Sue Ginn

Business Manager

Sue is a native Missoulian.  She has worked at the University of Montana for more than 15 years, 10 of them at Montana Public Radio.  

Ways To Connect

02/22/2015 - Segment 1:  Culture of Secrecy Leaves Door Open for Sex Abuse; Segment 2: Torture Tactics Go Beyond the CIA; Segment 3: Duking it out With Telecom Giants

http://www.revealnews.org/episodes/the-secrets-of-church-state-and-business/

02/22/2015 - Malcolm X's life represents an extraordinary evolution and transformation from street hustler and ex-con to an intellectual visionary with a race and class analysis. He went from being a narrow nationalist to incorporating a broad global perspective. He articulated a strong challenge to the system of power and privilege. Consequently, the FBI wiretapped Malcolm, read his mail, and kept him under surveillance.

02/15/2015 - The gains achieved by the Civil Rights movement are fond memories and are celebrated by holidays, memorials and pious speeches. Today, the U.S. has its first black president but while he’s attained political power many other African Americans are behind bars. The eternal war on drugs has resulted in the incarceration of many blacks.

02/08/2015 - From Tamir Rice to Akai Gurley the names of African American men and boys killed by police keep piling up. The lack of a grand jury indictment in the Michael Brown case in Ferguson sparked a protest movement with signs and shouts of “Hands Up. Don’t Shoot” and “Black Lives Matter.” The death of Eric Garner in New York was videoed around the world. His plea of “I Can’t Breathe” became a rallying cry. Many people are asking where is justice? Illusions have been shattered that we live in a "post-racial" society. Fundamental questions are being raised.

2/15/2015 - In late 2014, Amazon and the publishing house Hachette settled a months-long dispute over who should set the price for e-books. In Amazon’s view, lower prices mean more sales and more readers, and that benefits everyone. But for publishers, the price of an e-book must reflect the investment made, from the author’s advance to a book’s production. The conflict, resolved for now, has only raised more questions about the value of books, Amazon’s business practices, and the role of publishers. Is book publishing an oligopoly, a dinosaur in need of disruption?

MTPR Radio Theater

Feb 5, 2015

02/08/2015 - UM journalism professor Ray Ekness loves old radio plays. “I've always been interested in radio dramas going back to my days in college listening to War of the Worlds.”  Ekness produced two versions of War of the Worlds with an MTPR cast last year, one faithful to the original script and one very funny Montana version.

02/01/2014 -– Reveal – A new monthly series from The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX. In this episode, hear stories including a look at the surrogacy industry, how Americans may not be protected from many toxic chemicals, loopholes in daycare data, and much, much more.

http://www.revealnews.org/episodes/

01/25/2015 - The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there’s plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning.

01/11/2015 - Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

01/04/2015 - Talks about protecting the climate are peppered with Megawatts and BTU’s; parts per million and fugitive methane; wind velocity and crop yields. All these terms can make your head spin – even if you understand and accept that humans are frying the Earth. But behind the numbers are hearts and minds. And that’s what we’re talking about today. How do people think about climate change? Why aren’t more Americans engaged and actively addressing the most pressing issue of our times? And how do social groups shape individual attitudes toward climate disruption?

12/28/2014 - The end of the year is nigh! Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot look back at The Best Albums of 2014. What did 2014 sound like? What are the albums you need to know about? And what albums should you put under the tree? Find out during this special FREE hour of Sound Opinions. Available to all stations.

https://beta.prx.org/stories/137447

Hanukkah Lights 2014

Dec 16, 2014

12/21/2014 - A perennial NPR favorite with brand new Hanukkah stories written by acclaimed authors Debra Ginsberg, Anne Burt, Simone Zelitch, Andy Borowitz, and Theodore Bikel.  Hear a wide variety of stories perfect for the holiday.  Hosted by Susan Stamberg and Murray Horwitz.

Jurisdiction

Dec 16, 2014

12/19/2014 - What do a duck hunt and a jealous spouse have in common? Just a profound effect on international relations and in existential struggle at the heart of how the US is governed.  This hour, we ask who gets to set the rules for the rest of us - from how the intentions of long-dead founding fathers still push and pull us today, to the front lines of a raging musical battle over the soul of hip-hop.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/jurisdiction/

Inheritance

Dec 16, 2014

12/12/2014 - Once a kid is born, their genetic fate is pretty much sealed.  Or is it? This hour, we put nature and nurture on a collision course and discover how outside forces can find a way inside us, shaping not just our hearts and minds, but the basic biological blueprint that we pass on to future generations.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/251876-inheritance/

Where Am I?

Dec 16, 2014

12/05/2014 - How does your brain keep track of your body? This hour Radiolab tells stories of the mind-body link gone terribly wrong. We'll puzzle through the mysteries of missing limbs and hear about a novel treatment involving optical illusions.  Plus, the story of a butcher who suddenly lost his entire sense of touch, and we hear from pilots who suffer out-of-body experiences while flying fighter jets.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91524-where-am-i/

Stochasticity

Dec 16, 2014

11/28/2014 - Stochasticity (a wonderfully slippery and smarty-pants word for randomness) may be at the very foundation of our lives.  To understand how big a role it plays, we look at chance and patterns in sports, lottery tickets, and even the cells in our own body.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91684-stochasticity/

Emergence

Dec 16, 2014

11/21/2014 - What happens when there is no leader?  Starlings, bees, and ants manage just fine. In fact, they form staggeringly complicated societies - all without a Toscanini to conduct them into harmony.  This hour we ask how this happens.  We gaze down at the bottom-up logic of cities, Google, and even our very own brains with fire-flyologists, ant experts, neurologists, a mathematician, and an economist.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91500-emergence/

Speed

Dec 16, 2014

11/15/2014 - We live our lives at human speed, we experience and interact with the world on a human time scale.  But this hour, we put ourselves through the paces, peek inside a microsecond, and master the fastest thing in the universe.  We'll take a look at the longest running science experiment in history and team up with NPR's Planet Money to try to wrap our heads around the speed of high frequency trading.

http://www.radiolab.org/search/?q=Speed#q=Speed

Galapagos

Dec 16, 2014

11/08/2014 - Is it inevitable that even our most sacred natural landscapes will one day be swallowed up by humans?  This hour: the strange story of a small group of islands going through some very big changes, and just how far we're willing to go to stop their transformation.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/galapagos/

War of the Worlds

Dec 16, 2014

11/01/2014 - On this hour, a deep dive into one of the most controversial moments in broadcasting history:  Orson Welles' 1938 radio play about Martians invading New Jersey, "The Ware of the Worlds."

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91622-war-of-the-worlds/

Inner Voices

Dec 16, 2014

10/25/2014 - This hour we explore the voices inside our heads.  From a child forming his or her first thought to the nagging feeling that you're bound to fail, we'll delve into all the ways that the voices in our heads shape us, help us, and sometimes hurt us.  Along the way, tell the story of Mel Blanc, "the man of 1000 voices," and how one of those voices might have saved his life.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/301401-inner-voices/

Hidden Kitchens World

Dec 11, 2014

12/14/2014 - The Kitchen Sisters and PRX present Hidden Kitchens World, a new hour of kitchen stories that travel the world. A broadcast special rich with great stories, music, sound, host and guest stars – Academy Award-winner Frances McDormand, Gael Garcia Bernal (star of Motorcycle Diaries and Jon Stewart’s new film, Rosewater), Werner Herzog, Salman Rushdie and Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

12/07/2014 - Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt were the “first couple” of American radio. From the 1920s through FDR’s fourth term, the president and first lady used this extraordinarily powerful new medium to win elections, combat the Great Depression and rally the nation to fight fascism. Eleanor Roosevelt’s radio work is almost entirely forgotten. But she was a radio star in her own right — with commercial sponsors paying top dollar for her talents as a news commentator.

11/13/2014 -  Income inequality has been on the rise for decades. In the last 30 years, the wages of the top 1% have grown by 154%, while the bottom 90% has seen growth of only 17%. As the rungs of the economic ladder move further and further apart, conventional wisdom says that it will become much more difficult to climb them.

http://intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/past-debates/item/1159-income-inequality-impairs-the-american-dream

11/10/2014 - ISIS, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, aka Islamic State, is now the latest threat to our security. Or so our leaders tell us and the media repeat. It has seized territory in Syria and Iraq. The U.S. has been meddling in the Middle East non-stop for decades. What has it produced? Wars, militias, sectarianism and strife. And lots of oil and weapons sales. U.S. policy in the region is shrouded in propaganda about democracy and human rights while in practice Washington backs feudal regimes like Saudi Arabia. The U.S. is bombing ISIS in Syria and Iraq.

11/03/2014 - “Everyone is entitled to their opinion,” sums up most peoples’ understanding of the First Amendment. Many were dumbfounded when the Supreme Court ruled in favor of a conservative organization named Citizens United, in the case of Citizens United versus the Federal Election Commission (FEC). The 2010 ruling has further undermined democracy. Political campaigns are now flooded with dark money, untraceable funds that often determine the outcomes of ballot initiatives and elections.

10/27/2014 - Myths die hard. Just as there are no unicorns, there is no free market. The myth is propagandized by its beneficiaries, i.e., the rich and powerful, the 1%. The oft-repeated line is the market is some neutral entity which fosters competition and people benefit as prices come down. Reality is slightly different. We don’t have a really free market because there is massive government intervention to prop it up through bailouts and subsidies, tax breaks and loopholes. The system generates more and more monopoly and concentration.

10/20/2014 - Many people see the crisis posed by climate change clearly but governments, largely influenced by money coming from coal, oil and natural gas corporations, do not act. Huge demonstrations from New York to more than 150 cities all over the world indicate that people want action on climate change now. Germany is leading the way with solar technology. Prices are coming way down. China is investing more in renewable energy than the U.S. And in an extraordinary development, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund is divesting from fossil fuel companies.

10/30/2014 - On this Halloween special, the History Guys explore Americans' relationship with ghosts, spirits, and witches throughout our nation's history. Why were colonists so fearful of New England "witches"? How is it that progressive social reformers found a home in the Spiritualist movement of the 19th century? Why do new media technologies always conjure talk of the undead? Can social upheaval help explain our history with the ineffable?

Limits

Oct 11, 2014

10/18/14 -On this hour of Radiolab: a journey to the edge of human limits. How much can you jam into a human brain? How far can you push yourself past feelings of exhaustion? We test physical endurance with a bike race that makes the Tour de France look like child’s play, and mental capacity with a mind-stretching memory competition. And we ask if robots--for better or worse--may be forging beyond the limits of human understanding.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91709-limits/

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