MTPR

Brie Ripley

Brie Ripley got her start at KUOW Public Radio in Seattle as a work-study student in 2013. She graduated with her degree in Journalism and Anthropology from the University of Washington and began freelancing. Her work has appeared on KNKX Seattle’s “Sound Effect;” KUOW Public Radio’s “The Record,” “Speakers Forum,” and “Local Wonder;” and in the multi-station project, “American Homefront.” Ripley produces the grant-funded radio documentary series “Tie My Tubes” and derives her passion for radio reporting from listening to "This American Life" and reading the works of Tom Robbins while growing up. She moved to Billings in the summer of 2016.

Cause Of Statewide Canine Respiratory Disease Still Unknown
(PD)

The Department of Livestock and local veterinarians are monitoring an outbreak of severe canine respiratory disease in Montana.

Veterinarians in Bozeman, Livingston, Billings, Butte, Big Timber, Roundup and Red Lodge have reported seeing dogs with coughing, difficulty breathing and fever.

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument.
Bureau of Land Management

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke will decide whether to shrink or eliminate 22 national monuments later this month. As Yellowstone Public Radio’s Brie Ripley reports, these monuments are significant money-makers for business owners across the West, who met in Helena and Great Falls Wednesday to discuss their concerns.

In Montana outdoor recreation generates nearly $6 billion in consumer spending annually, and supports over 60,000 jobs.

Montana State University-Northern awarded a professor $50,000 to settle a racial discrimination complaint she filed against the school. The University did not admit guilt, but nonetheless agreed to pay the professor.

Adjunct professor Yvonne Tiger, who’s Native American, filed the complaint in July 2016.

Just months after settling a lawsuit over a sexual assault case, U.S. immigration officials today in Billings detained, and plan to deport, a man who entered the U.S. illegally.

The father of eight moved to Montana 20 years ago, and had no problem with customs – until now.

Esteemed by Comedy Central as one of the best stand-up comics of all time, Paula Poundstone is perhaps best known in the radio world for her regular appearances on the NPR comedy quiz show, Wait… Wait… Don’t Tell Me!

Fresh on the heels of the release of her new memoir, The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness, Poundstone will be in Bozeman Fri. Aug. 11 to perform standup at the Ellen Theatre.

Weather, fuel, and topography all affect wildfire behavior—and changes in any one of them can greatly impact the way firefighters work the fire lines.

It’s up to incident meteorologists and fire behavior analysts to help firefighters understand the nature of the particular fire they are battling, and how best to contain it quickly and safely.

A retardant drop on the Lodgepole Complex, July 23, 2017.
Inciweb

The Garfield County Sheriff is lifting the evacuations for property owners in the Lodgepole Complex Fire area. That’s thanks to more favorable weather conditions that have allowed firefighters from 34 states to make some progress on trying to contain the massive 390 square mile fire.

Brie Ripley interviews YPR reporter Nate Hegyi who is onsite at the Lodgepole Complex fire, the largest wildfire in the country at 353 sq. miles.

A coal power plant owes $2 million in property taxes to Big Horn County in southern Montana.

Billings Gazette reporter Matt Hudson has been following this story for nearly a year, and shares insights on the latest in late payments.

Interim Indian Health Service Director Rear Admiral Michael Weahkee
YouTube

Montana’s Democratic Senator Jon Tester wants to know how the Trump administration’s proposed 2018 federal budget will affect the Indian Health Service.

So, on Wednesday Tester turned to the troubled agency’s new acting director, Rear Admiral Michael Weahkee for answers.

It didn’t go well.

Weahkee could not explain how much money IHS is billing Medicaid to help keep the agency running.

The Wolf Point School District is facing a complaint of discrimination against its Native American students for the second time in the past 15 years. Last week, the Fort Peck Tribes filed what’s called a Title VI complaint with the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education on behalf of their children.

Yellowstone Public Radio’s Brie Ripley and Montana Public Radio’s Nicky Ouellet team up to bring us this story.

Steven Lewis Simpson is a white, European filmmaker telling a story about Native Americans through his latest film screening now across Montana.

“Neither Wolf Nor Dog” is adapted from the 1994 best-selling novel by author Kent Nerburn. It's about a white writer who gets sucked into life on reservations in the Dakotas by the late Lakota Chief, Dave Bald Eagle, whose people were killed in the Wounded Knee Massacre of 1890. Brie Ripley spoke with the filmmaker about the complexities of telling a story that isn’t yours.  

Gabriel Night Shield decided to make the podcast Urban Indianz after growing frustrated with the way he sees Native Americans portrayed in mass media.

New terms for small solar projects across Montana might have been knowingly set to discourage development. That's based on a conversation caught on a hot mic last week during a mid-session break for a Public Service Commission meeting.


Big Sky Pride transformed Billings into an epicenter of glitter, rainbows, music and solidarity between LGBTQI+-identifying folks and straight allies over the weekend.

Big Sky Pride kicks off today in Billings. It’s the first time in nine years that the state’s annual pride festivities will take place in our region’s largest urban center. YPR’s Brie Ripley spoke with members of the festival planning committee about the festival’s history and what folks can expect from this weekend’s celebration.

For time immemorial, political and social happenings often fuel folks prone to fiery bursts of creativity. For full-time party DJ and producer Nick Ferrington, who's also known as DJ Nick Minaj, the audio of Greg Gianforte assaulting reporter Ben Jacobs sparked the brand new dance track Gianforte (Bodyslam).


*Updated Thurs. 5/25 at 2:30 p.m. 

GOP Candidate Greg Gianforte faces misdemeanor assault charges for "body slamming" a reporter for The Guardian at his campaign headquarters last night, on the eve of today’s special election to fill Montana’s lone U.S. House Seat. He must appear in Gallatin County Justice Court by June 7. 

Crime reporter Whitney Bermes for the Bozeman Daily Chronicle first heard the assault report on a police scanner, as she was packing up to leave the newsroom and go home for the evening.

Marchers, including Sen. Steve Daines, in the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women’s Walk in Lame Deer, Montana May 5, 2017.
Courtesy Sen. Steve Daines

U.S. Justice Department data shows Native women are 10 times as likely to be murdered as other Americans. They’re four times as likely to be raped or sexually assaulted.

“It is a human tragedy and it's also a stain on these United States; on the consciousness of this country that allows this to continue to happen,” says Jacqueline Agtuca with the Lame Deer-based National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center.

The ACLU Montana is investigating a human rights complaint at Montana State University-Northern in Havre. The Sweetgrass Society, a Native American student group, says there’s a deeper issue on campus—and it's been going on for months.


The last time Abenayaa (Abena) Lane was told to return to her "home country" was just before the presidential election in the fall.

She was shopping at a Walmart in Billings while wearing a head scarf, her hijab, when someone told her that when Trump becomes president, she will need to leave the Big Sky State.

Lane is a soldier in the U.S. Army studying sociology and criminal justice at MSU Billings. She told YPR’s Brie Ripley about one of the first times she felt unwanted in America for being Muslim. 


The Northern Cheyenne tribe, along with a coalition of conservation groups, sued the Trump administration Wednesday for lifting a moratorium on coal leases on public lands.

The southeastern Montana tribe filed the lawsuit in response to Interior Secretary Zinke’s decision to lift the moratorium on coal leasing.

The Billings Gazette reports that over the last five years, Yellowstone County, the largest county in the state, prosecuted only about 15% of adult rape cases. And last year, there were precisely zero prosecutions out of the 60 rape cases reported in the county.

Jon Krakauer is the author of the bestselling book Missoula: Rape and the Justice System In a College Town which, explores a spate of unprosecuted sexual assaults in one of Montana's largest cities between 2008-2012.

Krakauer spoke with YPR's Brie Ripley about why Yellowstone County needs a Department of Justice intervention.

Matt Powell-Palm was notified the Senator was going to arrive in Bozeman last Friday afternoon on Facebook through a group called The Gallatin Progressive Action Network.

He wanted face to face time with Senator Daines, something he says the Senator has not given his Montanan constituents enough of lately.

25-years-ago, a New York Times reporter traveled to Montana to interview Gwen Kircher for a story on race in America.

Based on award winning journalist Dirk Johnson's original article, and in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, YPR's Brie Ripley shares this audio postcard on what life's like, presently, for a black woman in a predominately white state.