Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MaryAnn Anselmo feared for the worst when she was diagnosed with a brain tumor called a glioblastoma in late 2013.

"You start doing research on that type of tumor, and you're saying, 'Oh my God, you're history.' It's like a death sentence," says, Anselmo, now 59.

Only for her it wasn't.

Anselmo's successful treatment shows how precision medicine — tailoring therapy to each patient's genetic needs — is beginning to transform cancer care.

I once met a popular spoken word poet in Ethiopia who was asked by a government official to write a poem about the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. (He politely explained that he didn't do poetry about infrastructure.) But it's not surprising that Ethiopia would like to inscribe this dam into the Ethiopian epic.

The Willacy County Correctional Center is empty now. The tall security fences and dome-like housing units set out on the coastal prairie have no one inside them.

One morning late last month, the prisoners rioted. They set fires and tore the place up. Guards put down the uprising in about five hours. But the destruction was so severe that the sprawling detention compound has been shut down. All 2,800 inmates were transferred.

Willacy County is now facing the question — what does it do now that its biggest moneymaker is out of business?

Updated at 12:10 p.m. E.T.

Doctors who treat Medicare patients will face a huge cut, 21 percent, if Congress doesn't act by the end of the month. This isn't a new problem. While Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill agree that the formula that pays doctors who treat Medicare patients has long been broken, over the years they've been unable to pass more than temporary patches.

Announcing Ira Glass!

Mar 25, 2015

Ira's coming to perform his solo show in Missoula as part of MTPR's 50th anniversary year.

Rep. Carl Glimm (R) HD6
Montana Legislature

A wide array of interest groups and state officials lined up to testify against a bill that purports to give Montanans more religious freedom, because they say it would only guarantee the freedom to discriminate.

Carl Glimm, a Republican Representative from Ashley Lake, is sponsoring a bill that, he says, would ensure that the government could not infringe on a person’s religious rights unless it had a “compelling interest” in doing so.

Connor Gorry On Life In Cuba As An American

Mar 25, 2015
FLIKR USER pohang

Visualize a small business that occupies one room, serves tea, coffee, and pastries and sells books and an array of magazines from Time to Gentleman's Quarterly. There are chairs and couches for reading and conversation and in the small yard outside, rich in tropical plants are tables and chairs, a bench, and even a hammock. A mixed color, curly hair Terrier, Toby, wags a greeting from the open door. Walking by on the sidewalk, you get the feeling that it would be a nice place to relax and visit for ten minutes, or an hour.

Evening Newscast 03-25-15

Mar 25, 2015
Josh Burnham

On this edition of the Montana Evening Newscast, State and federal regulators say the response to a 30,000-gallon oil spill into the Yellowstone River near Glendive is shifting from emergency crude recovery to long-term monitoring and remediation.

The Veterans Administration has made a change that should make it easier for Montana vets to get health care.

Critics of a Montana “religious freedom” bill say that the measure would actually promote discrimination, even anarchy, if it’s passed.

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