Beth Anne Austein

Host and Producer

Beth Anne Austein has been spinning tunes on the air (The Folk Show, Dancing With Tradition, Freeforms), as well as recording, editing and mixing audio for Montana Public Radio and Montana PBS, since the Clinton Administration. She’s jockeyed faders or "fixed it in post” for The Plant Detective; Listeners Bookstall; Fieldnotes; Musicians Spotlight; The Write Question; Storycorps; Selected Shorts; Bill Raoul’s music series; orchestral and chamber concerts; lecture series; news interviews; and outside producers’ programs about topics ranging from philosophy to ticks.

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The Plant Detective
5:00 am
Sat November 8, 2014

Garlic I: Asia's Gift To The Future

Wild garlic. (CC BY-NC 2.0)
Credit Flickr user Mark Robinson

Ever since nomadic tribes helped spread wild garlic from Central Asia to far-flung parts of the globe, garlic has helped humans fight microbes. Louis Pasteur recognized its antimicrobial power, as did doctors in WWI and WWII battlefield hospitals, where injured soldiers were given garlic to prevent infection and gangrene. Today's warnings of a "post-antibiotic" future mean garlic's power may turn out to be handy as drug-resistant bacteria become widespread.

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Field Notes
4:28 pm
Fri November 7, 2014

Martens And Fishers, Elusive Carnivores Of Montana's Old-Growth Forests

American marten (Martes americana)
Credit United States Fish and Wildlife Service

Walking around old-growth forests this winter, if you're lucky enough to see fur-lined tracks leading to the base of a tree, or scat containing porcupine quills, look up. Scan the treetops. You might catch a glimpse of a marten or a fisher, two members of the mustelid family that roam Montana's winter landscape.

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Home Ground Radio
5:00 am
Wed November 5, 2014

Public Health In Montana

When we think of "health," we often think about the well-being of an individual. But Lindsey Krywaruchka, Emily Epperson, and George Burns work on behalf of a different definition of "health:" the well-being of an entire human population. All three work in the public health programs of Montana's Department of Public Health and Human Services.

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Reflections West
5:00 am
Wed November 5, 2014

Tessa Heinemann & Marjorie Manwaring

Marjorie Manwaring
Credit courtesy of Mayapple Press

Tessa Heinemann loves digging up history. On an archaeological dig in the old gold-mining town, Virginia City, MT, she discovered 150-year-old remnants of toys, jewelry, and medicine bottles. "I find it incredibly rewarding to transform the experience of casual tourists. They hold artifacts in their hands and begin to imagine the bustling streets of a real community."

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Mountain West Voices
5:00 am
Wed November 5, 2014

Pardosa: A Conversation with a Montana Feminist, Arachnologist, and Artist

Dr. Bea Vogel, Helena, MT
Credit Clay Scott

Montana arachnologist, artist and feminist Dr. Bea Vogel has studied and worked all over the U.S., but found her way back to Helena, Montana: "(Some people) feel that they're owned by where they live. I've always felt that way: I'm of Montana; I need to be here. This is just about my idea of paradise."

(Broadcast: "Mountain West Voices," 11/5/14. Listen Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., or via podcast.)

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Musician's Spotlight
5:00 am
Tue November 4, 2014

Philip Aaberg

Credit courtesy of Phil Aaberg

Pianist and composer Philip Aaberg has played with the Boston Pops, at the Marlboro Chamber Music Festival, and with pop and blues musicians like Peter Gabriel, Elvin Bishop, and the Doobie Brothers. His piano playing is featured on more than 200 recordings by other artists. But Aaberg acknowledges his Montana "Hi-line" origins with pride. Not only does he live in the town where he grew up, but until late in her life, he continued studying with his early piano teacher.

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Home Ground Radio
5:00 am
Mon November 3, 2014

Deep Springs College: Reading Hegel, Cutting Hay

Driving cattle, Deep Springs College
Credit courtesy of Deep Springs College

Nearly one hundred years ago, L.L. Nunn, an electrical pioneer and the manager of a Colorado power company, founded a two-year college for young men in California's Deep Springs Valley. Deep Springs College isn't the typical American junior college: it's tiny, with just twenty-six students. No one pays tuition or fees.  It's located on a remote cattle ranch and alfalfa farm. The student-faculty ratio is 5:1.

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Front Row Center
5:00 am
Sun November 2, 2014

"No Time For Love" Makes Time For Kalispell's KM Theater

Michael Marsolek talks with Kathy Witkowsky and Linda Grinde, playwright and director of a new comedy, "No Time For Love." Inspired by a real-life evening spent trying to communicate with a friend obsessed with texting his love interest, Witkowsky describes the plot of "No Time For Love" as "taking that theme to ridiculous extremes. The main character finds herself frustrated as she tries to have authentic relationships with people who are constantly being pulled in many directions."

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The Food Guys
5:00 am
Sun November 2, 2014

GMO Crops And Chemical Manufacturers' Profits

Spraying pesticides (CC-BY-2.0)
Credit Dave Hitchborne

Greg and Jon follow up on a previous "Food Guys" show about a controversial study linking genetically-modified (GMO) corn to cancer in lab rats. This time they're onto the economic connection between GMO crops and the market for pesticides.

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The Plant Detective
5:00 am
Sat November 1, 2014

Demand For Slippery Elm's Gummy Bark Tempts Poachers

Slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) (CC BY-NC 2.0)
Credit Flickr user, Kent McFarland

In 1905, author Harriet Keeler wrote about the inner bark of the slippery elm tree: “It is thick, fragrant, mucilaginous, demulcent, and nutritious. The water in which the bark has been soaked is a grateful drink for one suffering from affections of the throat and lungs.”

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