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Flooding in Augusta, MT, June 19, 2018.
Lewis and Clark County Sheriff's Office.

Flooding Closes Highways Along Rocky Mountain Front

Heavy rain falling along the Rocky Mountain Front over the last several days has triggered flooding and road closures in and around the town of Augusta, and closed all the roads into the town.

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Betsayda Machado y La Parranda El Clavo perform at the 2017 Montana Folk Festival in Butte, MT.
Josh Burnham

Highlights From The 2017 Montana Folk Festival

We heard music from all over the country and the world during the 2017 Montana Folk Festival. Consider this the highlight reel from MTPR's live broadcasts from the festival. In the first hour, you'll hear Cajun and Acadian music from Bruce Daigrepont of Metarie, LA; the North Carolina-based gospel brass shout band, Cedric Mangum and Company; and the Ethiopian jazz of Washington, D.C.'s Feedel Band. In the second half of the program, we'll feature reggae from Seattle-based Clinton Fearon and the Boogie Brown Band; Chicago blues from Toronzo Cannon; and the Texas-style triple-fiddles and harmonies of The Quebe Sisters.

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Arts & Music

Kids Like You And Me: Missoula's All-Abilities Playground

Recently, "Pea Green Boat" Skipper Annie Garde took a tour of Silver Summit , a "playground for everyone" in Missoula's McCormick Park. It's an all-abilities playround that invites children excited by the brightly-colored equipment and welcoming atmosphere to discover nooks, crannies and equipment that can accommodate their bodies, their mobility devices, and their ways of playing. Listen as Heath, Jenny, Logan, Adam, Lisa and Mataya show Annie their favorite spots at Silver Summit.

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Program Archives

Find archives of the last two weeks of locally produced music shows from MTPR.

Beer And Butte Stories: Join Us For The Richest Hill Launch Party!

Grab a [free] beer with MTPR and chat with the team behind Richest Hill, a new project all about the future of Butte, America.

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HBO CEO Richard Plepler is saying something a lot of the television network's fans have been waiting to hear — that its content could be offered to customers directly through their Internet service providers instead of a cable company.

Right now, HBO must be purchased through a cable provider. Plepler tells Reuters that HBO Go, an online streaming service launched by the network in 2010 (but still only available as an extra to your cable TV) might also be sold through ISPs.

Gay marriage opponents say they're protecting women and children first.

When the Supreme Court hears oral arguments about same-sex marriage next week, much of the debate will turn on legal questions surrounding issues such as federalism and due process.

But the underlying questions are more emotional, with moral objections frequently raised by members of the faith community.

Drug-sniffing dogs, those cute bellwethers of illegal activity, are dropping Marijuana from their repertoire in Washington state.

A 2012 ballot initiative legalized the use of marijuana in the state (although federal law still prohibits its use). Since then authorities have been working to implement the law. Part of that process is, apparently, to employ canines who don't react to the smell of marijuana. The AP explains why:

In a phone call today with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu apologized to Turkey over the 2010 Israeli raid of a flotilla that left nine people dead. The flotilla was attempting to break an Israeli naval blockade of Gaza, when it was intercepted by Israel.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barber Shop, where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Bosco Ntaganda, a notorious warlord accused of crimes against humanity during Congo's civil war, is headed to an international court after turning himself in at the U.S. Embassy in Rwanda earlier this week.

NPR's Gregory Warner reports that the surrender of Ntaganda, nicknamed "The Terminator," came as a surprise. He's been wanted by the International Criminal Court since 2006 for crimes against humanity, including conscripting child soldiers, murder, rape and sexual slavery allegedly committed in 2002 and 2003 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

For many years, across the world, the extraordinarily powerful noses of dogs have been successfully used to help detect crime.

Now, in Britain, moves are under way to recruit humans to perform the same subtle work.

Police are encouraging the British to step out of their homes, raise their nostrils aloft, and see if they catch the whiff of wrongdoing wafting from the next-door neighbors.

Visitors to these crowded islands are often charmed by the small redbrick terraced houses that are in every town and city.

NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris traveled to Australia's Great Barrier Reef to find out how the coral reefs are coping with increased water temperature and increasing ocean acidity, brought about by our burning of fossil fuels. Day 4: Richard catches up with one of the gurus of climate science out on the reef.

Ken Caldeira loves a challenge, and he has a big one right under his feet. He's standing on an expanse of coral reef out in Australia's Great Barrier Reef. It's being washed with water as the tide streams over the reef, from a lagoon to the open sea.

The chairman of the Federal Communication Commission announced during a staff meeting on Friday that he intends to step down "in the coming weeks."

Julius Genachowski's resignation comes just a day after Commissioner Robert McDowell announced his plans to step down.

The New York Times reports the Obama administration has not settled on a replacement for Genachowski. It reports:

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