Katrin Frye

Flathead Reporter

Katrin Frye reports twice weekly on northwest Montana news from her native Flathead Valley. Frye is a graduate of the University Of Montana School Of Journalism and Davidson Honors College. Before coming on board with MTPR, she reported for the local CBS affiliate in the Flathead Valley, and worked as a contributing writer to the weekly paper the Flathead Beacon. Her reports covering the news of the Flathead Valley and northwest Montana have been heard on National Public Radio’s Evening Edition, NPR News and National Native News.

Ways To Connect

Mike Roessmann

Summer rushes in on the rising waters of the rivers around northwest Montana. Each year for 39 years in Bigfork it's also announced through the annual Whitewater Festival.

This years festival featured kayaks and rafts braving the Class IV rapids on the "Wild Mile" of the Swan River, as well as Stand Up Paddleboards.

The two-day event features beginner and expert slalom races judged by time and accuracy as paddlers maneuver down the river through specially market gates.

Katrin Frye

Lacrosse is a common sport from elementary school on up through college on the east coast. In Montana it’s relatively new with high school aged boys teams and younger growing over the past decade, and girls teams just a couple of years old.

This past weekend the third ever state championship tournament was held in Whitefish. Flathead Boys Lacrosse Coach Matt Rizzolo is coaching the Valley-wide high school team.

Katrin Frye

Each May for about two decades the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes have held a River Honoring and invited children from across the reservation and beyond. The honoring started in 1986 in response to a push for additional dams below Kerr Dam, along the lower Flathead River.

Education Specialist Germaine White with the Division of Fish, Wildlife, Recreation and Conservation said the Tribal Culture Committee was very concerned about a disturbance to the river.

Robin Mooring

Judy Breland has gone horse packing before, in fact, her husband Andy Breland is teaching the back country horse packing workshop she’s taking. Plus, the family has a store, Trailhead Supply, that sells horse packing equipment.

Katrin Frye

Montana is counted among the fastest growing states for an aging population. In a nod to the state’s aging demographic the 46th annual Governors Conference on Aging looked at issues specifically effecting seniors including transportation, health, and safety. The two-day event took place in Kalispell and Bozeman this week.

It also offers an opportunity to recognize Montana’s centenarians.

Katrin Frye

Finding common ground in the forest is one of the key goals of the Family Forestry Expo in the Flathead, and it has been since the Expo first came together 25-years-ago. May 5-9, fifth graders from across the area head to a section of forest on the outskirts of Columbia Falls learning about fisheries, forest fire, back country camping and safety, logging, and more.

Spotted Bear District Ranger Deb Mucklow with the Flathead National Forest worked on the very first Forestry Expo in 1989. She said there was a lot of polarization on natural resources issues.

Every ten years Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks goes back to the drawing board to look at fees, license costs, and its budget.

Administrator of Communication and Education Ron Aasheim said a Council recently came out with a series of recommendations including raising fees on hunting and fishing licenses. Aasheim said without a fee increase, redirected funding, or budget cuts, the agency is facing a $5.7-million shortfall by the end of 2017.

Katrin Frye

High School art students from around the state converge on one town each year for a 24-hour workshop-blitz. This year Kalispell’s Glacier High and Flathead Valley Community College housed more than 200-students learning jewelry making, painting, printmaking and numerous other techniques. The students from 18 different Montana schools came to the Flathead Friday through Saturday as part of the 2014 Montana Art Interscholastic event.

Workshops range from familiar sounding art classes like oil painting and watercolor workshop, to edible art, and urban art.

Major environmental legislation like the Clean Air and Endangered Species Act followed the first earth day celebration in April of 1970. Whitefish resident Steve Thompson is hoping the growth of local efforts across the country will again have a similar effect, this time in relation to climate change.

Katrin Frye

The potential to lose a popular access to Flathead Lake’s north shore rallies the community of Bigfork and shines a light on the issue of private property and public access to water. The access in question is a county-right-of way, running through government and private land on the north shore of the lake. There’s a US Fish and Wildlife Service Waterfowl Production Area and a state Fish, Wildlife and Parks Fisheries Conservation area, both currently closed to the public. The waterfowl production area stays closed to public access from March into July while birds are nesting.

Pages