Sally Mauk

News Director Emeritus

Retired in 2014 but still a presence at MTPR, Sally Mauk is a University of Kansas graduate and former wilderness ranger who has reported on everything from the legislature to forest fires. She also taught broadcast writing and reporting in the University of Montana journalism school.

Ways To Connect

Chris Johns is the first photographer and 9th person to be editor-in-chief of National Geographic magazine. The Oregon native has led the magazine since 2005, and was in Missoula recently to lecture at the University of Montana.
    In this feature interview, Johns talks with News Director Sally Mauk about the magazine's evolution since it was started 125 years ago by Alexander Graham Bell, who headed the National Geographic Society.

Eliza Wiley

Candidates like to brag in their TV ads - but not at all the bragging is perhaps as truthful as it should be. Deceptive ads - and websites - are part of the discussion tonight on "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program featuring News Director Sally Mauk and Lee newspapers'  Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison.

Leon Panetta at UM

Apr 25, 2014
Sally Mauk

The former head of the CIA, Leon Panetta, spoke recently on the University of Montana campus. Panetta has also served as Secretary of Defense, as chief of staff to President Bill Clinton and in Congress as a representative from California from 1977 to 1993.
    As part of the annual Jones/Tamm law school lecture, Panetta was questioned by Washington, D.C. trial attorney Robert Bennett about domestic and foreign policy; here is that conversation in its entirety.

Sally Mauk

In sometimes salty language, the former head of the CIA, Leon Panetta, covered everything from torture to budget deficits in a wide-ranging talk Thursday at the University of Montana. Besides heading the CIA, Panetta also served as Secretary of Defense, and as chief of staff to President Bill Clinton.     

Panetta spoke to a riveted audience at the annual Jones/Tamm law school lecture. He was questioned for about 40 minutes by his friend and famous trial attorney Robert Bennett about domestic and foreign policy.

Violinist Adele Anthony has performed with orchestras and chamber ensembles around the world, and will soon be in Missoula for a concert with the String Orchestra of the Rockies. A native of Tasmania, Anthony studied at Juilliard, and won her first major competition at the age of 13.
    In this feature interview with News Director Sally Mauk, Anthony says her interest in the instrument began at a very young age.

In an unusual step, Governor Steve Bullock has sent a two-page letter to the state Board of Pardons and Parole, outlining why he thinks the board should recommend clemency for convicted murderer Barry Beach. The board is set to hear Beach's application for clemency April 29th. Beach has already served 30 years of a 100-year sentence for the 1979 murder of Poplar teen Kim Nees. He has long maintained his innocence, and was granted a new trial by a district judge in 2011.

Is America too religious - or not religious enough? Does our government truly separate church and state?
    The D.C. and New York-based Center for Inquiry would answer yes to the first question and no to the second. The Center lobbies and litigates for separation of church and state, and advocates for what it calls scientific naturalism.
    President and CEO Ronald Lindsay is in Montana this week to talk about his new book titled "The Necessity of Secularism." 

Eliza Wiley

Candidates in Montana's high profile U.S. House and Senate races are gearing up their campaigns, as the primary is just six weeks away. Those who've raised the most money have new ads on TV, and messages they hope will resonate with voters.

In this edition of "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program, News Director Sally Mauk talks with Lee newspapers' Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison, about who's leading the money race in the House and Senate campaigns - and who's got the TV ads generating the most buzz.

27 million people around the world - in every country - are being held in modern slavery. Many are women and young children, living in despicable, inhumane conditions, and exploited sexually, physically and emotionally.
    This week, the Mansfield Center at the University of Montana has tried to shine a light on this slavery, with a conference titled "Fight for Hope and Freedom: Human Trafficking, Montana and the World."

More big changes are in store for hospital medical care in Missoula. Providence St. Patrick hospital announced today it is adding comprehensive women's and children's services, including obstetrical and newborn care, and a Level 2 neonatal intensive care unit. The new services will duplicate services at Missoula's other hospital - Community Medical Center - and the announcement comes in the wake of Community's recent decision to become a for-profit hospital under the new ownership of the Billings Clinic and Regional Care Network.

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