MTPR

Corin Cates-Carney

Capitol Reporter

Corin Cates-Carney is the Capitol Bureau reporter for MTPR,  Corin was formerly MTPR's Flathead area reporter.

Corin has worked for NPR, and is a UM Journalism School Graduate.

Contact Corin Cates-Carney:
Email: corin.cates-carney@mtpr.org
Mobile: 253-495-5193
Capitol Office:  406-444-9399

Ways to Connect

Chair of the Legislative Finance Committee Rep. Nancy Ballance.
Mike Albans

We’ve been reporting a lot on the budget cuts Governor Steve Bullock’s administration has been making as a result of a more than $200 million state budget shortfall. The cuts are the result of bills passed in the regular and special legislative sessions in 2017.

Since then political leaders on both sides of the aisle have been distancing themselves from some of the impacts of those decisions.

Railroad crossing.
(PD)

In a year when news of railroad crashes and train derailments from around the country have jumped into headlines, new data show railroad accidents in Montana are declining at a faster pace than most of the Northwest region.

Hearing room at the Montana Capitol.
William Marcus

State lawmakers are considering dissolving the state workers compensation system, or turning it into a private entity.

A public workers compensation insurance fund is written into Montana’s constitution.

Liquor bottles.
(PD)

State lawmakers say a bill written in the fast-paced special legislative session in November to help patch the state budget shortfall has errors and needs fixing.

During the haste of the special legislative session, a bill that allows the state to sell 54 more liquor licenses didn’t turn out exactly how some people thought it would.

Rep. Nate McConnell.
Montana Legislature

Montana lawmakers are joining the state's congressional delegation in asking the federal government for more information about alleged misconduct by federal food safety inspectors at meat processing businesses.

State lawmakers are concerned that small meat processing businesses are being treated differently than large businesses, among other allegations of misconduct by federal inspectors.

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