Montana News

Chuck Johnson, Sally Mauk and Mike Dennison
Eliza Wiley

Lee Newspapers Closing Capitol Bureau

Late Thursday afternoon a news story broke on the Great Falls Tribune website that spread across Twitter like wildfire, and struck some people like a death in the family: Lee Newspapers, which owns five of Montana’s largest papers, is closing its state bureau, and its two reporters, Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison, are leaving the company.
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MTPR Features

Clay Scott

A Forgotten War

When Jack Price returned home from the Korean war in 1953, few people in his small western Montana community understood or seemed to care what he had been through. 58 years later, he travels back to Korea to try and make sense of the 'forgotten war' that shaped his life.
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Who Let The Dogs In? We Did, About 30,000 Years Ago

It looks like dogs might well have been man's (and woman's) best friend for a lot longer than once thought.The long-held conventional wisdom is that canis lupus familiaris split from wolves 11,000 to 16,000 years ago and that the divergence was helped along by Stone Age humans who wanted a fellow hunter, a sentry and a companion.Now, DNA evidence suggests that the split between dogs and their wild ancestors occurred closer to 30,000 years ago.Publishing in Thursday's edition of Current...
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50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest Winners

California's drought is turning neighbor against neighbor, as everyone seems to be on the lookout for water wasters.

Take Los Angeles resident Jane Demian, for example. She recently got a letter from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's Water Conservation Response Unit, about an unverified report of prohibited water use activity at her home in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of L.A. Demian says she was called out for water runoff onto the sidewalk, driveway and gutter, and the unauthorized "washdown of hardscapes" like the walkway to her house.

'Remember The Maine' — In Indiana!

5 minutes ago

NPR — along with seven public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops where they live. We're calling the project "Back at Base."

It was the spark that led to America's first overseas war. After an explosion sank the battleship USS Maine in Havana Harbor in 1898, the cry rose up in the U.S. to "Remember the Maine."

The event was commemorated across the country — sometimes in unexpected places — like the city of East Chicago, Ind.

It's early evening in Friendship Cemetery, the local graveyard in Columbus, Miss. The white tombstones are coated with that yellow glow you only see right before dusk.

Students from the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science are spread out among the gravestones. They're dressed up in costumes: A tall brunette is wearing a dark maroon dress her grandmother made. A young man wears a top hat and leans on a walking cane.

Soccer fans are replacing their favorite club jerseys for national colors as the best female players in the world prepare to face off in Canada for World Cup 2015, which starts on June 6.

The American Outlaws, considered the biggest U.S. national soccer fan association, has already been rocking red, white and blue to cheer on the women's national team.

Charter Communications, the No. 4 U.S. cable company, is reportedly close to buying Time Warner Cable, the nation's second-largest, for $55 billion, Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times are reporting.

Americans are paying tribute today, Memorial Day, to the sacrifices of service members in the nation's earliest conflicts and the newest.

President Obama laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery, just outside Washington.

Some 5,000 people were at the grounds of the cemetery, which Obama called "more than a final resting place for fallen heroes." It is, he said, "a reflection of America itself. A reflection of our history, the wars we've waged for democracy, the peace we've laid to preserve it.

Updated at 1:04 p.m. ET

Iraq and Iran are refuting Defense Secretary Ash Carter's assertion that Iraqi forces lacked the "will to fight" the self-declared Islamic State, resulting in the loss last week of Anbar Province and its capital, Ramadi.

Saad al-Hadithi, a spokesman for Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, told The Associated Press Ramadi's loss was due to mismanagement and poor planning by some senior military commanders.

Police in Malaysia say they have uncovered more evidence of human smuggling, with the discovery of at least 139 graves along the country's border with Thailand.

Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who as recently as 2009 led his country, was sentenced Monday by a Jerusalem court to eight months in prison for unlawfully accepting money from a U.S. supporter.

As we reported in March when Olmert was convicted in the case:

The National Weather Service is forecasting more heavy rain today in parts of Texas and Oklahoma that are reeling from weekend flooding that damaged and destroyed homes and killed at least three people.

The National Weather Service predicted severe thunderstorms in north and northeast Texas, southeast Oklahoma and southwest Arkansas. Residents of those areas should expected damaging winds, some hurricane force, a few tornadoes, hail, some baseball-sized, the service said.

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