MTPR

Corin Cates-Carney

Capitol Reporter

Corin Cates-Carney is the Capitol Bureau reporter for MTPR,  Corin was formerly MTPR's Flathead area reporter.

Corin has worked for NPR, and is a UM Journalism School Graduate.

Contact Corin Cates-Carney:
Email: corin.cates-carney@mtpr.org
Mobile: 253-495-5193
Capitol Office:  406-444-9399

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Patrick Barkey, director of the BBER, presented the 2018 Montana Economic report in Helena, Tuesday, January 23, 2018.
Corin Cates-Carney

University of Montana researchers expect the state’s economy to kick up this year, following a lackluster performance in 2016 and 2017.

Although earnings in Montana grew over the last two years, those earnings fell short of projections made by researchers at UM’s Bureau of Business and Economic Research.

House for sale.
(PD)

Real estate markets in much of Montana are booming, according to University of Montana researchers. But the strong rise in housing prices since the great recession is creating an issue of affordability.

Wheat.
(PD)

Montana farmers can expect strong prices for their wheat and barley moving forward following the drought in 2017 that reduced grain production in the state by about 40 percent.

Steady and slightly higher prices in wheat, barley and pulse crops markets are expected over the next five years, according to a forecast from Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of Montana.

In order to balance the state budget last year, Governor Steve Bullock and lawmakers signed off on $49 million in cuts to the state health department. The department’s response includes eliminating two-and-half-million worth of contracts to non-profits that serve people with developmental disabilities.

Dan Villa is the state budget director.
Corin Cates-Carney

Governor Steve Bullock’s budget director today said the federal tax bill passed by Congress is expected to result in a $20 million loss in state revenue over the next two years. And that loss is not significant enough to call a special legislative session or require further cuts to government spending.

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