Chérie Newman

Producer and On-Air Host

Chérie Newman is an arts and humanities producer and on-air host for Montana Public Radio, and a freelance writer. Her weekly literary program, The Write Question, is broadcast on several public radio stations, and available online at PRX.org and MTPR.org.

Her articles, essays, and book reviews have been published in Montana Magazine, High Country News, the University of Montana Alumni Newsletter, Whitefish Review, the Billings Gazette, the Missoulian, Montana Senior News, Outside Bozeman Magazine, and on numerous websites.

Ways To Connect

During this program Julie Cajune — an American Indian storyteller, educator, and actress — talks about writing the stories in her one-woman play titled “Belief.” She also describes the process of collaborating with writer and poet Jennifer Finley and stage director Linda Grinde

"Belief" is a multidimensional performance, a unique mixture of interconnected Salish women’s stories, poetry, and live music.

The music in this program was written and performed by John Floridis.

Margie Dougherty-Goodburn and several kids who participated in recent workshops through the Missoula Writing Collaborative will be in Studio A this afternoon during Pea Green Boat (4 - 5 p.m.). They'll take turns reading their stories and poems and talk about the process of writing.

During this program Chérie Newman talks with Billings, Montana, author Blythe Woolston about her new novel for young adult readers, Black Helicopters. First question:  "Why was terrorism an idea you wanted to explore with your writing?"

From the publisher:

During this program, Josh Slotnick talks about the art of farming, pigs, and his new poetry collection, FarmHome. He also reads a few poems.

About the book:

David James Duncan called Slotnick "a Wendell-Berry-style 'mad farmer'" and said, "The bracing bittersweetness lacing this free-verse report from the frontlines of a post-corporate agricultural renaissance is all the sweetness we need. HomeFarm is one of the most responsible books of poetry I've ever read."

Historian, teacher, and poet Joseph McGeshick talks about Montana’s Native American poets and about what’s happening on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. He also read a few of his poems.

02/24/2014 - During this Monday Music Special, David Sam plays compositions and covers by Peter LaFarge, Joy Harjo, Blackfire, HAPA— from Hawaii — Jesse Ed Davis, and many more American Indian and Alaska Native musicians. He also plays tracks from a Salish Culture Committee CD that includes historical information about the indigenous people of western Montana and a poem by Jennifer Finley.

 

During this program, Scott Elliott talks with TWQ producer Chérie Newman about his novel Temple Grove, which includes environmental, mythological, and American Indian themes. He also reads a passage from the book.

About the novel:

Celebrate Piano Series

Sunday, February 9, 3:00 p.m.

UM Opera Theater & UM Symphony present The Legend of Orpheus. This romantic valentine of immortal love is a Baroque pastiche: some of the most beautiful vocal music of Monteverdi, Purcell, Gluck and Handel has been arranged and given an English text, to tell the love story of Orpheus and Eurydice.

Produced by Missoula Community Theater. Performances at MCT:

  • Feb 14, 7:30 p.m.
  • Feb 15 at 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m.
  • Feb 16 at 2 p.m.

Tickets at MCT box office: 728-PLAY

Marjane Ambler talks about and reads from 'Yellowstone Has Teeth: A memoir of living year-round in the world's first national park.'

About the book:

When Marjane Ambler and her husband, Terry Wehrman, lived in Yellowstone from 1984 until 1993, storytelling was still the favorite community pastime. A journalist by training, Marjane could not resist chronicling those stories of life on a modern frontier.

During this program, YA author Charlie Price talks about and reads from his fifth novel Dead Girl Moon. He also shares information about his teaching career, which included working with troubled teens.

About The Book:

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, Still Here: Not Living in Tipis.

In this first collaborative photo-poetry book between a white urban photographer and a reservation Indian, Sue Reynolds' images and Salish poet Victor Charlo's poems tell a story of resurrection in the face of long odds. The book includes forty-five color photos and five Salish poems. A percentage of sales goes to American Indian College Fund.

During this program, Christine Byl talks about her memoir, Dirt Work: An Education in the Woods, which describes her experiences working on trail crews in national parks in Montana and Alaska.

Andrew R. Graybill talks about and reads from The Red and The White: A Family Saga of the American West, in which he writes about Malcolm Clarke and the Blackfoot Nation of Montana.

About the book:

"Indian Brother"

Jan 6, 2014

April 1945

He came to us wrapped in Mother's blue sweater,
his crippled sister, Mary Jane,
murdered by a drunk.
Three days old, Clarence was his name.
"A sissy name," said Mama. "His name is Joey."

She made him a red bunting with white fur.
His hair, shiny black, stood straight
as beaver points on a Hudson Bay blanket.

His serious, brown self seemed lost
in the fancy wicker cradle that could never
be a cradleboard.

Jamie Ford (Great Falls, Montana) talks about and reads from his second novel, Songs of Willow Frost. He also talks about west coast Chinese culture in the early 20th century.

About the book:

During this program, Wyoming author Alyson Hagy talks about and reads from her novel Boleto. She also tells the story behind the story, which involves a young man she met seven years before writing the book.

About the Book:

Brandon Schrand talks about the influence reading literature had on his early life, when he was a boy growing up in Soda Springs, Idaho, and during the seven years he spent muddling his way through college (the first person in his family to go to college). He also reads several passages from his second memoir, Works Cited:  An Alphabetical Odyssey of Mayhem and Misbehavior.

About the Book:

During this program TWQ producer Chérie Newman talks with Barbara Theroux, manager of Fact & Fiction Bookstore, and Zed about recently-published books written by authors from the western U.S. -- fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, for adults and children.

Michael Marsolek talks with Fern Glass Boyd, Artistic Director and one of the founding members of  the String Orchestra of the Rockies, about SOR's upcoming concert, which will feature solstice and holiday music from around the world.

Visit the String Orchestra of the Rockies Web site to find out about tickets and concert information.

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific programs, which, if students have done their homework assignments, they've listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

Michael Marsolek talks with Tom Benson and Matt Anglen,  Executive Director and Program Director for  Missoula Cultural Council, about the upcoming First Night celebrations in Missoula.

A $15 button is your admission to all events -- except First Night Star, which requires an additional $2 ticket ($3 on the 31st).

During this program Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Ford talks about and reads from his latest novel, Canada. He also considers character motivation, aging, the usefulness of fiction, and the many border crossings in the novel.

About the book:

First, I'll tell about the robbery our parents committed. Then the murders, which happened later.

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific programs, which, if students have done their homework assignments, they've listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

Kate Lebo has created a delightful commonplace book that includes poetry, recipes, illustrations, and a twisty new form of folk wisdom. The conversation during this program includes the definition of a commonplace book, as well as perfect pie crust tips, pie quotes ("We ought to make the pie higher." - George W. Bush), and aphorisms.

About the book:

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific programs, which, if students have done their homework assignments, they've listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

Angels In America, Part One performed by the University of Montana Theater & Dance
Terry Cyr

In this Front Row Center segment, which airs on December 1, Michael Marsolek talks with University of Montana Associate Professor for the School of Theater & Dance John DeBoer about UM's production of 'Angels In America.'

December 1 at 3 p.m.: a special performance for World Aids Day that includes a Talk Back session.

December 3 - 7 at 7:30 p.m.

Henry Real Bird talks about Crow Indian culture and reads poems from his new collection, Wolf Teeth. He also sings a poem.

About Henry Real Bird's poetry:

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific programs, which, if students have done their homework assignments, they've listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

For the last several years, Robert Stubblefield has invited me to talk about The Write Question with students in one of the classes he teaches at the University of Montana. We talk about specific programs, which, if students have done their homework assignments, they've listened to. Then I answer questions about the process of reading, interviewing, and creating programs for radio and the Web.

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