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The Two-Way
10:11 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Putin Speaks About The Killing Of Kremlin Critic Boris Nemtsov

Russian President Vladimir Putin (left) attends an Interior Ministry meeting Wednesday in Moscow. He condemned the death of Boris Nemtsov, saying it was a "disgrace" to Russia.
Alexei Druzhinin AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin has for the first time spoken publicly about the killing of Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov, calling his death a shameful tragedy. Nemtsov, a former deputy prime minister who became a major opposition figure, was shot four times in the back Friday as he was walking near the Kremlin.

"The most serious attention should be paid to high-profile crimes, including the ones with a political subtext," Putin said in a televised address to the Interior Ministry. He said the country should be devoid of the shame and tragedies it's recently seen and endured.

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Code Switch
9:46 am
Wed March 4, 2015

A Few Reactions to the DOJ's 'Scathing' Report on Ferguson Cops And Racial Bias

Ferguson Police Department and the Municipal Court in Ferguson, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

The Justice Department reportedly did not find enough evidence to charge white officer Darren Wilson with any civil rights violations for shooting Michael Brown last August. But they did find plenty of evidence of routine discrimination by Ferguson police against black residents.

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NPR Ed
9:36 am
Wed March 4, 2015

The Magic Trick That Could Shorten The FAFSA

The IRS and the Department of Education have the power to make the FAFSA easier without cutting questions. So why haven't they?
LA Johnson/NPR

Read part one of our reporting on the FAFSA, "Shrink The FAFSA? Good Luck With That"

It's deadline time for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Better known as the FAFSA.

The daunting application — with its 108 questions — stands between many college hopefuls and much-needed financial aid.

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The Two-Way
8:34 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Japanese World War II Battleship Musashi Found, Billionaire Paul Allen Says

A valve on the Musashi.
Courtesy of Paul Allen

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 11:26 am

The World War II-era Japanese battleship Musashi was sunk by U.S. warplanes on Oct. 24, 1944, during the Battle of Leyte Gulf, one of the war's largest naval battles. Despite numerous eyewitness accounts at the time, the location of the wreckage was never known. Until now.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Born In 1898: World's Oldest Living Person Celebrates Birthday

Misao Okawa, the world's oldest living person, poses for a photo with her son Hiroshi Okawa, 92, left, and other family members and friends on her 117th birthday celebration at Kurenai Nursing Home in Osaka, Japan.
Buddhika Weerasinghe Getty Images

It's now past midnight in Japan, meaning that Misao Okawa, the world's oldest human being, has officially turned 117. She was born on March 5, 1898, and now lives in a retirement home in Osaka.

Okawa has reigned as the world's oldest living person since 2013, when Guinness World Records certified that she was 115.

Okawa celebrated her birthday by eating cake and taking photos with her family, which includes several great-grandchildren.

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Shots - Health News
8:25 am
Wed March 4, 2015

What's A Patient To Do When Hospital Ratings Disagree?

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 8:59 am

When you face a choice about hotels, restaurants or cars, the chances are you head to the Web for help.

Online ratings have become essential tools for modern consumers. Health care is no exception to the ratings game, especially when it comes to hospitals.

Many people check up on hospitals before they check in as patients. But there's a catch. A hospital that gets lauded by one group can be panned by another.

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Code Switch
7:50 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Rapper Jin Tries To Stretch His '15 Minutes' Of Fame

Jin poses for a photograph during an interview with the AP in Hong Kong in 2008.
Jerome Favre AP

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Man's Identity Questioned In LAPD Skid Row Shooting

Protesters gather in front of the Los Angeles Police Department Headquarters Tuesday, to express anger over the fatal shooting of an unarmed homeless man Sunday.
David McNew Getty Images

New details have emerged in the case of a homeless man who was killed by Los Angeles police Sunday, as officials say he was the subject of a federal warrant related to violating probation. There's also word that he lived under a stolen identity; for now, his true name is a mystery.

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The Two-Way
6:26 am
Wed March 4, 2015

For U.S. Children, Minorities Will Be The Majority By 2020, Census Says

The Census Bureau predicts shifts in the U.S. over the coming years, with a more diverse — and older — population.
U.S. Census Bureau

America is heading toward the day when whites will no longer make up the majority of the population. And U.S. children will get there soon, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau report. The agency also says the overall U.S. population will grow older — and grow more slowly — in coming years.

By around 2020, "more than half of the nation's children are expected to be part of a minority race or ethnic group," the Census Bureau says, putting Americans under the age of 18 at the front of a trend that will see the overall population follow suit some 20 years later.

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Goats and Soda
6:03 am
Wed March 4, 2015

Watch A Film From Mali: The Day Before The Music Died

Malian guitarist Vieux Farka Touré.
Courtesy of Kiley Kraskouskas

Originally published on Wed March 4, 2015 9:44 am

Just its title has an ominous sense of finality: The Last Song Before the War.

The documentary by Kiley Kraskouskas presents the 2011 Festival in the Desert, a showcase for Mali's incredible musicians that had been held underneath the stars outside of Timbuktu for 12 years. Ten months after the joyous celebration depicted in the film, Islamic extremists took over that part of the country. Among the horrors inflicted by the occupiers was a total ban on music.

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