Sally Mauk

News Director Emeritus

Retired in 2014 but still a presence at MTPR, Sally Mauk is a University of Kansas graduate and former wilderness ranger who has reported on everything from the legislature to forest fires. She also taught broadcast writing and reporting in the University of Montana journalism school.

Ways To Connect

Is America too religious - or not religious enough? Does our government truly separate church and state?
    The D.C. and New York-based Center for Inquiry would answer yes to the first question and no to the second. The Center lobbies and litigates for separation of church and state, and advocates for what it calls scientific naturalism.
    President and CEO Ronald Lindsay is in Montana this week to talk about his new book titled "The Necessity of Secularism." 

Eliza Wiley

Candidates in Montana's high profile U.S. House and Senate races are gearing up their campaigns, as the primary is just six weeks away. Those who've raised the most money have new ads on TV, and messages they hope will resonate with voters.

In this edition of "Campaign Beat", our weekly political analysis program, News Director Sally Mauk talks with Lee newspapers' Capitol reporters Chuck Johnson and Mike Dennison, about who's leading the money race in the House and Senate campaigns - and who's got the TV ads generating the most buzz.

27 million people around the world - in every country - are being held in modern slavery. Many are women and young children, living in despicable, inhumane conditions, and exploited sexually, physically and emotionally.
    This week, the Mansfield Center at the University of Montana has tried to shine a light on this slavery, with a conference titled "Fight for Hope and Freedom: Human Trafficking, Montana and the World."

More big changes are in store for hospital medical care in Missoula. Providence St. Patrick hospital announced today it is adding comprehensive women's and children's services, including obstetrical and newborn care, and a Level 2 neonatal intensive care unit. The new services will duplicate services at Missoula's other hospital - Community Medical Center - and the announcement comes in the wake of Community's recent decision to become a for-profit hospital under the new ownership of the Billings Clinic and Regional Care Network.

Thirteen percent of the American population is over 65 years  old, and the average life expectancy by 2020 is projected to be 80. Add to those facts a decreasing number of people available to care for the elderly, and you have what many gerontologists believe is a looming crisis.
    Most of those elderly do not want to go to an assisted living facility or a nursing home; they want to grow old and die at home. But few are planning how best to do that.

Dan Boyce

Angela McLean has only had her new job a couple of months - and it looks like a good fit. Governor Steve Bullock appointed the former Anaconda high school teacher to be his lieutenant governor in February, to replace John Walsh, who replaced Max Baucus in the U.S. Senate.

Bob Nichols, USDA

Growing up on the Mescalero Apache Indian reservation in New Mexico, Arthur "Butch" Blazer hunted and fished and spent all his time outdoors. He translated that love of the outdoors into a career, as a natural resources manager with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, then as the first Native American appointed state forester for New Mexico, and now as the Deputy Undersecretary for Natural Resources and Environment for the U.S. Department of Agriculture - where he oversees the U.S. Forest Service.

Kris Snibbe, Harvard staff photographer

Rowena He was a teenager in China when the Tiananmen democracy protests began. The June 4th, 1989 massacre, when the Chinese government moved in to murder many of the protesters, marked a turning point for her, and many others of her generation.

Sally Mauk

Opponents of trapping hope to get enough signatures to get Initiative 169 - which would ban trapping on public lands - on the November ballot.
    The Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks department reports there are between 5000 and 6000 trapping licenses sold annually. In 2012 those trappers caught 67,000 furbearers - everything from beaver to wolverine. They also, unintentionally, caught an occasional dog, and other non-targeted animals. 

Dirk Adams for Senate campaign

Born in Nebraska, educated at Harvard, with stints as a New York trial attorney, California banker and now Montana rancher - Dirk Adams of Wilsall wants to be Montana's next U.S. Senator. The political newcomer Adams is running against former lieutenant governor John Bohlinger and recently-appointed Senator John Walsh in the June democratic primary.

In this feature interview, Adams talks with News Director Sally Mauk about his background, why he's running, and his stance on the issues.

 

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