MTPR

Sally Mauk

Senior News Analyst & News Director Emeritus

Retired in 2014 but still a presence at MTPR, Sally Mauk is a University of Kansas graduate and former wilderness ranger who has reported on everything from the legislature to forest fires. She also taught broadcast writing and reporting in the University of Montana journalism school.

Ways to Connect

Is America too religious - or not religious enough? Does our government truly separate church and state?
    The D.C. and New York-based Center for Inquiry would answer yes to the first question and no to the second. The Center lobbies and litigates for separation of church and state, and advocates for what it calls scientific naturalism.
    President and CEO Ronald Lindsay is in Montana this week to talk about his new book titled "The Necessity of Secularism." 

Eliza Wiley

Candidates in Montana's high profile U.S. House and Senate races are gearing up their campaigns, as the primary is just six weeks away. Those who've raised the most money have new ads on TV, and messages they hope will resonate with voters.

In this edition of "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program, News Director Sally Mauk talks with Lee newspapers' Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison, about who's leading the money race in the House and Senate campaigns - and who's got the TV ads generating the most buzz.

27 million people around the world - in every country - are being held in modern slavery. Many are women and young children, living in despicable, inhumane conditions, and exploited sexually, physically and emotionally.
    This week, the Mansfield Center at the University of Montana has tried to shine a light on this slavery, with a conference titled "Fight for Hope and Freedom: Human Trafficking, Montana and the World."

More big changes are in store for hospital medical care in Missoula. Providence St. Patrick hospital announced today it is adding comprehensive women's and children's services, including obstetrical and newborn care, and a Level 2 neonatal intensive care unit. The new services will duplicate services at Missoula's other hospital - Community Medical Center - and the announcement comes in the wake of Community's recent decision to become a for-profit hospital under the new ownership of the Billings Clinic and Regional Care Network.

Thirteen percent of the American population is over 65 years  old, and the average life expectancy by 2020 is projected to be 80. Add to those facts a decreasing number of people available to care for the elderly, and you have what many gerontologists believe is a looming crisis.
    Most of those elderly do not want to go to an assisted living facility or a nursing home; they want to grow old and die at home. But few are planning how best to do that.

Lieutenant Governor Angela Mclean
Dan Boyce

Angela McLean has only had her new job a couple of months - and it looks like a good fit. Governor Steve Bullock appointed the former Anaconda high school teacher to be his lieutenant governor in February, to replace John Walsh, who replaced Max Baucus in the U.S. Senate.

Bob Nichols, USDA

Growing up on the Mescalero Apache Indian reservation in New Mexico, Arthur "Butch" Blazer hunted and fished and spent all his time outdoors. He translated that love of the outdoors into a career, as a natural resources manager with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, then as the first Native American appointed state forester for New Mexico, and now as the Deputy Undersecretary for Natural Resources and Environment for the U.S. Department of Agriculture - where he oversees the U.S. Forest Service.

Kris Snibbe, Harvard staff photographer

Rowena He was a teenager in China when the Tiananmen democracy protests began. The June 4th, 1989 massacre, when the Chinese government moved in to murder many of the protesters, marked a turning point for her, and many others of her generation.

Sally Mauk

Opponents of trapping hope to get enough signatures to get Initiative 169 - which would ban trapping on public lands - on the November ballot.
    The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks department reports there are between 5000 and 6000 trapping licenses sold annually. In 2012 those trappers caught 67,000 furbearers - everything from beaver to wolverine. They also, unintentionally, caught an occasional dog, and other non-targeted animals. 

Dirk Adams for Senate campaign

Born in Nebraska, educated at Harvard, with stints as a New York trial attorney, California banker and now Montana rancher - Dirk Adams of Wilsall wants to be Montana's next U.S. Senator. The political newcomer Adams is running against former lieutenant governor John Bohlinger and recently-appointed Senator John Walsh in the June democratic primary.

In this feature interview, Adams talks with News Director Sally Mauk about his background, why he's running, and his stance on the issues.

 

Sally Mauk

The city of Missoula has filed to obtain its privately owned water system through eminent domain. The complaint was filed in District Court. The city has been trying to negotiate a purchase of the Mountain Water company from its owner, the Carlyle Group, but has not been able to reach agreement. Missoula is the only major Montana city not to own its water system, and Mayor John Engen says it's in the public's best interest to control its water. He says the current owner is only interested in profit and has not been a good steward of the water system.

Last year, 37,000 Montanans were the victims of crime, according to the state Board of Crime Control. 30 years ago, there were very few services for crime victims, but today every state has those services - everything from counseling to advocacy - and every state has a crime victims' compensation fund.
    Next week is National Crime Victims' Rights Week, which has been held every year since 1981 to increase public awareness of victims' rights and services.

Montana women earn 67 cents on the dollar of what men make, placing us 39th in the country when it comes to the gender pay gap. That fact prompted Governor Steve Bullock to form an Equal Pay for Equal Work task force, and to co-sponsor a summit on equal pay that kicks off tonight, and runs through tomorrow, at Montana State University in Bozeman.
    State Labor commissioner Pam Bucy is co-chair of the equal pay task force and a participant in tomorrow's summit.

Montanans are getting accustomed to smoky summers, as our fire seasons have gotten longer and more intense in recent years. Get ready for things to get worse. A recent report on the effects of climate change on forest ecosystems says the number of acres burned by wildfire will at least double this century. The report is part of a National Climate Assessment presented to Congress and the President. Forest service research scientist David Peterson is one of the three editors of that report.

Jerry O'Malley

Since 2003, the University of Montana's dining services have bought six and a half million dollars worth of food - everything from lentils to beef - from Montana farmers and ranchers, under the Farm to College program. The program was created out of a partnership between students in the Environmental Studies program and UM's Dining Services, and has grown every year.
    News Director Sally Mauk visited one of the Dining Services kitchens - and a new on-campus garden - to learn more about the program, and UM's increasing commitment to buying,  and growing, local.

 

Bryan Gruley is an award-winning mystery writer and a Pulitzer prize-winning reporter - and he's delivering the annual Jeff Cole memorial lecture at the University of Montana this evening. Gruley is now a feature reporter for Bloomberg News, after working many years for the Wall Street Journal. He was part of a team of Journal reporters who won the Pulitzer for their coverage of the 9/11 attacks.

In this feature interview, Gruley talks with News Director Sally Mauk about the enormous changes in the journalism profession - and about the challenges of covering 9/11.

It's Women's History Month, and as we reported earlier, part of the observance at the University of Montana, was a talk this week on the historical role of women in the U.S. Indian Service. University of New Mexico historian Cathleen Cahill  is the author of the book "Federal Fathers and Mothers: A Social History of the United States Indian Service, 1869-1933."

As we reported yesterday, the University of Montana has reached an agreement with the federal Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights, assuring that UM will provide better access for disabled students to campus technology.

Amy Capolupo is Director of UM Disability Services for Students. In this feature interview, she talks with News Director Sally Mauk about the agreement, which grew out of complaints from several disabled students about the lack of access.

 

Land managers from Montana, Alberta and British Columbia are gathering in Missoula this week to talk about managing the Crown of the Continent ecosystem for climate change. Participants include government agencies, non-profit organizations, academics and tribal representatives.
    The executive director of the Seattle-based nonprofit organization known as "EcoAdapt", Lara Hansen, is one of the forum's featured speakers.

One in five kids goes hungry in America - a statistic the national "No Kid Hungry" campaign hopes to change. Bill Shore is the founder of the national nonprofit working to end childhood hunger in America, and Oscar-winning actor, and part-time Montana resident, Jeff Bridges is the campaign's national spokesman.

Mike Covey went to work for the Plum Creek timber company right after getting his forestry degree from the University of Montana in 1980, and stayed with Plum Creek for 23 years. Covey is now chairman and CEO of the Spokane-based Potlatch Corporation, another big timber holder in the Pacific Northwest.

Covey was in Missoula this week to lecture at his alma mater and he also took time to sit down in our studios with News Director Sally Mauk, to talk about the sweeping changes in the timber industry in the last few decades.

 

A critic of American military intervention is in Missoula to deliver a talk in the President's lecture series at the University of Montana. Andrew Bacevich  is a retired Army colonel, author and historian who teaches international relations and history at Boston University.

In this feature interview, Bacevich talks with News Director Sally Mauk about what he calls the "new American militarism".

The modern evangelical movement is diverse - and contradictory. That's just one of the points of a new book that takes a historical look at the evolution of American evangelicals. The book is titled "Apostles of Reason: The Crisis of Authority in American Evangelicalism" and was written by University of North Carolina historian Molly Worthen.

A recent national Gallup poll lists Montana as the least obese state in the country. Only 19.6 percent of Montana's population is obese - the only state to come in under 20 percent. Nationally, more than one third of adults are obese. Mississippi is the fattest state, with 36.4 percent of their population rated as obese.

Mount Sentinel reopened

Mar 10, 2014

Conditions have improved enough that University of Montana officials have reopened Mount Sentinel to the public. Most of the east side of Campus Drive has also been reopened to parking.

Sally Mauk

Falling rocks and snow slides have prompted University of Montana officials to close Mount Sentinel until further notice. Much of the east side of Campus Drive has also been closed to vehicle parking because of the danger of rockslides. The drive itself remains open to moving traffic. Here's a link for campus safety updates:

http://umt.edu/safety/alerts/default.php

Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes

$18.3 million dollars - that's the price an arbitration panel has set for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes to buy Kerr Dam near Polson from PPL Montana. It's a price close to what the tribes think is fair, and well below what PPL was asking.
    The panel's decision paves the way for the Salish and Kootenai to become the first tribe in the country to own a major hydroelectric facility. Brian Lipscomb is CEO of Energy Keepers - the tribal corporation involved in the dam negotiation and eventual operation. 

Photo of the day

Mar 6, 2014
Sally Mauk

Weather got you feeling like climbing the walls? UM resource conservation major Shannon Pepper has the UM rec center climbing wall repaired and ready...

Jeremiah Petersen

As a member of Missoula County's search and rescue team for six years, and its current chief, Joshua Herbold has been involved in dozens of rescues and recoveries. But even for this veteran, last Friday was unique for Herbold's team: a first-ever residential avalanche rescue, followed immediately by two skiers lost near Missoula's Snobowl.

Missoulian

Missoula lost an important voice this week, when long time Missoulian reporter Betsy Cohen died of breast cancer. The 49-year-old Cohen's byline appeared on thousands of stories in her 18-year journalism career, first as a reporter for the Montana Standard, and since 1998, for the Missoulian.

Cohen's work garnered numerous awards and the respect and admiration of her many peers, newsmakers and readers.
    News Director Sally Mauk spoke this week with some of Cohen's friends and colleagues and has this remembrance.

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