MTPR

Sally Mauk

Senior News Analyst & News Director Emeritus

Retired in 2014 but still a presence at MTPR, Sally Mauk is a University of Kansas graduate and former wilderness ranger who has reported on everything from the legislature to forest fires. She also taught broadcast writing and reporting in the University of Montana journalism school.

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"Campaign Beat" looks at recent campaign finance reports, dueling gun ads in the U.S. House race, the first TV ad from the Curtis campaign, and LR-126, the initiative seeking to repeal election day voter registration.

"Campaign Beat," our weekly political analysis program, appears on Fridays throughout the fall election season. Sally Mauk, former MTPR news director and now senior news analyst, hosts the program. She's  joined by Lee newspapers Capitol Reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison.
 

LR-126 ad from Montanans for Free and Fair Elections:

This election year, Montana's state legislative races look to be the most intriguing. State lawmakers are, "the ones that will actually effect what happens in Montana in terms of policy, as far as who controls the  legislature in 2015," says Lee newspapers Capitol Reporter Mike Dennison.

"Campaign Beat," our weekly political analysis program, appears on Fridays throughout the fall election season.

Former MTPR news director and now senior news analyst, Sally Mauk, hosts the program. She's  joined by Lee newspapers Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison.

This week on "Campaign Beat:" Is the media counting Curtis out too soon? The analysts look at the "good guy" ad by Steve Daines. Ryan Zinke continues to tout his military experience, and John Lewis gets more aggressive in the House race. Sally, Chuck, and Mike wonder if voters have tuned in for this off-year election yet.

"Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program, appears on Fridays throughout the fall election season.

This week "Campaign Beat" examines the new aggressive ads in the U.S. House Race. John Lewis attacks Zinke over his support of the Ryan Budget. Zinke takes aim at Lewis' age and experience. Sally, Chuck and Mike also talk about what parts of Montana trend red or blue, and why.

"Campaign Beat" is our weekly political analysis program. MTPR Senior News Analyst Sally Mauk, is joined by Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison of Lee Newspapers.

Lewis ad:

Eliza Wiley

"Campaign Beat" returns to dissect the latest campaign ads and examine the issues in the U.S. House and Senate races.

Today Sally, Chuck and Mike discuss the competitiveness of the U.S. House and Senate races, the effectiveness of the latest TV ads from the Daines and Lewis campaigns, and whether voters mind the scarcity of debates in the top races. 

The "Timber" ad from the Daines campaign:

Eliza Wiley

Last minute attacks ads - and the importance of the primary races - dominate the discussion on this last spring election season installment of "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program featuring Lee newspaper reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison, and News Director Sally Mauk...

Last Day

May 30, 2014
Josh Burnham

Fantastic memories. To all my wonderful colleagues - past and present - and devoted, thoughtful listeners - thank you, thank you, thank you.

Sally Mauk

        To say Whitney Williams grew up in a political family is a bit of an understatement. Her father Pat served 18 years as Montana's representative in the U.S. House. Her mother Carol was the first woman to serve as both the majority and minority leader in the state senate.
    Whitney worked on several political campaigns, served as the trip director for First Lady Hillary Clinton, and is the founder and CEO of the Seattle-based public policy and philanthropic firm known as williamsworks.

Eliza Wiley

New campaign ads in the U.S. Senate race feature women telling personal stories of rape and domestic violence  - and implying their candidate is the best choice for women. Those new ads, plus reaction to the new lawsuit seeking to overturn Montana's ban on same sex marriage, are the focus of this week's "Campaign Beat", with political analysis by Lee newspapers' reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison, and News Director Sally Mauk.

Sally Mauk

The Missoula police gave local media a tour of new offices and a new interview room they say will add to their improved response to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.
    Sergeant Travis Welsh says the improved facilities are part of the department's agreement with the federal Department of Justice to deal more sensitively with victims.

"They're going to help us relate to victims better," said Welsh. "And be able to understand what we're seeing and what we're hearing as we investigate the cases."

As the incumbent, John Walsh has an apparent advantage over his two opponents - John Bohlinger and Dirk Adams - in the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate.

Eliza Wiley

The political ads and parries are increasing - and changing tone - as the June 3rd primary approaches.

In this edition of "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program, News Director Sally Mauk talks with Lee newspapers' Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison about the rising campaign heat, especially in the high profile races.

-This interview was originally published Nov. 1, 2012

Republican businessman Steve Daines of Bozeman has led the race for the U.S. House both in fundraising and in the polls, but he’s not taking anything for granted. The former executive of RightNow Technologies emphasizes his business experience. In this feature interview, he talks with News Director Sally Mauk about everything from creationism to climate change

One of the two candidates for Missoula county attorney running in the Democratic primary will be the next county attorney - because there are no Republican candidates.
        That person will succeed the retiring incumbent Fred Van Valkenburg, who is locked in a fight with the federal Justice department over how his office has handled past sexual assault cases.
    Both the candidates - Kirsten Pabst and Josh Van de Wetering - have worked in the county attorney's office before and both are now in private practice.

The democratic primary race for Missoula county attorney is more high profile than usual this election - first, since there is no Republican candidate, the winner of the primary will be the next county attorney. Secondly, the current county attorney Fred Van Valkenburg has made headlines because of his legal fight with the federal Justice department over his office's past handling of sexual assault cases.

Former Republican state legislator and lieutenant governor John Bohlinger wants to be Montana's next democratic U.S. Senator.

Bohlinger is an ex-Marine and former Billings businessman who served five terms in the legislature and two terms as the Republican lieutenant governor with democratic Governor Brian Schweitzer.

Eliza Wiley

This week on "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program,  News Director Sally Mauk talks with Lee newspapers Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison about the role of super PACS in the House Republican primary race, who's got the funniest campaign ads (so far), and how many times you can say "Obama" in a 30-second ad...

William Marcus

With the biggest war chest, and the most name recognition, Congressman Steve Daines has a clear edge over his opponents Champ Edmunds and Susan Cundiff in the Republican U.S. Senate primary. The former Bozeman businessman is serving his first - and possibly - last term as Montana's lone representative in the U.S. House. Now he wants to win the Senate seat, long held by democrat Max Baucus, back for the Republican party.
    In this feature interview, Daines talks with News Director Sally Mauk about his campaign - and about some of the current issues facing Congress.

 

Ray Huey has been studying lizards for a long time - but he's finding fewer of them to study. The University of Washington biology professor's research into the evolutionary physiology of lizards and tortoises, especially in the tropics, is finding dramatic impacts from climate change.

Huey was recently a guest lecturer at the University of Montana, and took time to sit down in our studios with News Director Sally Mauk to talk about the evolutionary and ecological effects of our warming climate.
 

The recipient of the 2011 National Humanities Medal is in Missoula to lecture about "the global century." Dr. Stanley Katz is a Princeton University professor, author, president emeritus of the American Council of Learned Societies, and an expert on American legal and constitutional history.
    In this feature interview, Katz talks with News Director Sally Mauk about the difference between the terms "global" and "international" - and the importance of a globally-focused education.

 

Eliza Wiley

Our political analysis show "Campaign Beat" this week looks at the heavy emphasis on the primary candidates' military backgrounds and support for veterans. News Director Sally Mauk talks with Lee newspapers' Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison about the latest ads and messages - and about the many contested Republican legislative races.

As government funding shrinks, nonprofit organizations are  depending more and more upon private donors. Those organizations are also increasingly competing against each other, from a pool of donors that may itself be shrinking.

Kim Klein is an author, publisher, and consultant who works with nonprofits to help them meet their fundraising challenges. She's in Montana this week for some training with nonprofits in Missoula, Helena, Kalispell and Billings.
    Klein says the cuts in government funding are an impossible gap to fill.

 

He's been called "the country's most influential conservative Christian thinker" and he'll be speaking in Missoula this week as part of the President's lecture series at the University of Montana. Robert P. George is a Princeton University professor, author and chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom. He's also past chairman of the National Organization for Marriage, one of the groups opposing the legalization of same sex marriage.

Chris Johns is the first photographer and 9th person to be editor-in-chief of National Geographic magazine. The Oregon native has led the magazine since 2005, and was in Missoula recently to lecture at the University of Montana.
    In this feature interview, Johns talks with News Director Sally Mauk about the magazine's evolution since it was started 125 years ago by Alexander Graham Bell, who headed the National Geographic Society.

Eliza Wiley

Candidates like to brag in their TV ads - but not at all the bragging is perhaps as truthful as it should be. Deceptive ads - and websites - are part of the discussion tonight on "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program featuring News Director Sally Mauk and Lee newspapers'  Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison.

Leon Panetta at UM

Apr 25, 2014
Sally Mauk

The former head of the CIA, Leon Panetta, spoke recently on the University of Montana campus. Panetta has also served as Secretary of Defense, as chief of staff to President Bill Clinton and in Congress as a representative from California from 1977 to 1993.
    As part of the annual Jones/Tamm law school lecture, Panetta was questioned by Washington, D.C. trial attorney Robert Bennett about domestic and foreign policy; here is that conversation in its entirety.

Sally Mauk

In sometimes salty language, the former head of the CIA, Leon Panetta, covered everything from torture to budget deficits in a wide-ranging talk Thursday at the University of Montana. Besides heading the CIA, Panetta also served as Secretary of Defense, and as chief of staff to President Bill Clinton.     

Panetta spoke to a riveted audience at the annual Jones/Tamm law school lecture. He was questioned for about 40 minutes by his friend and famous trial attorney Robert Bennett about domestic and foreign policy.

Violinist Adele Anthony has performed with orchestras and chamber ensembles around the world, and will soon be in Missoula for a concert with the String Orchestra of the Rockies. A native of Tasmania, Anthony studied at Juilliard, and won her first major competition at the age of 13.
    In this feature interview with News Director Sally Mauk, Anthony says her interest in the instrument began at a very young age.

In an unusual step, Governor Steve Bullock has sent a two-page letter to the state Board of Pardons and Parole, outlining why he thinks the board should recommend clemency for convicted murderer Barry Beach. The board is set to hear Beach's application for clemency April 29th. Beach has already served 30 years of a 100-year sentence for the 1979 murder of Poplar teen Kim Nees. He has long maintained his innocence, and was granted a new trial by a district judge in 2011.

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