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NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Security Situation In Eastern Ukraine Worsens

The security situation in Eastern Ukraine is becoming increasing confused. In some of the towns where pro-Moscow militants have occupied government buildings, it is clear that someone is organizing things and giving orders. In other places, a state of near chaos reigns with drunken gunmen replacing Kiev's authority.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Legal Battle Over Affirmative Action Continues

Steve Inskeep talks to Columbia University president Lee Bollinger about the Supreme Court's most recent decision to uphold Michigan's affirmative action ban. Bollinger was president at the University of Michigan during the groundbreaking 2003 Supreme Court Affirmative Action Cases.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

How Hospitals Can Reduce Disabilities For Stroke Patients

Research finds when hospitals initiate rapid response programs to treat stroke victims, response time is cut and fewer patients die and fewer have significant disability.

NPR Story
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Urban Libraries Become De Facto Homeless Shelters

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 4:20 am

San Francisco's library system has hired a full-time social worker to help find housing and other services for the homeless men and women who've set up camp among the stacks.

Education
3:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

At preschools in Tulsa, Okla., teachers are well-educated and well-paid, and classrooms are focused on play, but are still challenging. One nonprofit in Tulsa, the Community Action Project, has flipped the script on preschool. The idea behind its Career Advance program is simple: To help kids, the group believes, you often have to help their parents.

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Education
3:03 am
Wed April 23, 2014

One Approach To Head Start: To Help Kids, Help Their Parents

Tiffany Contreras walks her daughter Kyndall, 4, to preschool at Disney Elementary in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

President Obama has called repeatedly on Congress to help states pay for "high-quality preschool" for all. In fact, those two words — "high quality" — appear time and again in the president's prepared remarks. They are also a refrain among early childhood education advocates and researchers. But what do they mean? And what separates the best of the nation's preschool programs from the rest?

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Europe
2:34 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Putin's Chess Moves In Ukraine: Brilliant Tactics, But Bad Strategy?

Protesters play chess in Independence Square in Kiev last winter. Some would say that Russian President Putin is playing geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:23 am

The game of chess is a national pastime in Russia. And you might say that Vladimir Putin is playing a high-stakes game of geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.

Western leaders are plotting how to counter Putin's latest moves with economic sanctions. So to get some insight into what might come next, we talked to an economist who knows Russia — who is also extremely good at chess.

Putin Playing From A Weak Position

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All Tech Considered
2:33 am
Wed April 23, 2014

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

A Google data center in Oklahoma is shown. Google recently slashed prices for its cloud services; Amazon responded by cutting its cloud prices.
Connie Zhou AP

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:23 am

This week, our tech reporting team is exploring cloud computing — the big business of providing computing power and data storage that companies need, but which happens out of sight, as if it's "in the cloud."

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U.S.
2:31 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Subminimum Wages For The Disabled: Godsend Or Exploitation?

Workers shrink wrap products at the Sertoma Centre located just outside of Chicago.
Courtesy of Sertoma Centre

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 3:23 am

The president recently signed an executive order raising the minimum hourly wage to $10.10 for workers employed by federal contractors — including those with disabilities.

That's a victory for disabled workers who can make just pennies per hour at so-called sheltered workplaces.

While some call sheltered workshops a godsend, others say they are examples of good intentions gone wrong.

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Around the Nation
2:30 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Race To Unearth Civil War-Era Artifacts Before Developer Digs In

Archaeologist Chester DePratter stands by the site of Camp Asylum, the Civil War-era prison in Columbia, S.C. The site will soon be cleared to make room for a mixed-use development.
Susanne Schafer AP

About a dozen or so archaeologists in downtown Columbia, S.C. are focused on a 165-acre sliver of land that used to be a prisoner of war camp during the Civil War. Last summer, the property was sold and the group is trying to recover as many artifacts as they can before a developer builds condos and shops in its place.

"We're out here to salvage what we can in advance of that development," says Chester DePratter, a University of South Carolina archaeologist.

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