Sally Mauk

News Director Emeritus

Retired in 2014 but still a presence at MTPR, Sally Mauk is a University of Kansas graduate and former wilderness ranger who has reported on everything from the legislature to forest fires. She also taught broadcast writing and reporting in the University of Montana journalism school.

Ways To Connect

Thirteen percent of the American population is over 65 years  old, and the average life expectancy by 2020 is projected to be 80. Add to those facts a decreasing number of people available to care for the elderly, and you have what many gerontologists believe is a looming crisis.
    Most of those elderly do not want to go to an assisted living facility or a nursing home; they want to grow old and die at home. But few are planning how best to do that.

Dan Boyce

Angela McLean has only had her new job a couple of months - and it looks like a good fit. Governor Steve Bullock appointed the former Anaconda high school teacher to be his lieutenant governor in February, to replace John Walsh, who replaced Max Baucus in the U.S. Senate.

Bob Nichols, USDA

Growing up on the Mescalero Apache Indian reservation in New Mexico, Arthur "Butch" Blazer hunted and fished and spent all his time outdoors. He translated that love of the outdoors into a career, as a natural resources manager with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, then as the first Native American appointed state forester for New Mexico, and now as the Deputy Undersecretary for Natural Resources and Environment for the U.S. Department of Agriculture - where he oversees the U.S. Forest Service.

Kris Snibbe, Harvard staff photographer

Rowena He was a teenager in China when the Tiananmen democracy protests began. The June 4th, 1989 massacre, when the Chinese government moved in to murder many of the protesters, marked a turning point for her, and many others of her generation.

Sally Mauk

Opponents of trapping hope to get enough signatures to get Initiative 169 - which would ban trapping on public lands - on the November ballot.
    The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks department reports there are between 5000 and 6000 trapping licenses sold annually. In 2012 those trappers caught 67,000 furbearers - everything from beaver to wolverine. They also, unintentionally, caught an occasional dog, and other non-targeted animals. 

Dirk Adams for Senate campaign

Born in Nebraska, educated at Harvard, with stints as a New York trial attorney, California banker and now Montana rancher - Dirk Adams of Wilsall wants to be Montana's next U.S. Senator. The political newcomer Adams is running against former lieutenant governor John Bohlinger and recently-appointed Senator John Walsh in the June democratic primary.

In this feature interview, Adams talks with News Director Sally Mauk about his background, why he's running, and his stance on the issues.

 

Sally Mauk

The city of Missoula has filed to obtain its privately owned water system through eminent domain. The complaint was filed in District Court. The city has been trying to negotiate a purchase of the Mountain Water company from its owner, the Carlyle Group, but has not been able to reach agreement. Missoula is the only major Montana city not to own its water system, and Mayor John Engen says it's in the public's best interest to control its water. He says the current owner is only interested in profit and has not been a good steward of the water system.

Last year, 37,000 Montanans were the victims of crime, according to the state Board of Crime Control. 30 years ago, there were very few services for crime victims, but today every state has those services - everything from counseling to advocacy - and every state has a crime victims' compensation fund.
    Next week is National Crime Victims' Rights Week, which has been held every year since 1981 to increase public awareness of victims' rights and services.

Montana women earn 67 cents on the dollar of what men make, placing us 39th in the country when it comes to the gender pay gap. That fact prompted Governor Steve Bullock to form an Equal Pay for Equal Work task force, and to co-sponsor a summit on equal pay that kicks off tonight, and runs through tomorrow, at Montana State University in Bozeman.
    State Labor commissioner Pam Bucy is co-chair of the equal pay task force and a participant in tomorrow's summit.

Montanans are getting accustomed to smoky summers, as our fire seasons have gotten longer and more intense in recent years. Get ready for things to get worse. A recent report on the effects of climate change on forest ecosystems says the number of acres burned by wildfire will at least double this century. The report is part of a National Climate Assessment presented to Congress and the President. Forest service research scientist David Peterson is one of the three editors of that report.

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