Chérie Newman

Host and Producer

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at PRX.org and MTPR.org.

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways To Connect

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific The Write Question programs students have listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

Do you love reading and recommending books to your friends? Are you a self-motivated, responsible person?

Can you volunteer an hour a week to help promote The Write Question?

Incentives:

  • free books
  • MTPR tote bag and T-shirt
  • opportunities to sit in on author interview recording sessions
  • insider information about the publishing industry and radio production

If you'd like to be a Social Media Volunteer for TWQ, please send few sentences explaining why to Chérie Newman:

cherie dot newman at umontana dot edu

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific The Write Question programs students have listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

On Sunday, December 7 at 7:30 p.m. in the Cathedral of St. Helena, the Helena Symphony officially begins the Helena holiday season with one performance only of Handel’s Messiah, Allan R. Scott – Conductor.

Ken Egan Jr. talks about the reasons behind Montana's designation as a U.S. territory, which included very bad behavior by many of the men who were desperate to grab a bit of the region's resources for themselves. He also tells stories about some of the key characters of the time and reads from his new book, MONTANA 1864: Indians, Emigrants, and God in the Territorial Year.

About the book:

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific The Write Question programs students have listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

HIGH PLAINS CHRISTMAS

Philip Aaberg performs with the Great Falls Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Choir on Sunday, December 7, 2014, at 3 p.m. in the Mansfield Theater.

> More information and tickets

MONTANA 1864

Dec 1, 2014

One hundred and fifty years ago, the land that would become the state of Montana was mostly wild and untrammeled, as it had been for millennia. But then, everything changed. And Ken Egan Jr. wanted to know why. He looked for a book to explain the events of 1864. But didn’t find one. So he wrote his own, which turned out to be a humbling process for this Montana-born scholar.

"People who live in duplexes have a lot in common."    ~ Barbara Noel

Ninety-four-year-old Barbara Noel lives at Grizzly Peak Retirement Community in Missoula. She just published her fourth book, Puns Remembered. Her first three books are Puns Intended, volumes 1, 2, and 3.

With help from a friend and a granddaughter, all four books were published in her 90s.

David G. Gordon explains why we should be eating bugs and talks about some of the recipes in his book, The Eat-A-Bug Cookbook: 40 Ways to Cook Crickets, Grasshoppers, Ants, Water Bugs, Spiders, Centipedes, and Their Kin.

About the Book:

Pages