MTPR

Eric Whitney

News Director

Eric Whitney is the news director for Montana Public Radio.

406-243-4075

Ways to Connect

A slide from a new survey showing how Montanans get Montana news.
Courtesy University of Montana Bureau of Business and Economic Research

A new survey shows that more Montanans are turning to the internet for news than any other source. And it says most Montana online news consumers are getting it via their smartphones.

Healthcare professionals say that modern information sharing could improve healthcare and save money.
(PD)

There's a new effort underway in the state to better connect hospitals, doctors' offices and other health care providers. Like, through the internet. That's not really happening much now, and it's frustrating to doctors like Michael Vlases with Bozeman Health:

At a meeting convened by the Montana Medical Association, a health information technology expert from Oklahoma talked about how his state created a system to easily share patient data.
Eric Whitney

A lot of the major players in health care in Montana got together today to work on sharing patient data digitally. At a meeting convened by the Montana Medical Association, a health information technology expert from Oklahoma talked about how his state created a system to easily share patient data. That isn't happening much in Montana because privacy laws forbid simply emailing health records, among many other reasons.

Oceti Sakowin camp, as seen from "Media Hill," where MTPR's Nicky Ouelette spoke to News Director Eric Whitney earlier today.
Nicky Ouellet

MTPR’s Nicky Ouellet has been in North Dakota this week, covering the Dakota Access Pipeline protest for Inside Energy . Earlier today, Eric Whitney spoke with her about her experience there.

Tobin Miller Shearer teaches history at the University of Montana
Mike Albans

A University of Montana professor who’s been put on a conservative “watchlist ” says he’s wary, but won’t be intimidated. Tobin Miller Shearer teaches history and is director of African American Studies at UM. A couple of weeks ago a colleague emailed him to let him know he’d been put on an online list with dozens of other academics nationwide.

UM President Royce Engstrom speaks about UM's handling of sexual assaults at a July 10 press conference in Missoula, MT.
Eric Whitney - MTPR

The statement below was issued by Montana Commissioner of Higher Education Clayton Christian Thursday, December 1 at 8:50 am. Christian issued an additional statement at 10:00 am, which is below as well. We'll have more on this story later today.

A map of a portion of the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest
Helana-Lewis and Clark National Forest

The Helena - Lewis and Clark National Forest has released its proposed new Forest Plan . The Plan is years in the making, and a four month public comment period on it will open once notice is officially published in the Federal Register, which is expected later this week.

Job Service officies statewide, like this one in Kalispell, are offering special help to new Medicaid recipients
Eric Whitney

Medicaid expansion barely passed Montana's Legislature last year. One of the reasons it was able to get enough Republican votes is because it included a component to encourage Medicaid recipients to get jobs, or better-paying jobs, so they could get off of Medicaid and buy their own health insurance. Tuesday afternoon, a legislative oversight committee is taking a look at how that work component is going.

Bill and Carolyn Franke and their family visit the UM campus to celebrate their gift with the University community.
Courtesy University of Montana

Today the state board of regents approved re-naming a school and an academic program at the University of Montana in honor of a major financial contributor .

People gathered on the north steps of the capitol in Helena Nov. 14 to let Governor Steve Bullock and Attorney General Tim Fox know they don't like Montana police being sent to help with security around the Dakota Access Pipeline protests in North Dakota.
Eric Whitney

About 80 people gathered on the north steps of the Capitol today to let Governor Steve Bullock and Attorney General Tim Fox know they don't like Montana police being sent to help with security around the Dakota Access Pipeline protests in North Dakota.

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