Montana News

Eric Whitney

Medicaid Expansion Wins Preliminary Approval In Montana Senate

The Montana Senate today gave preliminary approval to a bill to expand Medicaid coverage to the state's working poor on a 28 to 22 vote.
Read More

Featured

Students In Poland Improve Their English With Pea Green Boat

Last week Annie received this email message from a teacher in Poland:Dear MTPR, especially the Pea Green Boat Crew!Warm hello from Warsaw, Poland! Just wanted to let you know that my 11 year-old-students (Mania and Bartek) and I enjoyed A LOT listening to the Velveteen Rabbit! We listened for gist, we listened for detailed information, we listened for some new vocab...and we drew pictures (attached). It was a fantastic English class! Many thanks for your great work and we're looking forward...
Read More

Follow MTPR

Facebook | Twitter

Are We In Your Inbox?

MTPR's email newsletter keeps you connected

The Hidden Costs Of Teacher Turnover

13 minutes ago

Every year, thousands of fresh-faced teachers are handed the keys to a new classroom, given a pat on the back and told "Good luck!"

Over the next five years though, nearly half of those teachers will transfer to a new school or leave the profession all together — only to be replaced with similarly fresh-faced teachers.

This is Part One in an occasional series of features on campaign finance, called "Money Rules."

The hunt for big bucks is changing the way politicians run for president.

When a candidate finally admits he or she is a candidate, donors are limited to gifts of $2,700. (A donor can give an additional $2,700 if the candidate makes it through to the general election.)

Walking through the warehouse of food processor Heartland Gourmet in Lincoln, Neb., shows how complicated the food safety system can be. Pallets are stacked with sacks of potato flour, and the smell of fresh-baked apple-cinnamon muffins floats in the air.

Heartland Gourmet makes a wide range of foods — from muffins and organic baking mixes to pizzas and burritos. That means business manager Mark Zink has to answer to both of the main U.S. food safety regulators, the Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration.

Thirty-four years ago today, John Hinckley Jr. tried to kill President Reagan.

Reagan was shot in the chest but made a full recovery. Three others, including press secretary James Brady, were wounded.

Veteran journalist Judy Woodruff, now with PBS Newshour, was then a reporter with NBC News. She tweeted her recollection of the events of the day:

Last week Annie received this email message from a teacher in Poland:

Dear MTPR, especially the Pea Green Boat Crew!

Warm hello from Warsaw, Poland! Just wanted to let you know that my 11 year-old-students (Mania and Bartek) and I enjoyed A LOT listening to the Velveteen Rabbit! We listened for gist, we listened for detailed information, we listened for some new vocab...and we drew pictures (attached). It was a fantastic English class! Many thanks for your great work and we're looking forward to listening some more radio plays!

Monika

No one in politics today is hearing more calls from progressives to run than Elizabeth Warren, the popular and populist Massachusetts senator. Warren denies any interest, though, in the presidency and continued to do that Monday in an interview with Jeremy Hobson on WBUR's Here & Now.

"I'm out here fighting this fight," Warren said. "I'm fighting it every single day in the United States."

Asked if she wants to run, Warren said bluntly, "I do not."

Two former federal agents accused of stealing bitcoins have been charged with wire fraud, money laundering and related offenses, the U.S. Justice Department said in a statement.

If pushing a cart up and down the lengthy aisles of your neighborhood supermarket — past dozens of brands of packaged cereal and crackers lit by fluorescent lights — feels overwhelming and soul-sucking, you're not alone.

But there's some good news: The days of shopping this way may be numbered.

Scientists in California are hoping to use your smart phone to solve a cosmic mystery. They're developing an app to turn your phone into a cosmic ray detector. If enough people install the app, the scientists think they'll be able to figure out once and for all what's producing the very energetic cosmic rays that occasionally hit the Earth.

After presenting emotional testimony about the the physical damage one of the bombs inflicted on 8-year-old Martin Richard, the prosecution rested in its case against admitted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

NPR's Tovia Smith is inside the court room and she's been Tweeting about the trial. She reports:

After that testimony, Tsarnaev's defense attorneys did not have any questions, so the prosecution rested its case.

The AP reports:

Pages