Sally Mauk

News Director Emeritus

Retired in 2014 but still a presence at MTPR, Sally Mauk is a University of Kansas graduate and former wilderness ranger who has reported on everything from the legislature to forest fires. She also taught broadcast writing and reporting in the University of Montana journalism school.

Ways To Connect

William Marcus

The former campaign manager for President Barack Obama, Jim Messina, was in Missoula over the weekend to deliver the commencement address to his alma mater, the University of Montana.

John and Sue Talbot

Missoulians John and Sue Talbot will receive Honorary Doctorates of Humane Letters at the University of Montana commencement ceremony tomorrow.

photo courtesy Kate Kendall

U.S.G.S. research ecologist Kate Kendall has been studying grizzly bears for over 30 years and done groundbreaking research into the grizzlies that live in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem.

Courtesy Fort Missoula Historical Museum

Fort Missoula has undergone several incarnations since it was built in the late 19th century. Tate Jones, the Executive Director of the Rocky Mountain Museum of Military History, has a new book out that gives a pictorial history of the fort.

In this feature interview, Jones talks with News Director Sally Mauk about that colorful history - everything from the fort's involvement in the Battle of the Big Hole to the internment of Japanese civilians during World War II. The fort was created in 1877.

Sally Mauk

Our warm temperatures are forecast to last through the weekend, and that means rivers and streams will continue to quickly rise. LeeAnn Allegretto of the National Weather Service says the biggest flooding threat currently is in Lincoln and Flathead counties.

“Right now the only river that may reach flood stage is the Yaak river near Troy,” said Allegretto.”But the Flathead river and all its branches will also see dramatic rises.”

A warm weekend makes it tempting to want to get out onto the rivers, but Allegretto recommends resisting the temptation.

Sally Mauk

  Civil rights attorney and co-founder of the National Innocence Project Peter Neufeld and others have been instrumental in winning the freedom of over 300 people wrongly convicted of crimes, through the use of DNA evidence.