MTPR

Sarah Aronson

Sarah Aronson is the host and producer of "The Write Question" on Montana Public Radio.

"I think probably every writer, at some level, has 'the story' that’s just compelling and it’s the thing you just can’t stop picking at," says author Carrie La Seur, "And so even the third novel that I’m working on now—that’s very different characters and very different places—there’s a theme of exile and return and tension between the “leavers” and the “stayers.” That must just be my story, that’s the thing I can’t stop writing about even when I very deliberately take off in a different direction.

Listen in now for more on "The Weight of an Infinite Sky" with Carrie La Seur.

Buck Buchanan and Christina Wald

"My name is Denni-Jo and I’m a real-life cowgirl. I ride horses and rope cattle on our ranch. We have horses, cows, dogs, and cats—which means plenty of chores. It doesn’t matter if you are a boy or girl, big or small; everyone pitches in and does their share. Once the chores are done there’s plenty of time for fun— and surprises! Join me, and my pony, Pinto, on an adventure neither of us will soon forget. Saddle up and let’s go!" -- Buck Buchanan

Between 1864 and 1889, the buffalo were exterminated, the Indian wars ended, tribal nations were confined to reservations, cattle and sheep by the tens of thousands grazed the open range, Butte exploded into a city with electricity and millionaires, and multiple railroads connected Montana to the world. “Montana 1889” tells the many stories of this overwhelming transformation by entering into the lives, emotions, and decisions of Indians, miners, cowboys, women, and entrepreneurs who were cooperating and competing in the new state.

We are excited to offer an exclusive extended interview with Ken Egan about his book Montana 1889 via our podcast and web streaming.  

About the Book: 

An irreverent, twisty, time travel comedy!

What if you could make a change to history that would eliminate the Spanish Inquisition, American slavery, World War II, global warming, and an egomaniacal US president who thought he was smart enough to drop nuclear bombs here and there without negative consequences? What if that change also made the United States and 5 billion people poof from existence? Would you do it?

Riverbend Publishing

In these stories, Patterson explores what it is to grow up female in the American West. As her narratives reveal the lives of travelers, homemakers, radio show announcers, mothers, teachers, dancers, shop clerks, and the subterranean world of girls, they take the reader from a ferry dock in Resurrection Bay, Alaska, to a two-room school in the Bitterroot Valley, from brash, backpacking college students to young new mothers on the edge, from the 1920s to the 1990s. In Ballet at the Moose Lodge, Patterson explores in delicate and searing prose the visible and invisible negotiations women make to navigate lives bound by the rugged western landscape.

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