Chérie Newman

Producer and On-Air Host

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and on-air host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at PRX.org and MTPR.org.

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways To Connect

Malcolm Brooks talks about researching and writing his debut novel, Painted Horses.

About the book:

Eliza Wiley/Independent Record

Steve Browning went from self-absorbed teen to a lawyer working in high-level politics, law, and philanthropy. What caused the shift from self-focus to citizenship, and what was learned along the way?

Brian Kahn talks with Browning about all that and more during this episode of Home Ground Radio.

(Broadcast: Home Ground Radio, 8/12/14)

Jazz vocalist Eden Atwood talks with Michael Marsolek about music, teaching, and her appearance at St. Timothy's Summer Music Festival, Sunday, August 10, at 4 p.m.

St. Timothy’s Summer Music Festival is celebrating its 19th season at St. Timothy’s Memorial Chapel,  a superb acoustical venue located at 7000 feet with beautiful views of the Pintler Mountains and Georgetown Lake.

Los Angeles Times and NPR film critic Kenneth Turan talks about and reads from his book Not To Be Missed: Fifty-Four Favorites from a Lifetime of Film.

Smith Henderson talks about and reads from his debut novel, Fourth of July Creek.

About the book:

Publisher Allen Jones talks about "re-invigorating" Bangtail Press and three recently-released anthologies of Montana writers, the Treasure State Readers.

Montana Bookstore Readers

Montana Then And Now

Jul 16, 2014

Hear fascinating facts about Montana's 150 years as a territory and a state during this interview with Aaron Parrett, author of Montana Then And Now.

Laura Pritchett talks about and reads from Stars Go Blue, a novel in which a Colorado rancher and his wife deal with his diagnosis of Alzheimer's.

TWQ producer Chérie Newman, Barbara Theroux, manager of Fact & Fiction Bookstore in Missoula, and Zed talk about recently-published books by authors from the western U.S.

NONFICTION

How To Read the American West:  A Field Guide, by William Wycokoff

Hiking Montana:  35th Anniversary Edition, by Bill Schneider an Russ Schneider

Tom Zavitz painting

Part 3 in Notes From the Huntley Project series of radio plays by Jay Kettering.

Newspaper columnist and Montana rancher, Richard Geary, talks about rural culture then and now, and reads some of his essays.

Richard Geary is the eldest of the fourth generation to operate the family ranch in Helmville, Montana. The property was homesteaded by his great grandfather in 1867, and the original farm in Ireland is still in the family.  Richard acts as bookkeeper for the ranch, while his brother is responsible for the actual management. 

William Marcus hosts a special tribute to Joseph Brown Henry, who died at Providence St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, Montana, on June 1.

Excerpts from Henry's obituary, written by Joe Nickell:

Jungle of Bones, a children's novel by Ben Mikaelsen
WWII bomber, Papau New Guinea, children's book, Montana author

Children's author Ben Mikaelsen talks about his inspiration for Jungle of Bones and reads from the novel.

About the Book:

Dylan gets caught taking a joyride in a stolen car and shipped off to live with his ex-Marine uncle for the summer. But Uncle Todd has bigger plans for Dylan than just early-morning jogs.

Michael Marsolek talks with Monte Dolack, artist, Phillip Aaberg, musician, and Chas Van Genderen, Administrator for Montana States Parks, about free concerts planned to celebrate 75 years of Montana State Parks.

Peter Stark talks about and reads from ASTORIA: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson’s Lost Pacific Empire: A Story of Wealth, Ambition, and Survival.

About the Book:

In 1810, John Jacob Astor sent out two advance parties to settle the wild, unclaimed western coast of North America. More than half of his men died violent deaths. The others survived starvation, madness, and greed to shape the destiny of a continent.

During this program, Molly Caro May talks about her nomadic childhood and her search for a place to "be from." She also reads from her new memoir, The Map of Enough: One Woman's Search for Place.

James Lee Burke talks about his latest Dave Robicheaux crime novel, Light of the World. He also reads a passage from the book and drops a few hints about his next novel.

The music in this program was written and performed by John Floridis.

During this program, Minerva Allen talks about her role as a guardian of tribal culture. She also reads from her collection of poetry, Nakoda Sky People, and from Stories from the Elders: Nakoda Horse Society.

During this program, Josh Hanagarne talks about his memoir, The World's Strongest Librarian: A Memoir of Tourette's, Faith, Strength, and the Power of Family, an inspiring story of how a Mormon kid with Tourette’s found salvation in books and weight-lifting.

From the publisher:

Adrianne Harun talks about missing girls and women along "The Highway of Tears"' in British Columbia. And explains why she chose the color white to represent evil in her novel A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain.

About the Book:

David G. Gordon explains why we should be eating bugs and talks about some of the recipes in his book, The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook: 40 Ways to Cook Crickets, Grasshoppers, Ants, Water Bugs, Spiders, Centipedes, and Their Kin.

About the Book:

Steering With My Knees, poems by Paul Zarzyski
poetry, western author, bronc riding

During this program, Paul Zarzyski talks about and reads from his latest collections of poetry and prose, Steering With My Knees and 51: 30 Poems, 20 Lyrics, 1 Self-Interview, both published by Bangtail Press.

Including:

Walter Kirn talks about and reads from his memoir Blood Will Out: The True Story of Murder, a Mystery and a Masquerade.

About the Book:

During this program, Wyoming author Craig Johnson talks about and reads from A Serpent's Tooth, the ninth book in his Walt Longmire Mystery series, which has been adapted for TV: Longmire on the Arts & Entertainment channel.

BOOK SYNOPSIS

Links to resources and more information about the three Community Foundations featured in this program:

Flathead Community Foundation, Lucy Smith, Executive Director:  Women Who Wine, Dragon Boat Festival, philanthropist opportunities

Seeley Lake Community Foundation, Stan Nicholson and Lee Boman, Board Members:  stove changeout program, skies for kids, Norman Mclean Trail

Wyoming author Alexandra Fuller talks about and reads from her third memoir, Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness.

About the book:

Kim Fu talks about and reads from her debut novel, For Today I Am A Boy.

About the book:

Peter Huang and his sisters—elegant Adele, shrewd Helen, and Bonnie the bon vivant— grow up in a house of many secrets, then escape the confines of small-town Ontario and spread from Montreal to California to Berlin. Peter’s own journey is obstructed by playground bullies, masochistic lovers, Christian ex-gays, and the ever-present shadow of his Chinese father.

Jazzoula 2014

Mar 23, 2014

Michael Marsolek talks with Jazzoula founder Bruce Micklus and musician Jeff Stickney, who will be inducted into the Jazzoula Hall of Fame during this year's festival.

The festival runs for four nights in the parish center at St. Anthony Church. This year’s lineup includes 20-plus bands and 75 to 100 musicians playing in a nightclub-like atmosphere.

Bryce Andrews talks about his decision to move to a cattle ranch in Montana and about the memoir he wrote about his experiences there, Badluck Way. He also reads two passages from the book.

About the Book:

During this program Julie Cajune — an American Indian storyteller, educator, and actress — talks about writing the stories in her one-woman play titled “Belief.” She also describes the process of collaborating with writer and poet Jennifer Finley and stage director Linda Grinde

"Belief" is a multidimensional performance, a unique mixture of interconnected Salish women’s stories, poetry, and live music.

The music in this program was written and performed by John Floridis.

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