Montana News

News from the state of Montana.

Eliza Wiley

This week on Capitol Talk: Sally, Mike and Chuck look back at the week's events at the Montana Legislature, from the Flathead water compact, to dark money, to the death of the death penalty repeal.

William Marcus

State lawmakers are taking a five-day break before starting the second half of the 2015 legislature. While much of their work remains unfinished, one bill that’s already on its way to the Governor could set the stage for a showdown.

Josh Burnham

Attorney General Tim Fox says he needs more time to analyze how $65 million from the sale of Missoula’s Community Medical Center should be used.

Fox approved the sale itself January 12. Still pending is Community’s proposal for where money from the sale should go.

"Because the proposal was submitted rather late in the process, we felt we did not have sufficient time to review that," said John Barnes, spokesman for the attorney general.

Lawmakers Say Much Work Remains As Legislature Reaches Half-Way Point

Feb 27, 2015
Michael Wright - Community News Service

The Montana Legislature is at the half-way point of the scheduled 90-day session.

It’s more than just the numerical half-way point; it’s a key legislative deadline. All non-spending or non-tax bills had to meet the Day 45 deadline of being transmitted to the other chamber or they died.

Lawmakers will now have nearly a week off before they return to the Capitol to resume their work.

Yellowstone Public Radio’s Jackie Yamanaka talked to legislative leaders and the governor about the progress so far, and what lies ahead.

Legislators: Montana Entitled To Money From Public Land Sales

Feb 26, 2015
Montana Legislature

Thursday, the Montana Senate passed a bill to ask the Federal Government to pay up for lands they’ve sold off.

Republican Representative Jennifer Fielder says under the Enabling Act, the Government is supposed to pay the state 5 percent of whatever money it makes selling off public lands. Fielder said they’ve been shirking this duty, costing Montana money intended for schools.

“They’ve really never been asked for this, I think it’s just a small detail that’s been overlooked for a very long time.”

House Tax Cut Bill Faces Likely Veto

Feb 26, 2015
William Marcus

Thursday, the Montana House of Representatives passed a bill to increase tax cuts for all Montanans. The bill’s sponsor, Republican Representative Keith Regier, brought this bill back to the House floor after a committee amended it to increase the tax cuts from .1 percent to .2 percent.

Regier says it’s good to give back when the government is in the black.

“A smart, responsible governor will recognize who’s funding the government and give them a break.”

Bill Diverts Coal Trust Taxes To Fund Infrastructure Projects

Feb 26, 2015
Montana Coal Council

The Montana Senate gave final approval to a pair of bills seeking to make long-term infrastructure investments using coal severance tax money. To do that, voters would be asked to approve a constitutional amendment.

The effort faces an uphill battle to get the necessary votes in the House to put the issue before voters.

'Dark Money' Disclosure Bill Narrowly Passes Senate

Feb 26, 2015
William Marcus

The Senate gave final approval to a bill that would shine the light on so-called “dark money” donations in Montana’s political campaigns.

Senator Duane Ankney says when neighbors contribute to a political campaign, the candidate is required to report that person’s name, address, and occupation.

Montana Department of Transportation

As it rushed toward its mid-session break, the Montana Senate Thursday killed a bill to cut back on the corrosive de-icing chemicals sprayed on the state’s roadways each winter.

Republican Dee Brown of Hungry Horse says the Montana Transportation Department is using more salt-based chemicals to melt ice on Montana’s highways, potentially damaging not just cars and trucks, but the environment as well.

"I am very concerned that the runoff and continuing runoff of chloride-based products is not good for us," Brown said.

flickr user: Roy Luck (CC-BY-2.0)

A new analysis of train safety and recent accidents involving spilled crude oil has caught the attention of many Montanans, especially as more trains carrying oil are moving through the state.

That’s because a lot crude moves on our rail lines.

Pages