer

In the world of tea, a new variety is on the cusp of becoming the next big craze. It’s praised for its health benefits — high levels of cancer-fighting antioxidants exceeding even those found from drinking green tea — and its resistance to climate change in Kenya where it was developed. It came onto the market about five years ago, and at the moment, Lake Missoula Tea Company in Missoula, Montana, is one of the only distributors in North America. It's called purple tea, and it might just save Kenya's struggling tea industry.

Lucas Grossi helps Odi Pierce into the cat at Great Northern Powder Guides in Olney. Pierce is one of seven extreme adaptive athletes participating in DREAM Adaptive's backcountry powder camp this year.
Nicky Ouellet

It's peak ski season, and as every powder hound knows, the right equipment is everything on the slopes.

"He had a hole in his liner where he was losing suction and his leg was falling off," says Lucas Grossi, volunteer coordinator for DREAM Adaptive Recreation's backcountry powder camp.

And yeah, he said his leg keeps falling off.

Montana Republican Party
Montana Republican Party

The state legislative session is now more than third of the way finished. At a Republican Party gathering in Kalispell Friday, about 30 party members said they're generally happy with how it's going, as Republicans hold majorities in both the state House and Senate.

The Glacier Country Pachyderm Club spoke with five Flathead Valley Republican legislators on Skype for almost an hour Friday to hear updates on their bills.

'Wooden'

12 hours ago
Kate Brady

by Jennifer Finley

When you feel like a block of wood
when you used to be a branch whipping
up after a lump of snow slid off you,
what are you supposed to do?

You can't become a tree again. You
can't reattach yourself to where you
came from. Yet, you share the same
bark and pulp.

'The Food Guys' Recommend A Sugar Substitute

Feb 24, 2017
Edgar 181

The Food Guys discus the sugar alcohol, erythritol, which is virtually calorie-free and doesn't cause as large a blood sugar spike as sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup.

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NPR News

Attorney General Jeff Sessions pledged to devote federal resources to combat violent crime and to shore up morale across the nation's police departments, on Monday in his first on-the-record briefing as the top U.S. law enforcement officer.

President Trump's initial budget proposal isn't enough to expand the military in the way he proposed.

Trump campaigned on the need to add tens of thousands more troops to the Army and Marine Corps, field a Navy with 350 warships or more and also to upgrade the Air Force. The $54 billion he's seeking to increase the Defense Department budget this year would represent a funding boost — but not one that would pay for an expansion on the scale Trump endorsed.

When it comes to climate change, we often think of the cars we drive and the energy we use in our homes and offices. They are, after all, some of the biggest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions. But what about the toast you ate for breakfast this morning?

A new study published Monday in Nature Plants breaks down the environmental cost of producing a loaf of bread, from wheat field to bakery. It finds that the bulk of the associated greenhouse gas emissions come from just one of the many steps that go into making that loaf: farming.

It started out a simple, human interest story featuring a former president and his post-White House hobby — painting watercolors of world leaders, and now, portraits of American soldiers, wounded during military service.

One of the very first bills President Trump signed into law this month killed a Securities and Exchange Commission rule meant to promote transparency in countries riddled with corruption. Trump said getting rid of the rule, which required oil, gas and mining companies to disclose overseas royalties and other payments, would bring back jobs and save extraction companies many hours of paperwork and, potentially, hundreds of millions of dollars.

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