Chérie Newman

Producer and On-Air Host

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and on-air host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at and

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways to Connect

Out of more the 160 submissions, Eric Heidle of Great Falls, Montana, took first place with his story titled “At Jackson Creek.”

Cherie Newman

Maybe you’ve always dreamed of being a performer, even though you sing like a mud frog and your feet can’t find a two-step. But singing and dancing isn’t the only way to get into the spotlight. What if you could throw flames from your mouth like a dragon?

Rebecca Rice

In America’s booming high tech economy, women are vastly underrepresented. Only four in 1,000 female college freshmen want to major in computer science, and 50% of women who are in science, technology, engineering, and  math careers leave the workforce.

An organization called Technovation is working to change those statistics. Google, Twitter, MIT, and others are backing Technovation’s technology entrepreneurship program and an annual competition for girls ages 10 through 18.

Call Me Home has an epic scope in the tradition of Louise Erdrich’s The Plague of Doves or Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping and braids the stories of a family in three distinct voices: Amy, who leaves her Texas home at nineteen to start a new life with a man she barely knows, and her two children, Jackson and Lydia, who are rocked by their parents’ abusive relationship. When Amy is forced to bargain for the safety of one child over the other, she must retrace the steps in the life she has chosen.

Known worldwide as the “Richest Hill on Earth,” Butte, Montana, lured immigrants from every part of the world to sweat in the copper mines that powered America in its Gilded Age. Dozens of writers celebrated this “wide-open town” with impassioned novels of the rugged souls who braved the western frontier at the edge of the Continental Divide.

Chérie Newman

The Flying Whales, a group of Kindergarten students at Sussex Elementary in Missoula, are getting ready for the WildWalk Parade, one of the upcoming Wildlife Film Festival activities. In a classroom filled with maps, children’s artwork, stuffed animals, and live birds, the kids try their costumes on and talk about the WildWalk Parade.

The Man Who Quit Money is an account of how one man learned to live, sanely and happily, without earning, receiving, or spending a single cent. Daniel Suelo doesn't pay taxes, or accept food stamps or welfare. He lives in caves in the Utah Canyonlands, forages wild foods and gourmet discards. He no longer even carries an I.D. Yet he manages to amply fulfill not only the basic human needs-for shelter, food, and warmth-but, to an enviable degree, the universal desires for companionship, purpose, and spiritual engagement.


"English/Lang Arts 1: Story As Primer"
by Sabrina Holland (Helena)                                                                  







Kathleen Franklin

"Hoka hey"
by Michael Riley (Cody, WY)

Dave Smith

"At Jackson Creek"
by Eric Heidle (Great Falls)