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Courtesy Photo Border Crossing Law Firm

A Helena immigration attorney says the phones at his Border Crossing law firm were ringing off the hook today. Shahid Haque-Hausrath says his clients are thrilled with President Obama's executive action on immigration.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

A Montana man who discovered the underlying cause of Lyme disease died Monday in Hamilton.

Dr. Wilhelm "Willy" Burgdorfer was born in Switzerland where he earned his undergraduate and PhD degrees in Zoology, Parasitology and Bacteriology.

Burgdorfer moved to Montana's Bitterroot Valley in 1951 to work as a research fellow at Hamilton's Rocky Mountain Laboratory. He became a U.S. citizen in 1957 and then joined the staff at R.M.L as a medical entomologist.

Governor Steve Bullock's longtime Chief of Staff is leaving and is being replaced by Tracy Stone-Manning, the current Director of the Montana Department of Environmental Quality.

Bullock's outgoing chief of staff, Tim Burton, is leaving to lead the Montana League of Cities and Towns; a nonprofit association of 129 Montana municipalities. Burton says Stone-Manning is an excellent choice.

Gov. Proposes $300 Million For Montana's Aging Infrastructure

Nov 18, 2014
n-vision photos-cc-by

Much of Montana's roads, bridges and waterways are reaching the end of their useful life. In a new state-specific report card released today, Montana Civil Engineers give that aging infrastructure a mediocre overall grade of C-minus and say it needs attention.

Courtesy The Annie E. Casey Foundation

Nearly half of all Montana kids are growing up in low income homes.

That’s according to the latest Montana KIDS COUNT policy report, put out by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The report concludes it's going to take a coordinated approach to help lift kids out of those circumstances.

A new report says at least four Montana cities can do more to protect their lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender citizens and employees.
 
According to the Municipality Equality Index, produced by the Human Rights Campaign, the average score for cities in Montana is 44 out of 100 points. That's below the national average of 59.

Billings scored 23 points, Bozeman 40 and Helena 53. Great Falls scored 2 points and Missoula 100.  

Edward O'Brien

For Missoulian Bob Ferris, every day is Veterans Day.

Ferris was stationed with the 1st Battalion, 9th Marines during the Vietnam war. That particular battalion sustained heavy casualties; 749 men were killed in action and two went missing in action during it's Vietnam service. Ferris attended today's annual Forgotten Warriors Post 101 Veterans Day ceremony.

"You wouldn't let a little snow and ice and anything else keep you from being down here," Ferris said. "It's very important."

A “crowd-shooting” incident on the east side of Canyon Ferry Reservoir last weekend has opened a discussion about hunter ethics; specifically, when is it OK to shoot a game animal?

Justin Feddes says the shooting in the White's Gulch area outside Helena started at first light last Sunday morning.

"If I had to guess, I'd say probably around 30 elk were killed. Probably 18 - 20 bulls, the rest were probably cows. We had two wounded," said Feddes.

Flickr User Ian Sane CC-BY-2.0

Shooting into a large elk herd may not be illegal, but is it ethical?

Experts say, "not really."

But that's just what happened last weekend in the White's Gulch area on the east side of Canyon Ferry Reservoir outside Helena.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks Game Warden Justin Feddes says hunters spotted a herd of about 500 elk at first light on Sunday. Feddes reports they started shooting, which scattered the rest of the herd onto a mix of private and public lands.

The Breakthrough Institute

Whether you're raising cattle outside of Bozeman, growing coffee in India, or maintaining your lawn in Hamilton, you're producing and managing wildlife.

Researcher Paul Robbins says that's neither good nor bad - it's just a fact. Robbins is director of the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconson-Madison.

Rep. Ryan Zinke (R) Montana. File photo.
Courtesy photo, Ryan Zinke

Ryan Zinke, Montana's new U.S. Representative spoke with MTPR Assistant News Director Edward O'Brien late Tuesday.

Zinke says he's ready to get to work in Congress representing the people of Montana.

"I understand the responsibility. You not only represent the people who voted for you, but you represent the folks that did not. I think it's time to roll up the sleeves and get things done."

libbymt.com

Voters in Montana’s cities can sometimes face long voting lines. We checked in with election officials in a couple of small towns to see how things are going for them.

"The turnout is brisk," Leigh Riggleman, Lincoln County Assistant Elections Administrator in Libby says. "Our polling stations seem to be very busy. Our front counter for late registration has been steady. (We) always like to see good voter turnout."

Riggleman says Lincoln County has roughly 13,000 registered voters and seven polling stations, but she says voting by mail is getting more popular every year.

Courtesy EPA

It will take more time before we learn about potential cleanup options at a former paper mill in Frenchtown.

Today was the Environmental Protection Agency's original deadline for the site's prior and current owners to present a "good faith" cleanup offer. The plant was in operation since the 1950’s. It was most recently owned by the Smurfit-Stone Container. The plant closed in 2010 and was purchased by M2 Green Redevelopment in 2011.

The Missoula City Council may vote tonight on a proposal that would allow the mayor to continue his effort to force the sale of the local water company to the city.

The Carlyle Group currently owns Mountain Water Company. A Canadian firm, Algonquin Power,  has entered into an agreement to purchase Mountain Water and its California based parent company for $327 million.

The city's attempt to use eminent domain to take ownership of Mountain Water has proven to be costly and raised a few eyebrows.

Grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem are close to losing their endangered species status.

Chris Servheen says that population is healthy, robust and ready for that transition.

Servheen is the Grizzly Bear Recovery Coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

He and other members of an Interagency Grizzly Bear Management subcommittee met yesterday in Bozeman to discuss the status of Yellowstone grizzly bears.

Christian Engelstoft

Bat biologists are in a race against time. A fungal disease called White Nose Syndrome is killing bats by the millions.

Regional biologists are scrambling to collect baseline data on bat habitat, species, and populations before the disease gets a foothold in the northwest. The Canadian government asked conservation groups this summer to help study bats in British Columbia's Flathead River Valley.

Filmmaker Leanne Allison produced a five minute video documenting the resulting “Bat BioBlitz."

A fungal disease is wiping-out bats by the millions and it's spreading west.

Bat biologists gathered this summer in British Columbia's Flathead River Valley to take an inventory of local bat species and habitat.

During the so-called "BioBlitz", they detected two species of bat that are considered endangered and particularly vulnerable to the fatal White Nose fungus.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (CC-BY-ND)

A hunter unloading a gun accidentally shot his 56-year-old companion in the Brown's Gulch area north of Butte last weekend.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks game warden Sergeant Aaron Berg says a lot of people are now in the backcountry carrying high-powered rifles. Meaning everyone, hunting or not, should wear that bright hunter orange; 400 square inches of it to be exact.

Berg adds that those carrying rifles have the responsibility to use them properly.

USDA

Hundreds of Montana farmers are in Great Falls discussing issues that affect not only their bottom line, but our food supply.

The 99-year-old Montana Farmers Union is holding its annual meeting and convention that lasts through tomorrow. Farmers face challenges that go far beyond crop yields and market prices.

Have you received an official-looking mailer that rates the political leanings of Montana's four nonpartisan Supreme Court candidates?

If so, take a close look at it; the flier features an image of Montana's state seal and compares the candidates' political ideologies to those of President Obama and former Republican Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney.

Problem is, it's a fake. The state of Montana has nothing to do with these mailers.

Fewer homes sold in the Missoula area during the first three quarters of this year compared to the same time last year, but a local real estate official says he's not too worried.

In fact, Brint Wahlberg says Missoula's housing market continues its steady recovery.

Republican Congressman Steve Daines didn't respond to Democrat Amanda Curtis's jabs during last night’s U.S. Senate debate in Billings.

Curtis said several times that Daines is too extreme for Montana and represents corporate interests over average Montanans. She says it's time to send a working-class Montanan to represent the state in Washington D.C.

Curtis also said Daines' vote last year to shut down the federal government during a budget stalemate hurt Montanans.

Josh Burnham (CC-BY-2.0)

It turns out 145 genetically pure bison captured from Yellowstone National Park will stay in Montana.

Several out-of-state entities wanted those animals.

Charting the Path of the Deadly Ebola Virus in Central Africa. PLoS Biol 3/11/2005: e403 doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0030403 (CC-BY-2.5)

Governor Steve Bullock says he's confident that should Missoula's Providence Saint Patrick hospital be asked to treat an Ebola patient, it would provide top notch care.

St.Pat's is one of four hospitals in the country specifically prepared to care for someone with such a highly infectious disease.

As we reported yesterday, some people who work there aren’t sure the hospital is adequately prepared to accept an Ebola case.

Bell & Jeff (CC-BY-2.0)

The U.S. Forest Service's Northern Region met its timber harvest goal last year. That’s the first time that has happened in over 14 years.

Regional Forester Faye Krueger says Region One, which includes Montana, harvested about 280 million board feet of timber.

Krueger says a major factor in the agency reaching its goal is that it's  overhauled its litigation strategy.

Edward O'Brien

Governor Steve Bullock's early childhood education proposal received an enthusiastic response today at a Missoula pre-kindergarten program, even as critics are wondering about its expense and value to taxpayers.

Missoula City Website

The news that a nurse has contracted the first-ever case of Ebola transmitted in the United States could make it more likely that any future Ebola patients in the United States might come to Missoula. That nurse in Dallas became infected while caring for a patient from west Africa.

MEA-MFT Facebook page

Montana public school students have a short week so their teachers can attend a two-day conference in Missoula this Thursday and Friday. Up to 3,000 teachers will participate in the annual Montana Education Association-Montana Federation of Teachers conference. The MEA-MFT teachers' union vice president Melanie Charlson says this conference is anything but some sort of a vacation for teachers.

"You want to make certain that all of your professionals are honing their skills," says Charlson.

Thomas Helbig (CC-BY-2.0)

Chess Masters from across Western Montana convene in Kalispell tomorrow for the 15th annual Flathead Chess Championship.

The Blackfeet Community College chess team will be among the competitors looking to take home the grand prize and bragging rights.

The team was formed last year and won an overall national tournament. It also won 1st and 3rd in individual rounds at the same event. 

Chess team coach Dr. Mark Anderson says the club is attracting students despite stiff competition for their attention by gadgets and videogames.

The U.S. Army War College has revoked Senator Walsh's graduate status.

The New York Times reported in July that Walsh had plagiarized over 25 percent of his final paper needed to earn a master’s degree from the United States Army War College in 2007.

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