Chérie Newman

Host and Producer

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at PRX.org and MTPR.org.

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways To Connect

Los Angeles Times and NPR film critic Kenneth Turan talks about and reads from his book Not To Be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film.

Lentil Underground

Mar 18, 2015

Forty years ago, corporate agribusiness launched a campaign to push small grain farmers to modernize or perish, or as Nixon Administration Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz put it, to “get big or get out. But twenty-seven year-old David Oien decided to take a stand. When he dropped out of grad school to return to his family’s 280 acre farm, Oien became the first in his conservative Montana county to seed his fields with a radically different crop: organic lentils.  

Alexander Steinhof

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Ethan Zimmerman.

Malcolm Brooks talks about researching and writing his debut novel, Painted Horses.

About the book:

Catherine Lemay is a young archeologist on her way to Montana, with a huge task before her—a canyon “as deep as the devil’s own appetites.”

Kevin Trotman

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Geoff Badenach.

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Frances Abbey.

“What is the worst that can happen?” she asked herself. “Humiliation? Dad’s disownment ?  Those are possibilities but not in the same category as being beaten, or thrown in jail.”

Spokane author Sharma Shields talks about and reads from her novel The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac.

"The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac is deeply strange and strangely moving. Like Kafka's The Metamorphosis, it demands and rewards surrender."

— Richard Russo

About the book:

Emanuela Franchini

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Joanna Pocock.

The next time you drive through central or eastern Montana, look around. One of the farmers you see might be involved in a revolution.

Liz Carlisle is the author of a new book titled, Lentil Underground: Renegade Farmers and the Future of Food in America. She spent many months talking to Montana farmers about their revolt against corporate agribusiness, which has been going on for nearly three decades.

MTPR's Chérie Newman asked Liz how the Lentil Underground got its name.

Rafter Bard Morgans https://www.flickr.com/photos/rafterbardmorgans

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Marged Bernstein.

It's barely 5 a.m. and Tess is outside talking to the moon backlighting the movie set that is rural Montana's Hi-Line.

“Damn cowboys,” she says, thinking about how Billy had dumped her.

S.M. Hulse talks about the characters in her debut novel Black River. She also reads passages from the book.

About the book:

Tambako the Jaguar, https://www.flickr.com/photos/tambako

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Geoffrey Taylor.

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Derin Dorsett.

The weight above her eyebrows felt heavier and heavier, creating a deep wrinkle.

“Are you mad?” her daughters teased her and giggled.

The joy from those giggles didn’t erase the furrow.

Jessie Close talks about and reads from her memoir, Resilience: Two Sisters And A Story Of Mental Illness.

About the book:

For our 50th Anniversary Short Fiction Contest, we asked you to send a 700-word, or less, story in which Montana Public Radio is mentioned in some way. We'll be accepting entries until March 15, 2015. Winners will be announced in April. This story is by Mark Leichliter.

The Myrna Loy Center presents contemporary media and performing arts; supports the creation of new works by Montana, regional and national artists; and nurtures a lifelong involvement in the arts through arts education and residencies.

Upcoming performances include Mayhem Poets, Marcy Baruch Live! and Caladh Nua.

Kim Zupan talks about his debut novel, The Ploughmen. He also talks about his writing process and reads passages from the book.

About the book:

A young sheriff and a hardened killer form an uneasy and complicated bond in this mesmerizing first novel set on the plains of Montana.

Steeped in a lonesome Montana landscape as unyielding and raw as it is beautiful, Kim Zupan's The Ploughmen is a new classic in the literature of the American West.

TEDxUMontana 2015

Feb 6, 2015

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created TEDx, local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience.

It’s film festival season in Montana. And during the next 10 days more than 150 films will be shown in venues scattered around Missoula during the Big Sky Documentary Film Festival (BSDFF). MTPR's Cherie Newman talked with Gita Saedi Keily, Executive Director of BSDFF and Doug Hawes-Davis, Director of Programming, about this year’s festival.

Molly Gloss talks about and reads from her novel Falling From Horses. She also tells what she knows about the welfare of animals that appear in movies, particularly westerns.

About the book:

I was there
as the rain
hesitated;

drizzle contemplated
itself.

I could feel
the world changing
its mind.

Until the drops
thickened into
glycerine.

Like I was there
at snow's invention.

The sound changes,
you know,
once the snowflakes
hit the ground
they decide
to rejoin

The day was wild with certainty.
For a small moment there,
I knew what matters.

Michael Marsolek talks with Gita Saedi Kiely about the 2015 Big Sky Documentary Film Festival.

Laura Pritchett talks about and reads from Stars Go Blue, a novel in which a Colorado rancher and his wife deal with his diagnosis of Alzheimer's.

About the Book:

Cinemafest In Polson

Jan 22, 2015
Courtesy Flathead Lake International Cinemafest

Downtown Polson will be a hub of activity this weekend, when more than 80 films will be shown during the 2015 Flathead Lake International Cinemafest. Some of those films will win awards. MTPR's Chérie Newman talked with two of this year’s judges, Mac Swan and David King, to find out what they want to see in a film.

Newman: Mac, as a judge, what are you looking for?

David Allan Cates talks about and reads from his latest novel, Tom Connor's Gift, about which Bryan Di Salvatore writes, "Coursing between anecdote and musing, this is a novel only grownups can understand. It is smart and ecstatic and it will break your goddamn heart."

About the book:

In Resilience, the sisters share their story of triumphing over Jessie's illness. The book is written in Jessie's voice with running commentary and an epilogue written by Glenn.

I’m Chérie Newman.

Elissa Washuta talks about and reads from her memoir, My Body is a Book of Rules.

About the book:

Bill Allard / Bill Allard

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific The Write Question programs students have listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

Award-winning nature writer Gary Ferguson talks about and reads from his memoir The Carry Home: Lessons from the American Wilderness.

About the book:

Bill Allard / Bill Allard

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific The Write Question programs students have listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

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