Edward O'Brien


Edward O'Brien is Montana Public Radio's Associate News Director.

Ways to Connect

Voting the old-fashioned way.
Josh Burnham

Lewis and Clark County Commissioner Susan Good Geise says voters on Tuesday not only said "no" to plans for a new detention center, they said “heck no”.

Missoula County Public Schools Superintendent Mark Thane says he’s “extremely grateful” for Tuesday’s 11th-hour victory of a $70 million high school bond issue. Local voters passed it as well as an $88 million dollar elementary bond. The levies will pay for local school maintenance, renovations, remodeling and technology and security updates.

File photo. Montana's construction industry needs skilled labor and is going out of its way to get it.

There's a labor shortage in Montana, just ask Bill Fritz.

"If you aren’t working right now, it’s your own fault. Everybody who says they don’t have a job – if you go out and get some training you can pretty much write your own ticket.”

There are 566 federally recognized Indian tribes in the United States. Gerald Gray hopes Montana's Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians gets to be the 567th.

”Because we’re always under the assumption and have been told that Congress can recognize tribes.”

A group of Montana parents says lawsuits against the Environmental Protection Agency’s so-called “Clean Power Plan” are shortsighted and dangerous.

A group of Montana parents says lawsuits against the Environmental Protection Agency’s so-called “Clean Power Plan” are shortsighted and dangerous.

Montana Attorney General Tim Fox has joined 23 other states suing to stop the plan, which calls for Montana to reduce its carbon dioxide emissions by 47 percent by 2030.

Thomas Perez, U.S. Secretary of Labor
U.S. Department of Labor (PD)

U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez cautions Montana educators against thinking too narrowly about their jobs.

"It's a false choice to suggest we're either training people for the jobs of tomorrow or we're training people to be critical thinkers. Our workforce needs both critical skills and critical thinking."

Photograph showing the seepage outflow from the drain pipe at the     American Tunnel at Gladstone, Colorado, as it appeared on September 3, 2015, with  about 100 gpm of acid water flowing out.
U.S. Department of Interior

An Interior Department probe blames sloppy work by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for a 3 million gallon wastewater spill from a Colorado gold mine.

Roughly a third of Montana's estimated 3,000 known abandoned mines could potentially pollute surface water.

Former Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer
File photo (PD)

Former Governor Brian Schweitzer says Montana is well-positioned to help lead what he believes is the country's inevitable energy revolution.

"We're one of the 31 states that passed a [mandatory] renewable energy portfolio. Electricity that we're using in Montana, more than 15 percent of our portfolio is already from renewables."

Former Montana Governor Brian Schweitzer is bullish on the future of energy generation and distribution.

Schweitzer's written a new book titled "Power Up.energy" in which he asserts an energy revolution is underway in the United States. He says our dependence on foreign fossil fuels can and should be replaced within 20 years by natural gas, solar and advanced battery technologies.

Montana's seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate dropped slightly in September to 4.1 percent, compared to the revised August estimate of 4.2 percent.