Montana News

UM President Seth Bodnar meets with UM's oldest living graduate Emma Lommasson in Missoula, Thursday Feb. 15, 2018.
Edward O'Brien

New UM President Meets Oldest Living Graduate

At 106 years-old Emma Lommasson is the University of Montana’s oldest living graduate. When Lommasson woke up Thursday morning, she could boast of having met all but five of UM’s presidents. By Thursday afternoon, with the help of some loyal friends, that list whittled down to four when President Seth Bodnar walked in her senior living center to surprise her.

Read More
Sally Kohn, Krista Tippett, Erick Erickson.
Krista Tippet Photo: Peter Beck

Join In A Civil Conversation With 'On Being’s' Krista Tippett

Join us for an exercise in civil political disagreement with " On Being’s" Krista Tippett , along with guests Sally Kohn and Erick Erickson at a live on-stage event Tuesday, March 20 at 7:00 p.m. in Missoula at the Dennison Theater on the UM Campus. Admission is free. The exploration of politics and civility will be about 90 minutes long and there will be time for Q & A, so bring your best questions. The conversation will be recorded, and if all goes well it may be edited for an episode of "On Being" or included in the Civil Conversations website archive .

Read More

MTPR Features

Noah Gundersen's Music May Be Just What The Soul Doctor Ordered

The songs on "White Noise," the latest recording from Seattle singer, guitarist and songwriter Noah Gundersen , draw comparisons to Jackson Browne, Neil Young and Iron & Wine. Fellow Seattleite Nancy Wilson of Heart raved, in 2011: “Noah Gundersen is my favorite new singer-songwriter. Music like this will never become dated. His timeless songs are full of true humanity and longing. Just what the soul doctor ordered.”

Read More

MTPR Schedule

Montana Public Radio Schedule

See what's coming up on MTPR


Connect with MTPR

Get Montana Public Radio In Your Inbox

Sign up for our weekly email newsletter

The chairman of the Federal Communication Commission announced during a staff meeting on Friday that he intends to step down "in the coming weeks."

Julius Genachowski's resignation comes just a day after Commissioner Robert McDowell announced his plans to step down.

The New York Times reports the Obama administration has not settled on a replacement for Genachowski. It reports:

What you do while you're asleep may say something about your cognitive function later in life.

Here's why. Mayo Clinic researchers report that having a condition called REM sleep behavior disorder, in which you act out dreams in your sleep, appears to be a harbinger for something called Lewy body dementia years later — at least in men.

The NCAA tournament got off to a stunning start on Thursday: Harvard, known more for its brains and seeded No. 14, sent No. 3 New Mexico packing with a 62-68 win.

Moscow First Stop For New Chinese Leader

Mar 22, 2013

Newly installed Chinese President Xi Jinping is following in his predecessor's footsteps by making Russia his first official trip abroad.

The visits by Xi and Hu Jintao before him (in 2003), both meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, reinforce how the Cold War rivals have grown closer as they seek to counter U.S. influence in Asia and Europe.

As a deadline on Cyprus to come up with a financial bailout plan nears, a possible rescue from Russia looks to have fallen apart, leaving the island nation few options for staving off default.

Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said as far as Moscow was concerned "the talks have ended," but Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev left the door open, saying aid from Moscow would be contingent on Cyprus gaining European Union backing for its other money-raising ideas.

Chinua Achebe, Nigerian Author Of 'Things Fall Apart,' Dies

Mar 22, 2013

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports from Lagos, Nigeria, on the death of one of Africa's greatest contemporary writers. Quoting his publisher, AP, CNN, and the BBC are reporting Chinua Achebe has died.

Chinua Achebe who taught at colleges in the United States made literary history with his 1958 best-seller Things Fall Apart, a sobering tale about Nigeria at the beginning of its colonization.

President Obama wrapped up his trip to Israel and the West Bank on Friday with visits to three symbolic pilgrimage sites: First he laid a stone on the grave of Theodor Herzl, the father of modern Zionism, then he laid a wreath and a stone on the grave of Yitzhak Rabin, the Israeli leader assassinated in 1995. Finally, Obama made a somber visit to the Holocaust memorial Yad Vashem.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

In Chicago, officials have released a long-feared list that places more than 50 schools on the chopping block. The public school district faces a $1 billion shortfall, and the mayor says many of the city's school buildings are half empty. Some angry parents and teachers say the plan will harm children and they'll fight to keep the schools open.

A Marine opened fire at a Virginia base Thursday night, killing two other Marines before turning the gun on himself.

Quoting Marine Base Quantico spokesman Lt. Agustin Solivan, the AP reports the shootings happened after 11 p.m. near the Officer Candidate School. The AP adds:

"Authorities entered the barracks early Friday and found the suspect dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound along with a second victim. Solivan could not say what prompted authorities to enter the barracks, which are at the base's officer candidate school.