News

Pages

Monday Poems
11:00 am
Mon May 19, 2014

"Teaching Poetry to 3rd Graders"

Gary Short
Credit poet, teacher, Nevada author

At recess a boy ran to me
with a pink rubber ball and asked
if I would kick it to him. He handed me the ball,
then turned and ran
and ran and ran, not turning back
until he was far out in the field.
I wasn't sure I could kick the ball
that far. But I tried,
launching a perfect and lucky kick.
The ball sailed in a beautiful arc
about eight stories high,
landed within a few feet of the 3rd grader
and took a big bounce off the hard playground dirt.
Pleased, I turned to enter the school building.

Read more
Music Special
8:44 am
Mon May 19, 2014

Monumental Disagreements

Image by: Library of Congress

05/26/2014 - This is a country awash in monuments. They adorn traffic circles, street corners and, of course, the National Mall. In this special Memorial Day episode of BackStory, the American History Guys explore the idea of national remembrance. What or whom have Americans chosen to memorialize? And what do these choices say about us?

http://www.prx.org/pieces/97429-monumental-disagreements-rebroadcast

Read more
The Food Guys
8:00 am
Sun May 18, 2014

Peanuts

Franz Kohler's botanical drawing of the peanut plant (Arachis hypogaea)
Credit Franz Eugen Köhler, from Köhler's "Medizinal-Pflanzen"

5/18/14: This week on "The Food Guys:" Where did peanuts come from? What's the biggest commercial use for peanuts? Who grows the most peanuts?  What's the most prudent way to eat deep-fried peanuts? Greg and Jon dispel myths and reveal surprises about the legume known alternately as "groundnut," "peanut," and "goober pea."

Read more
The Plant Detective
8:00 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Rhodiola Rosea

5/17/14: This week on "The Plant Detective:" The harsh living conditions of rhodiola, a plant that grows at high latitudes and elevations, might explain the strong protective compounds it produces. People of the Arctic used it in their folk medicine for everything from increasing endurance and fighting fatigue, infection and depression to increasing fertility, sharpening memory, and reducing the effects of aging and stress.

Read more
Front Row Center
8:00 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Missoula's Dana Gallery Hosts Art Exhibit, "Icons of the West"

Parvin's "Milliseconds Count," from the new exhibit at The Dana Gallery in Missoula, "Icons of the West."
Credit The Dana Gallery

5/18/14: This week on "Front Row Center:" Michael Marsolek talks with Dudely Dana, co-owner of The Dana Gallery in Missoula, about the gallery's third annual national juried art exhibition, titled "Icons of the West."

Read more
Montana News
5:25 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Teaching stewardship for the future by honoring the past

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Annual River Honoring this year brought more than 1,000 4th and 5th graders from across the reservation and beyond to the Lower Flathead River.
Credit Katrin Frye

Each May for about two decades the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes have held a River Honoring and invited children from across the reservation and beyond. The honoring started in 1986 in response to a push for additional dams below Kerr Dam, along the lower Flathead River.

Education Specialist Germaine White with the Division of Fish, Wildlife, Recreation and Conservation said the Tribal Culture Committee was very concerned about a disturbance to the river.

Read more
Campaign Beat
2:59 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Have you noticed the tone of the campaign ads getting a little, um, nastier?

Chuck Johnson, Sally Mauk, Mike Dennison
Credit Eliza Wiley

The political ads and parries are increasing - and changing tone - as the June 3rd primary approaches.

In this edition of "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program, News Director Sally Mauk talks with Lee newspapers' Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison about the rising campaign heat, especially in the high profile races.

Read more
Commentary - May 16th, 2014
1:03 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Pragmatic Conservation Bills

Last fall, my wife and I quit working.  We turned off our cell phones and closed our laptops.  We assembled a stack of good books, a pile of knitting, and packed every piece of wool clothing in the house.  Then, we skipped town. 

We pulled off the interstate at the first opportunity and cruised along the Blackfoot River, running low, cold, and sluggish between its banks in mid-November. We climbed over the Continental Divide and descended onto the high plains that stretch eastward for an eternity. 

Read more
Commentary - May 15th, 2014
12:49 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Our Public Lands - Not From Our Cold, Dead Hands

Heart Lake lunch
Credit U.S. Forest Service Northern Region

“This land is your land, this land is my land.” In 1944 Woody Guthrie made this song famous as the US struggled to lift itself out of the Great Depression and the Second World War. Today those words epitomize a new battle occurring in the American West...one where misguided lawmakers are embroiled in a bitter battle over the future of our public lands. This is land they see fit to exploit and sell to the highest bidder and, sadly enough, Montana is no exception.

Read more
Commentary - May 12th, 2014
12:39 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Protecting our streams key to buffering the impacts of climate change

Meadow creek fly fishing
Credit U.S. Forest Service Northern Region

The most recent report from the International Panel on Climate Change indicates that the greenhouse gases continue to accumulate in the atmosphere at an alarming rate, with concentrations the highest they have been in at least 800,000 years.  The thousands of international scientists comprising the panel warn that resulting global warming will severely reduce sea ice and continental ice masses, producing rising sea levels, dramatic changes in ocean alkalinity and modifications of the dominant ocean currents that produce weather.

Read more

Pages