Beth Anne Austein

Host and Producer

Beth Anne Austein has been spinning tunes on the air (The Folk Show, Dancing With Tradition, Freeforms), as well as recording, editing and mixing audio for Montana Public Radio and Montana PBS, since the Clinton Administration. She’s jockeyed faders or "fixed it in post” for The Plant Detective; Listeners Bookstall; Fieldnotes; Musicians Spotlight; The Write Question; Storycorps; Selected Shorts; Bill Raoul’s music series; orchestral and chamber concerts; lecture series; news interviews; and outside producers’ programs about topics ranging from philosophy to ticks.

Ways To Connect

Courtesy Photo

This interview first aired in April 2013, sixteen months before Curtis was chosen to replace John Walsh as Montana's Democratic nominee in the 2014 U.S. Senate election.

Hilary Hahn

Sep 23, 2014
IMG Artists

Grammy Award-winning violinist Hilary Hahn discusses her most recent recording, "In 27 Pieces," which is the culmination of a multi-year project. Hahn commissioned 26 composers from around the world to write short-form works, suitable for use by violinists as performance encores.

Dewey Vanderhoff

Carrie La Seur is a seventh generation descendant of homesteaders who came to Montana in 1864. As a child, Carrie was enthralled by stories of Montana life in the 19th and early 20th centuries. But her adult life as a lawyer has created a deep divide. To try to resolve it, she wrote a novel.

(Broadcast: Home Ground Radio, 9/23/14)

Likeable Leeks

Sep 21, 2014
Thor

Greg and Jon list reasons to like leeks: they're pretty; they're full of Vitamin K; the extra parts are useful for making vegetable stock; they're half of the classic recipe for potato-leek soup; they're good braised in broth or sautéed with olive oil and garlic, which could be the starting point for a pasta sauce; they're good baked with mushrooms in tarts. The Turks fry them and the Scots use them for cock-a-leekie soup.

(Broadcast: The Food Guys, 9/21/14)

Potato & Leek Soup recipe:

Flickr user, Ali Graney

The causes of migraine aren't well understood. Neither is the mechanism behind feverfew's proven ability to stop or prevent a migraine headache. Feverfew supplements used in clinical studies to treat migraine contain a standardized dose of 0.2 to 0.35% parthenolide, so if you research this herb, pay attention to dosage details.  Pregnant women and children under the age of two shouldn't use it, and people with allergies to ragweed, chamomile and yarrow are sometimes allergic to feverfew.

Jared Tarbell

"Lichens," written by Ted Morrison, read by Caroline Kurtz.

"As I belayed my partner up to the ledge, I examined the colorful world on the rock in front of me. The closer I looked, the more I saw. The small cracks in the mat of lichen surged like huge crevasses in a microworld, curving and breaking with the topography of the rough granite. The small polygons of green were flecked by a multitude of browns and grays.

Michael Marsolek talks with Helena Symphony Music Director, Allan R. Scott, about the Symphony's 60th anniversary season, which opens Saturday, September 20th, 2014, 7:00 p.m., at the Helena Civic Center.

Clay Scott

We meet Kayla Murchison along the Continental Divide Trail in Montana, 4 1/2 months and 2800 miles into her quest to traverse the spine of the continent from Mexico to Canada.

(Broadcast: Mountain West Voices, 9/17/14)

LaVerne Harrell Clark, The University of Arizona Poetry Center

When writing about literature, teacher and author Robert Stubblefield sticks to the present tense, since "great literature never slides off into the past, but remains with us in an eternal present." Stubblefield's friend and colleague, author James Welch, creates a world in his historical novel Fools Crow "as clear and present as the gray vapor of our breath against the darkness."

Mister S

Sep 16, 2014

Razmick Sarkissian came to Wyoming via Armenia, Iran and Calcutta. For the last thirty years he has taught music in Sheridan, Wyoming, bringing his students "joy in learning, truth in learning."

(Broadcast: Mountain West Voices, 9/10/14)

courtesy of the Regional Learning Project, University of Montana

Bryony Schwan talks with Dr. Sally Thompson, an archaeologist, ethnographer and ethnohistorian who long ago forged connections with indigenous North Americans that re-defined the philosophy and nature of her work. Recently, Sally spent time in Ladakh, in the northeast Himalaya region of India, where ancient medicine and lifeways are colliding with modernity.

Trevor Rogers

Sep 16, 2014

The Clumsy Lovers’ songwriter and lead vocalist Trevor Rogers visited host John Floridis to discuss his recent solo recording, Are You Happy Now? Rogers talked about balancing recording and touring with his  full-time gig as a father and husband, as well as the impact on his songwriting from the years he spent living in Missoula.

(Broadcast: Musicians' Spotlight,  9/16/14)

In the midst of rapid change, history can seem so...out of date. But a visit with Jennifer Bottomly-O'Looney and Kirby Lambert at the Montana Historical Society shows why it matters.

(Broadcast: Home Ground Radio, 9/16/14)

Muhammad Mahdi Karim

"The Food Guys" - Jon Jackson and Greg Patent - consider Colony Collapse Disorder, the recent large-scale disappearance of European honey bees, both wild and managed.

Michael Marsolek talks with Fern Glass Boyd, artistic director of the String Orchestra of the Rockies, about the concerts opening the S.O.R.'s 30th season. Sept. 21st and 22nd, the String Orchestra's performances in Missoula and Seeley Lake feature frequent guest soloist and collaborator, cellist Amit Peled. This concert marks Peled's fifth performance with the S.O.R.

Goldenseal II

Sep 13, 2014

Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) grows in eastern North America, where it's now threatened in the wild. An alkaloid in goldenseal, berberine, shows powerful antimicrobial effects against a wide range of bacteria, yeasts, and parasites. Herbalists prescribed goldenseal to stimulate the immune system, fight infection, and treat diarrhea.

(Podcast: The Plant Detective, 9/13/14)

Mint Evolution

Sep 12, 2014
Flickr user, Dendroica cerulea

"Mint Evolution," by David Kerber.

During summer trips in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, Tammy Elser, the daughter of an outfitter, learned to love camp coffee. Poet Luci Tapahonso's Navajo uncle drinks coffee from the red can, too:

Shelby Lynne

Sep 9, 2014

John Floridis talks with Grammy and CMA Award-winner Shelby Lynne about her personal and frequently biographical songs. Her fan base spans a wide range of musical audiences, a testament to her broad appeal. The interview was recorded in Bigfork, Montana as part of the Crown of The Continent Guitar Festival.

(Broadcast: Musicians' Spotlight, 9/9/14)

Ann Szalda-Petree interviews Dr. Elizabeth Kohlstaedt, chief clinical officer of Intermountain of Helena, about residential treatment for abused and neglected children. Dr. Kohlstaedt describes the complexities of treating children who need help learning how to have healthy relationships.  

(This show aired on Montana Public Radio on March 12th, 2013.  Thanks to Clark Grant for producing.

Women's HIstory Matters

2014 marks the hundredth anniversary of women’s suffrage in Montana. How did Montana's non-native women win the right to vote from an all-male legislature, six years before equal suffrage was achieved nationwide?  Martha Kohl, historical specialist with the Montana Historical Society, details the strategies, struggles, and unexpected outcomes (think women bootleggers) of suffrage.

You can read much more about women's history in Martha's online project, Women’s History Matters.

Chris R. Sims

Greg and Jon discuss two cooking projects that Greg reserves for summer: levain breads (all-sourdough, with no other added yeast), and fermented rice and/or rice wine. In both projects, temperature is key to the fermentation process. When preparing levain bread, Greg prefers a 73 - 75 degree F kitchen and ingredients whose temperature has been carefully adjusted to create at 78 degree F dough.

Michael Marsolek talks with Greg Johnson, Artistic Director of the Montana Repertory Theatre, about the Rep's production of Broomstick, a one-woman play by John Biguenet, starring Salina Chatlain. The Montana premier of Broomstick is one of four national productions of the play sponsored by the National New Play Network, an alliance of non-profit theaters championing new plays. Here's how the NNPN describes it:

Goldenseal I

Sep 6, 2014

There's a persistent urban legend concerning the herb,  goldenseal: take it before a urine test and you'll get false-negative results for a variety of recreational drugs. Disappointingly for those who try, goldenseal won't mask drug residues in the blood. The idea came from Stringtown on the Pike, a novel published in 1900 by plant pharmacist John Uri Lloyd. In the book, goldenseal causes a false-positive result for strychnine poisoning.

(Podcast: The Plant Detective, 9/6/14)

Ravens At Play

Sep 5, 2014
Niccolò Caranti

"Ravens At Play," written by Michael K. Schwartz, read by Caroline Kurtz.

Clay Scott

The first of several stories in a series looking at the "war brides" who came to the United States by the thousands at the end of World War II. Joyce Vashro, now of Helena, Montana, looks back on the tumultuous years when she and her fellow "Land Girls" (volunteer female farm workers) had whirlwind romances with men they knew they might not see again.

(Broadcast: Mountain West Voices, 9/3/14)

Madelyn Beck

In the drilling sites and "man camps" of North Dakota's oil fields, women can seem like fictional beings.  But you don't really need to look far to find women living and working in the Bakken oil patch. In small towns near drilling rigs, women and teenagers perform essential jobs. Some are native to the region, while others moved there independently or with partners, looking for work. These women keep the towns moving and sometimes even venture onto the oil fields to do a "man's" work.

Tom Mulvaney collection

Early in the twentieth century, long before Twitter, people sent snippets of news back and forth on penny postcards, sometimes transferring their own photos onto the front. In his book, Penny Postcards and Prairie Flowers, Philip Burgess has collected the postcards exchanged between his homesteading grandmother and great-aunt in Montana and their Norwegian immigrant family in Minnesota.

"Dismiss labels. Forget trying to fit into a scene. Be true and play your songs." It’s an accurate self-description by the Grammy-nominated bluegrass expansionists, The Infamous Stringdusters. Comfortable as they are in their own collective skin, the title of the group's new album, "Let It Go," works equally well as their slogan.

(Broadcast: Musician's Spotlight, 6/3/14 &  9/2/14)

Hunter J. Causey

Wildlife biologist Doug Chadwick, author of numerous books and articles about natural history and conservation, and longtime resident of grizzly bear habitat in Montana, describes himself as a "bear groupie."  Ursos arctos gobiensis, a Gobi Desert sub-species of grizzly bear,

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