Katrin Frye

Flathead Reporter

Katrin Frye reports twice weekly on northwest Montana news from her native Flathead Valley. Frye is a graduate of the University Of Montana School Of Journalism and Davidson Honors College. Before coming on board with MTPR, she reported for the local CBS affiliate in the Flathead Valley, and worked as a contributing writer to the weekly paper the Flathead Beacon. Her reports covering the news of the Flathead Valley and northwest Montana have been heard on National Public Radio’s Evening Edition, NPR News and National Native News.

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Libby Asbestos Healthcare
3:45 pm
Thu August 22, 2013

How health care reform is changing Libby asbestos victims benefits

The CARD Clinic of Libby is a non-profit organization providig asbestos screening and healthcare to people exposed to asbestos.
Credit Katrin Frye

Right now people living with Asbestos related diseases contracted from the W-R Grace mine in Libby and living in Flathead or Lincoln Counties receive additional Medicare benefits. These benefits include compensation for medical-related travel expenses and medicine not traditionally covered through Medicare.

But, if they now live outside of Lincoln or Flathead Counties, those benefits are not available.

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Glacier National Park
3:24 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

New business to take charge of hotels and restaurants in Glacier Park

Hotels in Glacier Park are owned by the Park Service, but operated by private business. Glacier Park Inc. has been operating these for more than 30 years. In January 2014 Xanterra is taking over.
Credit Katrin Frye

A new company is taking over management of Glacier Park’s historic hotels and restaurants. The National Park Service owns the buildings, but for the past 30-plus years Glacier Park Incorporated has been running the businesses. Glacier Park recently announced the Colorado-based Xanterra Parks & Resorts, Inc will replace Glacier Park Incorporated as the Concessioner operating these businesses with the new year.

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Flathead Land Trust
11:16 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Saving room for open space in the Flathead

The current landowner of this 189 acre property on the north shore of Flathead Lake is looking to sell to FWP. If approved, this would add to a neighborhood of conservation lands along the north shore.
Credit Katrin Frye

A Land Trust effort in the Flathead aims to maintain farmland, open space, wildlife habitat, and water quality.    The Flathead Land Trust has been working with the current owner of a 189-acre property along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Land Protection Specialist Laura Katzman with the Flathead Land Trust said the property was originally homesteaded in the 1800’s. The old barn is still there, but the home has since come down.

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Banned, Challenged, Censored
1:54 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

What Maya Angelou, JD Salinger, and the Apostles have in common

Bozeman artist George Cole is one of three involved in the creation of the "Banned, Challenged, Censored" sculpture traveling to Montana libraries this year.
Credit Katrin Frye

Maya Angelou, JD Salinger, and the Apostles all have something in common. The writers of “I Know why the Caged Bird Sings,” “The Catcher in the Rye,” and the Holy Bible have all had their books challenged or banned. Bozeman artists George Cole, Sara Williams and Collin Letts collaborated on the sculpture called “Banned, Challenged, Censored,” the piece features numerous books displayed on individual shelves against a backdrop of pages from other banned books and magazines. There are current books and old classics.

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Working Dogs for Conservation
1:25 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Weed-sniffing dogs take their noses around the world for conservation efforts

Lily plays with her toy after finding the invasive weed Dyer's Woad. She's one of 8 Working Dogs for Conservation, a Missoula based non profit organization.
Credit Katrin Frye

Weed-sniffing dogs are being used as part of the state’s fight on noxious, invasive plants. Dogs and their trainers from the Missoula-based “Working Dogs for Conservation” are being drafted for various conservation-related services across the country, and the world.               

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Montana Coal
4:03 pm
Tue July 30, 2013

To export coal, or not to export coal

Coal development generates money in Montana. Executive Director of the Montana Coal Council Bud Clinch said an average train carrying coal has about 120 cars, and represents about $30,000 of local, state, and federal taxes being paid.

He said Coal is worth continuing to invest in, it’s what Montana has, and the demand for it is not going away.

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Flathead Cherries
3:35 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

Fresh pack, helicopters, and the "last best cherry"

Growers started harvesting cherries along the east shore of Flathead Lake this week.
Credit Katrin Frye

From Polson, north to Bigfork cherry stands which have remained shuttered through the year are just opening up as the cherry harvest starts in Montana.

Some of the growers along the east shore of Flathead Lake are hobby growers with a couple of acres of orchard in their yards scaling down toward the lake, or up to the edge of the mountains.

Many pool their resources and their cherries as part of the Flathead Lake Cherry Growers Cooperative.

Earlier this week harvest started on the first Flathead cherries of the season.

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Native Fisheries
2:11 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Warming water posing a threat to native trout

Bull Trout.
Credit Joel Sartore/ National Geographic & Wade Fredenberg/ USFWS / USFWS

Scientists are studying the effects of global climate change from the peaks to the valley floors in Glacier Park.

They’re also looking in the water.

Fisheries Ecologist Clint Muhlfeld with the US Geological Survey said native west slope cutthroat and bull trout are adaptable, they’ve been adapting to environmental changes for thousands of years.’

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Student Assistance Program
2:20 pm
Mon July 15, 2013

A school program with a non-academic focus

The Student Assistance Program doesn’t involve money for school, or extra study time. It focuses on helping students in something other than academics. It’s a network of support groups offered through a school with focuses varying from grief, to substance abuse, anger, and self-esteem, among others. Whitefish School Psychologist Robin Bissell said SAP came to Whitefish four years ago after the high school lost a student to suicide.

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Main Street Montana Project
4:00 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Forming a "blueprint" for economic growth, town by town

Governor Steve Bullock listens in at an economic round table discussion in Kalispell recently as part of the Main Street Montana Project.
Credit Katrin Frye

Affordable airfare, higher education, low wages, and quality of life are among the challenges and opportunities business leaders from across the state identify as hampering or helping economic growth.  These questions of opportunities and challenges are being asked as part of Governor Steve Bullock’s Main Street Montana Project. Governor Bullock said it’s a bottom up economic development plan to create a blueprint for job growth in Montana.

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