MTPR

Corin Cates-Carney

Capitol Reporter

Corin Cates-Carney is the Capitol Bureau reporter for MTPR,  Corin was formerly MTPR's Flathead area reporter.

Corin has worked for NPR, and is a UM Journalism School Graduate.

Contact Corin Cates-Carney:
Email: corin.cates-carney@mtpr.org
Mobile: 253-495-5193
Capitol Office:  406-444-9399

Ways to Connect

Grizzly bear in Yellowstone National Park.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Endangered Species Act protections for grizzly bears that have been in place for more than three decades are poised to be peeled back soon. This week state and federal land managers from the Rocky Mountain west are meeting talk about what that means for the future of grizzly bear management and recovery.

The Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee, or IGBC is spending three days in Choteau this week working on a five-year-plan to guide management of grizzlies as the bear’s population grows.

Corey Stapleton is Montana’s Secretary of State.
Courtesy of CoreyStapleton.com

Montana Secretary of State Corey Stapleton is reporting voter fraud in Missoula County. But the county’s top election official says it was just a clerical error. Stapleton’s allegation comes a day after state officials certified the results of the May 25 special congressional election.

Gianforte signs paperwork after his sentencing at the Gallatin County Justice Court.
Louise Johns

 

Congressman Greg Gianforte is asking the Gallatin County Court not to require him to have his mug shot and fingerprints taken.

Greg Gianforte
Courtesy Gianforte campaign

Montana’s Secretary of State certified the results of the May 25 special election today, naming Greg Gianforte Montana’s next congressman. Gianforte will be  sworn in as Montana’s next congressman Wednesday,  June 21 in the U.S. Capitol.

Rep. Greg Gianforte at his sentencing hearing in Bozeman Monday
Louise Johns

Greg Gianforte, Montana’s congressman-elect, pleaded guilty and was sentenced today for assaulting a journalist. Gallatin County Judge Rick West declined to give Gianforte any jail time. 

Greg Gianforte in Court
Louise Johns

Congressman-elect Greg Gianforte has pleaded guilty to misdemeanor assault for attacking a reporter on the eve of the state’s special election last month.

Montana Republican Party buttons
Flickr user, llP Photo Archive (CC-by-2.0)

Montana’s Republican party meets Friday and Saturday to select new leadership. It’s trying to expand on big gains it made in 2016 and this year, and rebound from recent damage to its public image.

Governor Bullock, with Budget Director Dan Villa. Governor Bullock released his revenue and spending plan Nov. 15 at the Capitol in Helena.
Corin Cates-Carney

State revenues have again fallen short of lawmakers’ expectations and could trigger funding cuts across state agencies in the coming months.

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox was considered a possible contender in the 2018 senate race, after Republican Congressman Ryan Zinke accepted the position of Interior Secretary.
Courtesy Montana DOJ

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox today confirmed reports that he will not run for a U.S. Senate seat in 2018. Despite courtship from national Republican leaders, Fox says he will not campaign for the Senate seat currently held by Democrat Jon Tester.

Republican Greg Gianforte won Montana’s special election May 25, 2017.
Rowebotz (CC-BY-SA-4.0)

Montana’s congressman-elect Greg Gianforte has not yet been sworn in, but has filed for re-election in 2018.

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox was considered a possible contender in the 2018 senate race, after Republican Congressman Ryan Zinke accepted the position of Interior Secretary.
Courtesy Montana DOJ

The news source Politico is reporting that Montana Attorney General Tim Fox has decided not to run for Senate next year. Veteran reporter Chuck Johnson speaks with MTPR's Corin Cates-Carney.

U.S. Congressman-Elect Greg Gianforte
Bree Zender

Greg Gianforte will probably be given more time to appear in court on his misdemeanor assault charge. That’s according Gallatin County Attorney Marty Lambert.

"I don’t think it’s going to happen Monday or Wednesday of next week," Lambert says.

A second ride-sharing company is hoping to set up shop in Montana. Officials with Lyft Inc. will testify before state regulators Monday, trying to prove they’re ready to join Uber in a Montana’s mobile app ride-hailing industry.
SDOT photos (CC-BY-NC-2)

A second ride-sharing company is hoping to set up shop in Montana. Officials with Lyft Inc. will testify before state regulators Monday, trying to prove they’re ready to join Uber in a Montana’s mobile app ride-hailing industry.

An escalating trade war brewing between the United States and Canada could save timber mills in Montana, but at the cost of over 1,000 jobs north of the border in British Columbia.
(PD)

Lumber industry workers in Montana gathered in the capitol this afternoon to update the governor on the health of their businesses amidst a trade dispute between the U.S. and Canada.

Greg Gianforte and his wife, Susan, celebrate victory in the U.S. House race May 25, 2017 in Bozeman, MT.
Corin Cates-Carney

U.S. congressman-elect Greg Gianforte could appear in court as early as Wednesday to face the misdemeanor assault charge police gave him last Wednesday. Gianforte missed his first opportunity to appear in court last Friday.

Greg Gianforte and his wife, Susan, celebrate victory in the U.S. House race May 25, 2017 in Bozeman, MT.
Corin Cates-Carney

Greg Gianforte won the special election for Montana’s lone seat in the U.S. House in an early test of support for the Trump Administration. His win came one day after Gianforte was charged for assaulting a reporter.

In his victory speech at a Bozeman hotel, the Republican second-time candidate Gianforte told a crowd of supporters that Montana just sent a wakeup call to the political establishment in Washington D.C.

Gallatin County Sheriff Brian Gootkin speaks during a press conference on the Gianforte assault in Bozeman, May 25, 2017.
Corin Cates-Carney

Greg Gianforte is not responding to the Gallatin County Sheriff’s request for an interview in the investigation that led to him being charged with misdemeanor assault.

According to a Ben Jacobs, a reporter for the Guardian, Gianforte "body slammed" him as Jacobs attempted to interview him Wednesday night.

So-called “robo-calls” are prohibited by state law, but whether these calls are strictly illegal is hard to sort out.
(PD)

Some Montanans are getting phone calls with pre-recorded messages from President Donald Trump and others urging them to vote for Republican U.S. House Candidate Greg Gianforte. So-called “robo-calls” are prohibited by state law, but whether these calls are strictly illegal is hard to sort out.

The Republican National Committee is paying for robo-calls by President Donald Trump, according to a report from CNN.

Greg Gianforte.
Josh Burnham

This week Republican U.S. House candidate Greg Gianforte has been telling his supporters that the race is, “closer than it should be.” MTPR's Corin Cates-Carney dropped in on a Gianforte get-out-the-vote event at Montana GOP headquarters in Helena today.

U.S. House candidate Greg Gianforte at a "meet and greet" with supporters in Great Falls, MT, May 23, 2017.
Corin Cates-Carney

The candidates in Thursday's election for the state’s lone seat in the U.S. House are anticipating a close finish, and it’s fueling a final push for voter turnout in the final days on the campaign trail.

The GOP’s Greg Gianforte held the first of three "meet and greet" events Tuesday morning in Great Falls. He stood among a couple dozen supporters under a pavilion at a city park, where local Republican leaders supplied coffee and donuts for the chance to mingle with the candidate.

Gerry and Chuck Jennings, volunteers for Democrat Rob Quist's campaign, go over their door knocking assignments Monday in Great Falls
Corin Cates-Carney

With just three days remaining in the race to become Montana’s next congressman, both major parties are working their ground games. And the candidates are hitting the state’s population centers in final efforts to get their bases to the polls.

A 2005 state law requires Montana utilities to buy a total of 75 megawatts of energy from small-scale, locally owned producers of renewable electricity from wind, solar, and hydro sources.
(PD)

Montana’s largest utility provider announced Wednesday it is looking for small-scale renewable energy projects that it’s required by law to buy. But utilities and their regulators in Montana say that requirement is outdated, and that the law should be repealed.

Greg Gianforte (L) and Rob Quist (R) are running for Congress in a special election to fill Ryan Zinke's seat.
MTPR News

Candidates and outside groups are dumping more than $12 million into Montana’s short special election race for the U.S. House, surpassing the spending in last year’s race by $3 million. That’s according to the latest federal campaign reports filed this week.

Mark Wicks was the Libertarian candidate for Montana's U.S. House seat in the 2017 special election.
Courtesy Mark Wicks

While about $12 million is financing the U.S. House race between Republican Greg Gianforte and Democrat Rob Quist, the Libertarian candidate says contributions to his campaign are just starting to roll in. The main party candidates have each brought in over $3 million to fund their campaigns.

Outside groups have dumped millions more, picking sides between the Republican and Democrat, according to federal election reports. Those reports also show that Libertarian candidate Mark Wicks has raised $2,030, coming entirely from individual donations.

Republican Greg Gianforte won Montana’s special election May 25, 2017.
Rowebotz (CC-BY-SA-4.0)

Republican U.S. House candidate Greg Gianforte picked up the endorsements of three of Montana’s largest newspapers over the weekend. 

The Missoulian, the Helena Independent Record, and the Billings Gazette all endorsed Gianforte over Democrat Rob Quist in the race to fill the state’s open seat in congress.

U.S. House Candidates Greg Gianforte (L) and Rob Quist (R).
Corin Cates-Carney/Josh Burnham

About $12 million is fueling the special election between Democrat Rob Quist and Republican Greg Gianforte, according to latest campaign finance disclosures.

The money pouring into Montana’s sprint race to fill the state’s lone seat in the U.S. House now exceeds the total from the previous House race held in 2016. In that race just over $9 million was spent, according to reports from the Federal Election Commission.

Donald Trump Jr. returned to Montana on May 11 to rally supporters for U.S. House candidate Greg Gianforte in Butte, Montana.
Corin Cates-Carney

Donald Trump Jr., the head of the NRA, and Republican candidate Greg Gianforte rallied supporters in Butte, Thursday morning, two weeks before voting ends in the special election to decide Montana’s next lone representative in the U.S. House.

When the race started, Democrats saw the May 25 special election as an opportunity for a referendum against President Donald Trump. But Trump Jr. promised the crowd of about 170 supporters gathered outside a mining equipment and supply store just south of Butte’s uptown, that this would be a referendum of a different kind.

The Cut Bank voting center.
Corin Cates-Carney

Before Rob Quist became a politician, or toured the country in a bluegrass band, he lived in Cut Bank, a rural Hi-line town near where the Rocky Mountains meet the eastern plains.

The young Quist lived on a ranch just north of the town with his family. Back then, Cut Bank was one of Montana’s big-time oil producers, Quist was his high school’s student body president, and he helped the Cut Bank Wolves win a state basketball championship, leading the team in scoring in the title game.

Gov. Steve Bullock. File photo.
Corin Cates-Carney

Governor Steve Bullock used his veto pen Thursday to kill what he calls "a regular political game" played by the Legislature, to restrict the governor’s use of the state airplane.

The bill sponsored by Missoula Republican Brad Tschida would have blocked the governor from using the state plane for any activity related to state or federal political campaigns, unless the governor reimburses the state for the costs.

A Christian flag at the National Day of Prayer event in Great Falls Thursday
Corin Cates-Carney

Twenty-one days before Montana selects its next U.S. Congressman, the Republican candidate stood among a crowd of more than 100 Christians in a small park in Great Falls, joining a national plea to God.

This gathering outside the civic center downtown is a local observance of the National Day of Prayer. It’s been an annual event since the 1950s, when Congress made a law that the president would set aside a day each year for prayer.

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