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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Sat November 16, 2013

U.S. Soldier Accused Of Murder In Deaths Of Deaf Iraqi Boys

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 2:13 pm

A U.S. Army sergeant who in 2007 allegedly shot and killed two unarmed deaf Iraqi boys who had no known ties to the insurgents then battling American forces, has now been charged with two counts of premeditated murder.

The story of what Sgt. 1st Class Michael Barbera allegedly did was spelled out in detail last December by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. An online version of the newspaper's 8-page report is posted here. It began its package of stories this way:

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Princeton Meningitis Cases Spur Emergency Import Of Vaccine

Princeton University's Nassau Hall.
DANIEL HULSHIZER AP

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 1:48 pm

A seventh case since March of bacterial meningitis among students at New Jersey's Princeton University has federal health officials considering the use of "an emergency vaccine," The Star-Ledger writes.

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Music Interviews
10:03 am
Sat November 16, 2013

'Something That Is Very Real For Me': Ted Nash Completes His 'Chakra'

Ted Nash's new album, Chakra, is out now.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 3:29 pm

Working as a jazz musician in the 21st century is difficult enough, but hardly anybody tries to make a go of it with a big band anymore. Yet that's exactly what Ted Nash does on his latest album, Chakra.

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The Two-Way
9:49 am
Sat November 16, 2013

As He Retires, Cricket Superstar Gets India's Highest Honor

Students in Ahmadabad, India, honored cricket superstar Sachin Tendulkar in their own way earlier this week.
Siddharaj Solanki AP

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 1:42 pm

Indian cricket superstar Sachin Tendulkar has indeed left the pitch for the last time, now that his national team's match against the West Indies is over (India won easily, 495-182).

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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sat November 16, 2013

How Reporters Deal With Dark News

Ivan Watson
CNN

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 12:04 pm

The daily news is rife with treachery and danger: multiple wars, simmering revolutions, natural and unnatural disasters and random acts of violence. It's enough to make one curl up in a fetal position and avoid the outside world altogether.

But what about those people whose job is to gather and deliver all of that dark news? What does the constant onslaught of terrible tidings do to someone's state of mind?

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Suicide Bombing Causes Multiple Deaths In Afghanistan

An Afghan police officer stands near some of the wreckage after Saturday's suicide bombing in Kabul.
Anja Niedringhaus AP

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 1:37 pm

A suicide bombing Saturday in Kabul, Afghanistan, near the site where elders will meet next week to debate a security pact with the U.S. caused multiple deaths and injuries, NPR's Sean Carberry tells our Newscast Desk.

He reports that:

"The huge blast destroyed cars and shops and scattered debris for more than 100 yards. Witnesses describe seeing injured and dead civilians being pulled from the scene. Afghan officials claim the bomber was under surveillance and exploded his vehicle when stopped at the checkpoint."

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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Sat November 16, 2013

How'd They Do That? Jean-Claude Van Damme's 'Epic Split'

The easy part: Actor Jean-Claude Van Damme before the trucks started backing up and he did his "epic split."
Volvo Trucks

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 1:31 pm

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The Two-Way
6:28 am
Sat November 16, 2013

Estimate Of Number Left Homeless By Typhoon Soars

Patients injured during Typhoon Haiyan lie in the halls of the Divine Word Hospital in Tacloban, the Philippines. Despite severe damage to the ground floor and the loss of the roof, the staff of the hospital keep treating patients.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 3:05 pm

Update at 4:55 p.m. ET. Estimate Of Those Displaced Soars:

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History
5:45 am
Sat November 16, 2013

How JFK Fathered The Modern Presidential Campaign

John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, campaign in New York in 1960.
AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 1:33 pm

When John F. Kennedy began his run for the White House more than 50 years ago, there was plenty of excitement and anticipation. He was energetic, handsome and from a famous Boston political family.

But his candidacy was far from a sure bet. At the time, few would have predicted the lasting impact his campaign would have on every election to follow.

Recognizing The Power Of TV

Kennedy made the most of his youth and novelty, says historian Robert Dallek, author of several books about JFK.

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Parallels
5:43 am
Sat November 16, 2013

African Migrants Find An Uneasy Asylum In Israel

Philip Giray came from Eritrea to Israel two years ago. He is one of some 60,000 migrants living in Israel.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 6:22 am

The scissors never seem to stop in Sami's barber shop off a pedestrian street in south Tel Aviv.

Fresh out of the barber's chair, Philip Giray says he left Eritrea two years ago. Smugglers helped the 20-year-old cross into Sudan and Egypt. Then he snuck into Israel.

"We come here, we ask asylum here, they doesn't welcome us," Giray says. "They punish us psychological, you know?"

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