Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has announced a reduction in U.S. diplomatic staff in the country and restrictions on travel by U.S. citizens there –- as he accused Washington of "gringo" meddling.

The BBC reports:

"The president said that the US government had 100 employees working in Venezuela whereas Venezuela had 17 based in the US.

Astronauts at the International Space Station have ventured outside to perform a challenging cable installation on their orbiting platform.

Spacewalkers Terry Virts and Butch Wilmore have 400 feet of cable to install as well as two sets of antennas.

Updated at 10:08 a.m. ET

Tens of thousands of people are gathering in the Russian capital to mourn Boris Nemtsov, the former deputy prime minister turned harsh critic of President Vladimir Putin who was gunned down on a Moscow street last week.

The march, originally scheduled to oppose Russian involvement in Ukraine, was to have been led by Nemtsov himself. Following his murder, however, the gathering has turned into a wake for the fallen opposition leader.

Days after video emerged showing self-declared Islamic State extremists taking sledge hammers to pre-Islamic antiquities inside the Mosul museum, the Iraqi government has reopened the country's national museum, shuttered since the 2003 U.S. invasion of the country that toppled Saddam Hussein.

A court in Egypt has declared Hamas a "terrorist organization."

The verdict concerning Hamas, which controls Gaza, is seen as part of the government of President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi's crackdown on Islamist groups.

Hamas is an offshoot of the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamist party that was banned in Egypt after President Mohamed Morsi was ousted in 2013.

The Associated Press reports:

"Last month, an Egyptian court banned Hamas' military wing, the Izzedine al-Qassam Brigades, and also designated it a terrorist organization. ...

Western leaders are pressuring Moscow for a full and transparent investigation into the fatal shooting of opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, a staunch opponent of President Vladimir Putin.

Nemtsov, 55, a deputy prime minister in the 1990s who later organized mass rallies against Putin in 2011 and 2012. Most recently, he accused Putin allies of profiteering from the development of the Sochi Winter Olympics infrastructure.

As we reported late Friday, the House managed to approve a one-week extension of funding for the Department of Homeland Security, which President Obama signed. The passage capped a day of scrambling that saw a longer three-week stopgap shot down in the House.

A bomb blast at a rally in eastern Ukraine has killed two people on the first anniversary of the ouster of President Viktor Yanukovych, an event that helped trigger Russia's annexation of Crimea and a separatist uprising.

Ukraine's Interior Ministry described the blast at a pro-Kiev rally in Kharkiv as an act of terrorism and said it had been caused by a bomb. It said a police officer was among the dead and that about a dozen other people were wounded.

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson says he's taking seriously a call by Islamist extremists for attacks on shopping malls in the West, including Minnesota's giant Mall of America.

In an interview on CNN's State of the Union program, Johnson said a video released by the Somali-based group al-Shabab "reflects [a] new phase" in which terrorist networks publicly call "for independent actors in their homelands to carry out attacks.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Grammy-winning trumpeter and composer Clark Terry, who recorded with the likes of Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Quincy Jones, has died at age 94.

Gwen Terry wrote that her husband "has joined the big band in heaven where he'll be singing and playing with the angels.

"He left us peacefully, surrounded by his family, students and friends," she wrote on his Facebook page Saturday. She did not say when he died.

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