Beth Anne Austein

Host and Producer

Beth Anne Austein has been spinning tunes on the air (The Folk Show, Dancing With Tradition, Freeforms), as well as recording, editing and mixing audio for Montana Public Radio and Montana PBS, since the Clinton Administration. She’s jockeyed faders or "fixed it in post” for The Plant Detective; Listeners Bookstall; Fieldnotes; Musicians Spotlight; The Write Question; Storycorps; Selected Shorts; Bill Raoul’s music series; orchestral and chamber concerts; lecture series; news interviews; and outside producers’ programs about topics ranging from philosophy to ticks.

Ways to Connect

Flickr user, Jewel 'o the Desert

Jon recalls driving through Castroville, CA ("Artichoke Center of the World") one spring, when he encountered the annual Castroville Artichoke Festival. "The artichoke, for such an unlikely-looking food item, is widespread and adapted among so many cultures and cuisines around the world, it's startling," he observes.

Brian Kahn talks with Gen. Gene Prendergast, retired adjutant general of the Montana National Guard, founder, and Jan Rouse, Executive Director of the Montana Youth Challenge Academy in Dillon, MT.

Michael Marsolek talks with Dean Peterson, Director of the Missoula Mendelssohn Club, and John Patterson, a tenor with the group for the past 31 years. Sunday, March 15 marks the group's seventieth annual spring concert, at 7:00 p.m.

This month marks the 70th anniversary of the American invasion of Iwo Jima, one of the deadliest battles in the Pacific during World War II. Producer Danielle Thomsen recently spoke with a survivor of that battle, 88 year old Paul Milam.  Milam recalls his impressions of Iwo Jima as an inexperienced 19-year-old from Bozeman, Montana.

courtesy of Linda Gryczan

Linda Gryczan served as lead plaintiff in a 1993 legal challenge to Montana's deviate sexual conduct statute, which made gay sex between consenting adults a crime.

Flickr user, Tim Pierce

"I realize that many people do not like insects. The fourth graders are almost always exuberant, though, and when it comes to nature, there are no "ewwww"s in my class! Still, I do like to give a nod to the fact that bugs are not always appreciated. There are excellent reasons for this, reasons the kids can usually figure out: mosquitoes bite; wasps sting; beetles can eat corn, fruit and potatoes; bark beetles can kill many trees and destroy forests; insects sometimes carry diseases, which can infect people and livestock; termites can eat our homes.

Clay Scott

Last week on Mountain West Voices, Haywood Big Day told the story of his name. This week he shares his thoughts on history and language, on being American, and being Crow.

(Broadcast: "Mountain West Voices," 2/23/15. Listen weekly on the radio on Mondays, 3:00 p.m., or via podcast.)

"Death and the Maiden" is the title of the February 22, 2015 performance by the String Orchestra of the Rockies. Featured violinist Maria Larionoff and double bassist Barry Lieberman founded the American String Project, a fifteen-member conductorless string orchestra that bears some resemblance to Montana's SOR.


Brian Kahn talks with faculty members Sam Koenen and Beth Stohlmann, and junior Nathan Mayville, of Petra Academy of Bozeman, MT. Petra is an accredited member of the Association of Classical and Christian Schools.

Flickr user, Miss Anna Lynn Martino

Greg gives instructions for his adaptation of an old Nantucket cranberry pecan muffin recipe. Thaw the butter, get some heavy cream and buttermilk, and hunt down your ice cream scoop.

(Broadcast: "The Food Guys," 2/22/15. Listen weekly on the radio at 11:50 a.m. Sundays, or via podcast.)

Cranberry Pecan Muffins