Dan Boyce

Reporter

Dan Boyce moved to the Inside Energy team at Rocky Mountain PBS in 2014, after five years of television and radio reporting in his home state of Montana. In his most recent role as Montana Public Radio’s Capitol Bureau Chief, Dan produced daily stories on state politics and government.

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Transcript

Dan Boyce

Montana is steeped in agriculture—it’s prominent in the state’s history; it’s still our number one industry.

It’s a changing world for farmers, though, and young people looking to get into the field are facing very different challenges.

But, the modern age is also bringing unique agricultural opportunity.

Bas Lammers/flickr

Montana Wildlife officials are hearing complaints about a new mountain lion study showing populations much higher than previously expected in the Bitterroot.

Opponents of the study accuse the state of using a faulty method to come to the higher population. They say the lion numbers are much lower, and hunting quotas should be lowered. The most vocal supporters of bringing down these quotas are the lion hunters themselves.

  Senator Jon Tester says he is happy with how the U.S. Defense Department is complying with a nuclear reduction treaty signed with Russia in 2011.

A plan to remove 50 missiles from America’s land-based nuclear arsenal should not significantly affect operations at Montana’s Malmstrom Air Force Base.

Tester says reducing those missiles won’t reduce personnel.

"I think the win is here that the missile silos, even though they don't have a missile in them will be kept operational," he says.

mt.gov

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its latest report at the end of March.

The panel, established by the United Nations, continues to point to the vast majority of scientific research indicating human activity is a primary driver of our warming global climate.

In Montana, research suggests a future with lower mountain snowpack, hotter drier summers, and more severe wildfires.

  Elected officials in the Helena area are trying to remind people about their options for reducing their state property taxes.

Those opportunities exist for veterans, elderly and people of low income. 

Leaders are looking to educate at the Helena Food Share. 

  Click here for information on the Property Tax Assistance Program

Dan Boyce

Governor Steve Bullock has released a major economic development initiative which will guide his administration’s approach to growing jobs and raising wages.

The governor’s office has been working on the Main Street Montana Project for almost a year—holding roundtable discussions around the state led by some top business leaders.

The Governor describes the plan as a bottom-up method for growing the state economy.

The U.S. Supreme Court has decided to let individuals give to as many political candidates and campaigns as they want.

The 5-4 vote Wednesday, led by the court’s conservative majority, frees up wealthy contributors to give more campaign donations ahead of the 2014 election.

It will have an immediate impact on Montana races for federal office, such as the US Senate and House of Representatives.

But, the state Commissioner of Political Practices says statewide elections will not be affected that much.

A civil rights organization filed a lawsuit Monday against the state over the treatment of mentally ill inmates at the Montana State Prison and at the Montana State Hospital.

Disability Rights Montana sued seven top officials with both the state Departments of Corrections and Health and Human Services, saying mentally ill inmates are “subjected to a cruel system that exacerbates, rather than treats and ameliorates their mental illness.”

lowjumpingfrog/flickr

National Park Service officials are announcing a partnership with the state of Montana to consider changes to managing bison in and around Yellowstone National Park.

Hundreds of bison wander into the state from the park’s northern boundary during many winters.

Livestock owners worry about the animals damaging property and spreading disease.

The Park Service and the state have been operating under their current Bison Management Plan since 2001.

The agencies think it may be time for an update.

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