Montana News

Alan Kirk, mine permitting manager, and Bob Jacko, vice president of operations for Tintina show plans for the Black Butte Mine.
Steve Jess

Montanans Weigh The Risks And Rewards Of Mining Near The Smith River

About 50 miles east of Helena, in White Sulphur Springs, residents are weighing the benefits that a new copper mine could bring to their community: about 200 new jobs along with millions of dollars to spur business growth. Opponents of the mine say Montana risks losing something even more valuable, one of its last unspoiled rivers.
Read More

Wildfire News

Fire season news and information.

MTPR Features

Glenn Close Helps Sister Jessie Find Her Path To Mental Health

About the book: At a young age, Jessie Close struggled with symptoms that would transform into severe bipolar disorder in her early twenties, but she was not properly diagnosed until the age of fifty.
Read More

Azar Lawrence Improvises And Inspires

Legendary jazz saxophonist Azar Lawrence released "Prayer For My Ancestors" in 2008, 33 years after his 1976 album, "People Moving". But the long gap between recordings doesn't mean Lawrence has been short of work. He's known as the go-to sideman for McCoy Tyner, Miles Davis, Freddie Hubbard and Woody Shaw.
Read More

Montana Music Festivals

Montana music festivals to keep you dancing all summer

Are We In Your Inbox?

MTPR's email newsletter keeps you connected

What's Your Marketing Strategy?

Build a relationship with MTPR's extraordinary audience

Eat It, Say It...Spell It? Food Names At The Bee

16 hours ago
Flickr user, Erin M (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Recently, Food Guy Greg Patent attended the National Spelling Bee, where his grandson and a S-M-O-R-G-A-S-B-O-R-D of other teenagers competed for a chance to spell out a G-O-U-L-A-S-H of international words, including a lot of food names. From B-O-U-I-L-L-A-B-A-I-S-S-E to P-F-E-F-F-E-R-N-U-S-S-E, F-A-T-A-Y-E-R to A-V-G-O-L-E-M-O-N-O: if you favor the food, you might best the bee.

The Marriage of Figaro

Aug 1, 2015

08/08/2015 - composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

http://www.wfmt.com/main.taf?p=12,10,6,3

Grasshoppers: 'A Crisp, Electric Spark of Joy'

Aug 1, 2015
There are nearly 400 species of grasshoppers in the 17 western states.
(PD)

Did you know grasshoppers sing with their legs, and hear with their abdomens? Learn more with this field note from the Montana Natural History Center.

The Good Show

Jul 31, 2015

08/07/2015 - In this episode, a question that haunted Charles Darwin: if natural selection boils down to survival of the fittest, how do you explain why one creature might stick its neck out for another? Is altruism an aberration, or just an elaborate guise for sneaky self-interest? Do we really live in a selfish, dog-eat-dog world? Or has evolution carved out a hidden code that rewards genuine cooperation?

http://www.radiolab.org/story/103951-the-good-show/

Evening Newscast 07-31-15

Jul 31, 2015
MTPR Evening Newscast
Josh Burnham

On tonight's evening newscast: It’s been an active day on the fire burning on the east side of Glacier National Park. There’s been significant smoke in the area this afternoon. Fire information officer Shauna Hartman explains why.

A court official says the 18-year-old man accused of shooting a family who stopped to help him on a roadside on the Crow reservation Wednesday was released from a Wyoming jail two weeks earlier.

The Helena National Forest is trying to figure out who vandalized pictographs dating back from hundreds to thousands of years ago in the forest’s Hellgate Canyon.

Officials with Cloud Peak Energy, which mines coal in Montana, say they are optimistic, despite a downturn in the coal industry and a $53 million second-quarter loss.

The nation's only platinum and palladium mine is reporting a $27.5 million loss for the second quarter of 2015.

Pockets of unburned fuel in the interior of the Reynolds Creek fire burned actively Friday, July 31.
Inciweb

It’s been an active day on the fire burning on the east side of Glacier National Park. There’s been significant smoke in the area this afternoon. Fire information officer Shauna Hartman explains why.

Medicare Turns 50 But Big Challenges Await

Jul 31, 2015
Harry Truman's application for Medicare
Courtesy of Truman Library

Medicare, the federal health insurance program for the elderly and disabled, has come a long way since its creation in 1965 when nearly half of all seniors were uninsured. Now, the program covers 55 million people, providing insurance to one in six Americans. With that in mind, Medicare faces a host of challenges in the decades to come. Here’s a look at some of them.

Five Challenges Facing Medicaid At 50

Jul 31, 2015
President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the bill creating Medicare and Medicaid at the library of former President Harry Truman, who was in attendance, on July 30, 1965.
Courtesy of Truman Library

A “sleeper” provision when Congress created Medicare in 1965 to cover health care for seniors, Medicaid now provides coverage to nearly one in four Americans, at an annual cost of more than $500 billion. Today, it is the workhorse of the U.S. health system, covering nearly half of all births, one-third of children and two-thirds of people in nursing homes.

Alan Kirk, mine permitting manager, and Bob Jacko, vice president of operations for Tintina show plans for the Black Butte Mine.
Steve Jess

About 50 miles east of Helena, in White Sulphur Springs, residents are weighing the benefits that a new copper mine could bring to their community: about 200 new jobs along with millions of dollars to spur business growth. Opponents of the mine say Montana risks losing something even more valuable, one of its last unspoiled rivers.

MontanaFWP Wants Your Input On Bison Management

Jul 31, 2015
A bison herd at the National Bison Range in Montana.
USFWS (CC-BY-2)

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials will hold five public hearings in August to find out if there’s a place for bison on the Montana landscape. The first two hearings are scheduled next week in Bozeman and Billings. Bison are managed both as a wildlife species, and for disease control because of brucellosis.

Pages