Chérie Newman

Host and Producer

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at PRX.org and MTPR.org.

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways To Connect

During this program, Molly Caro May talks about her nomadic childhood and her search for a place to "be from." She also reads from her new memoir, The Map of Enough: One Woman's Search for Place.

James Lee Burke talks about his latest Dave Robicheaux crime novel, Light of the World. He also reads a passage from the book and drops a few hints about his next novel.

The music in this program was written and performed by John Floridis.

During this program, Minerva Allen talks about her role as a guardian of tribal culture. She also reads from her collection of poetry, Nakoda Sky People, and from Stories from the Elders: Nakoda Horse Society.

During this program, Josh Hanagarne talks about his memoir, The World's Strongest Librarian: A Memoir of Tourette's, Faith, Strength, and the Power of Family, an inspiring story of how a Mormon kid with Tourette’s found salvation in books and weight-lifting.

From the publisher:

Adrianne Harun talks about missing girls and women along "The Highway of Tears"' in British Columbia. And explains why she chose the color white to represent evil in her novel A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain.

About the Book:

David G. Gordon explains why we should be eating bugs and talks about some of the recipes in his book, The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook: 40 Ways to Cook Crickets, Grasshoppers, Ants, Water Bugs, Spiders, Centipedes, and Their Kin.

About the Book:

Steering With My Knees, poems by Paul Zarzyski
poetry, western author, bronc riding

During this program, Paul Zarzyski talks about and reads from his latest collections of poetry and prose, Steering With My Knees and 51: 30 Poems, 20 Lyrics, 1 Self-Interview, both published by Bangtail Press.

Including:

Walter Kirn talks about and reads from his memoir Blood Will Out: The True Story of Murder, a Mystery and a Masquerade.

About the Book:

During this program, Wyoming author Craig Johnson talks about and reads from A Serpent's Tooth, the ninth book in his Walt Longmire Mystery series, which has been adapted for TV: Longmire on the Arts & Entertainment channel.

BOOK SYNOPSIS

Links to resources and more information about the three Community Foundations featured in this program:

Flathead Community Foundation, Lucy Smith, Executive Director:  Women Who Wine, Dragon Boat Festival, philanthropist opportunities

Seeley Lake Community Foundation, Stan Nicholson and Lee Boman, Board Members:  stove changeout program, skies for kids, Norman Mclean Trail

Wyoming author Alexandra Fuller talks about and reads from her third memoir, Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness.

About the book:

Kim Fu talks about and reads from her debut novel, For Today I Am A Boy.

About the book:

Peter Huang and his sisters—elegant Adele, shrewd Helen, and Bonnie the bon vivant— grow up in a house of many secrets, then escape the confines of small-town Ontario and spread from Montreal to California to Berlin. Peter’s own journey is obstructed by playground bullies, masochistic lovers, Christian ex-gays, and the ever-present shadow of his Chinese father.

Jazzoula 2014

Mar 23, 2014

Michael Marsolek talks with Jazzoula founder Bruce Micklus and musician Jeff Stickney, who will be inducted into the Jazzoula Hall of Fame during this year's festival.

The festival runs for four nights in the parish center at St. Anthony Church. This year’s lineup includes 20-plus bands and 75 to 100 musicians playing in a nightclub-like atmosphere.

Bryce Andrews talks about his decision to move to a cattle ranch in Montana and about the memoir he wrote about his experiences there, Badluck Way. He also reads two passages from the book.

About the Book:

During this program Julie Cajune — an American Indian storyteller, educator, and actress — talks about writing the stories in her one-woman play titled “Belief.” She also describes the process of collaborating with writer and poet Jennifer Finley and stage director Linda Grinde

"Belief" is a multidimensional performance, a unique mixture of interconnected Salish women’s stories, poetry, and live music.

The music in this program was written and performed by John Floridis.

Margie Dougherty-Goodburn and several kids who participated in recent workshops through the Missoula Writing Collaborative will be in Studio A this afternoon during Pea Green Boat (4 - 5 p.m.). They'll take turns reading their stories and poems and talk about the process of writing.

During this program Chérie Newman talks with Billings, Montana, author Blythe Woolston about her new novel for young adult readers, Black Helicopters. First question:  "Why was terrorism an idea you wanted to explore with your writing?"

From the publisher:

During this program, Josh Slotnick talks about the art of farming, pigs, and his new poetry collection, FarmHome. He also reads a few poems.

About the book:

David James Duncan called Slotnick "a Wendell-Berry-style 'mad farmer'" and said, "The bracing bittersweetness lacing this free-verse report from the frontlines of a post-corporate agricultural renaissance is all the sweetness we need. HomeFarm is one of the most responsible books of poetry I've ever read."

Historian, teacher, and poet Joseph McGeshick talks about Montana’s Native American poets and about what’s happening on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. He also read a few of his poems.

02/24/2014 - During this Monday Music Special, David Sam plays compositions and covers by Peter LaFarge, Joy Harjo, Blackfire, HAPA— from Hawaii — Jesse Ed Davis, and many more American Indian and Alaska Native musicians. He also plays tracks from a Salish Culture Committee CD that includes historical information about the indigenous people of western Montana and a poem by Jennifer Finley.

 

During this program, Scott Elliott talks with TWQ producer Chérie Newman about his novel Temple Grove, which includes environmental, mythological, and American Indian themes. He also reads a passage from the book.

About the novel:

Celebrate Piano Series

Sunday, February 9, 3:00 p.m.

UM Opera Theater & UM Symphony present The Legend of Orpheus. This romantic valentine of immortal love is a Baroque pastiche: some of the most beautiful vocal music of Monteverdi, Purcell, Gluck and Handel has been arranged and given an English text, to tell the love story of Orpheus and Eurydice.

Produced by Missoula Community Theater. Performances at MCT:

  • Feb 14, 7:30 p.m.
  • Feb 15 at 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.
  • Feb 16 at 2 p.m.

Tickets at MCT box office: 728-PLAY

Marjane Ambler talks about and reads from 'Yellowstone Has Teeth: A memoir of living year-round in the world's first national park.'

About the book:

When Marjane Ambler and her husband, Terry Wehrman, lived in Yellowstone from 1984 until 1993, storytelling was still the favorite community pastime. A journalist by training, Marjane could not resist chronicling those stories of life on a modern frontier.

During this program, YA author Charlie Price talks about and reads from his fifth novel Dead Girl Moon. He also shares information about his teaching career, which included working with troubled teens.

About The Book:

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, Still Here: Not Living in Tipis.

In this first collaborative photo-poetry book between a white urban photographer and a reservation Indian, Sue Reynolds' images and Salish poet Victor Charlo's poems tell a story of resurrection in the face of long odds. The book includes forty-five color photos and five Salish poems. A percentage of sales goes to American Indian College Fund.

During this program, Christine Byl talks about her memoir, Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods, which describes her experiences working on trail crews in national parks in Montana and Alaska.

Andrew R. Graybill talks about and reads from The Red and The White: A Family Saga of the American West, in which he writes about Malcolm Clarke and the Blackfoot Nation of Montana.

About the book:

"Indian Brother"

Jan 6, 2014

April 1945

He came to us wrapped in Mother's blue sweater,
his crippled sister, Mary Jane,
murdered by a drunk.
Three days old, Clarence was his name.
"A sissy name," said Mama. "His name is Joey."

She made him a red bunting with white fur.
His hair, shiny black, stood straight
as beaver points on a Hudson Bay blanket.

His serious, brown self seemed lost
in the fancy wicker cradle that could never
be a cradleboard.

Jamie Ford (Great Falls, Montana) talks about and reads from his second novel, Songs of Willow Frost. He also talks about west coast Chinese culture in the early 20th century.

About the book:

Pages