Sue Ginn

Business Manager

Sue is a native Missoulian.  She has worked at the University of Montana for more than 15 years, 10 of them at Montana Public Radio.  

Ways To Connect

10/12/2014 - At the kickoff to Jazz At Lincoln Center’s 2014–15 Season, JALC celebrates Cuban music with a world-premiere commission featuring influential pianist, composer, and arranger Chucho Valdés and percussionist and vocalist Pedrito Martinez, as well as Wynton Marsalis with the Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra. Together, they blend jazz with the traditional folkloric music of Cuba and the Santeria religion.

10/13/2014 - Dominant paradigms, dominant stories, the big picture through which our lives move. How much of it is constructed for us? Most of it. What are the prevailing paradigms and cultural narratives really made of? Words. Language. To coin a phrase, define the terms, frame the issue, to write the story that sticks in the public mind and is constantly repeated, is the business of branding. Powerful institutions work day and night suppressing and spinning stories to legitimize their existence.

Space

Oct 3, 2014

10/04/2014 -In the 60’s, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91520-space/

10/06/2014 - Edward Snowden’s remarkable revelations leave no doubt. Big Brother is here. The National Security Agency’s PRISM program is a clandestine mass electronic surveillance and data mining system. In plain English: it enables state spying on citizens. The American Civil Liberties Union says, “The things we do and say online leave behind ever-growing trails of personal information. With every click, we entrust our conversations, emails, photos, and much more to Facebook, Microsoft, Google and Yahoo.

09/29/2014 - States have their iconic heroes. Founding Fathers. Jinnah in Pakistan, Ataturk in Turkey, George Washington in the U.S., Gandhi in India. To criticize them is risky business as they have been elevated to god-like status. Gandhi is no exception. He is revered and honored. His portrait hangs in many buildings and homes. His statue graces many public squares. And he is on the rupee note. The adulation extends outside of India. The British government recently announced that his statue would be placed in Parliament Square. But all people have cracks in their armor.

10/09/2014 - The global energy economy is undergoing tectonic shifts. America is poised to be an oil exporter - something unthinkable a decade ago - and severe weather and climate disruption are driving a push toward clean fuels. On the next Climate One, Host Greg Dalton talks with business leaders, scientists and authors about the path toward a prosperous and sustainable economy.  He will also talk about what is driving the droughts, floods and other freaky weather around the country.

10/08/2014 - KGLT general manager Ellen King-Rodgers visits with Pam Faerber, founder of www.bigbearstampede.org, a resource-packed website dedicated to raising awareness about depression, mental illness and suicide, recognizing the signs, and the path to doing something about it. Currently Pam is working on a program to be introduced to the Park County School District in Montana designed to recognize and address depression.

10/02/2014 - An Intelligence Squared Debate - In K-12 education, there is nothing more controversial than the Common Core State Standards, national academic standards in English and math. Adopted by more than 40 states, they were developed, in part, to address concerns that American students were falling behind their foreign counterparts. Has the federal government overreached and saddled our schools with standards that have been flawed from the start? The debaters are Carmel Martin, Carol Burris, Michael Petrill, and Frederick Hess.

09/25/2014 - An Intelligence Squared Debate – Is independent political speech the linchpin of our democracy or its Achilles' heel?   For democracy to work, some say, citizens (and corporations, and unions, and media outlets, and other voluntary organizations) must be allowed to express their views on the issues, candidates, and elections of the day. This proposition, they say, is exactly why the First Amendment protects the freedom of speech and of the press. On this view, restrictions on independent political speech undermine and subvert our constitutional structure.

09/27/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Die Frau ohne Schatten composed by Richard Strauss

3 hrs. 01 min.

http://www.wfmt.com/main.taf?p=1,1,41,46

Things

Sep 20, 2014

09/27/2014 - Important things, little things, personal things, things you can hold and things that can take hold of you.  This hour, investigations of the objects around us, their power to move us, and whether it's better to look back or more on, hold on tight, or just let go.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/things/

Laughter

Sep 19, 2014

09/20/2014 - We all laugh.  And you'll find that humor has very little to do with it.  We ask what makes us laugh? Along the way, we tickle some rats, listen in on a baby's first laugh, talk to a group of professional laughers, and travel to Tanzania to investigate an outbreak of contagious laughter.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91588-laughter/

Detective Stories

Sep 19, 2014

09/13/2014 - Forensics, archeology, genealogy, and genetics are devoted to figuring out what really happened.  In this hour, digging up the past leads to some very unexpected finds.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91516-detective-stories/

Cities

Sep 19, 2014

09/06/2014 - In this hour, we take to the street to ask what makes cities tick.  There's no scientific metric for measuring a city's personality.  But step out on the sidewalk, and you can see and feel it.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91732-cities/

The Barber of Seville

Sep 19, 2014

09/20/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents II Barbiere di Siviglia (in Italian) composed by Gioachino Rossini

2 hrs 44 mins

http://www.wfmt.com/main.taf?p=1,1,41,46

Peter Grimes (in English)

Sep 19, 2014

09/13/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Peter Grimes composed by Benjamin Britten

http://www.wfmt.com/main.taf?p=1,1,41,46

09/06/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Der Fliegende Hollander (in German) composed by Richard Wagner

http://www.wfmt.com/main.taf?p=1,1,41,46

Tosca (in Italian)

Sep 19, 2014

08/30/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Tosca composed by Giacomo Puccini

http://www.wfmt.com/main.taf?p=1,1,41,46

Mefistofele (in Italian)

Sep 19, 2014

08/23/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Mefistofele composed by Arrigo Boito

http://www.wfmt.com/main.taf?p=1,1,41,46

Ready to Work

Sep 18, 2014

09/18/2014 - Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is “college for all.” But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don’t require a bachelor’s degree. Many experts say it’s time to bring back career and technical education.

This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

The New Face of College

Sep 18, 2014

09/11/2014 - Just 20 percent of college-goers fit the stereotype of being young, single, full-time students who finish a degree in four years. College students today are more likely to be older, part-time, working, and low-income than they were three decades ago. Many are the first in their families to go to college.

This American RadioWorks documentary shows how universities are adapting to serve these new students. It explains changing demographics, and explores what colleges must do to remain engines of social mobility.

09/04/2014 - The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there’s plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards.

The Science of Smart

Sep 18, 2014

08/28/14 - Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

08/14/2014 - If consciousness is just the workings of neurons and synapses, how do we explain the phenomenon of near-death experience? By some accounts, about 3% of the U.S. population has had one: an out-of-body experience often characterized by remarkable visions and feelings of peace and joy, all while the physical body is close to death. To skeptics, there are more plausible, natural explanations, like oxygen deprivation. Is the prospect of an existence after death “real” and provable by science, or a construct of wishful thinking about our own mortality.

08/07/2014 -Americans, and especially Californians, have had a big dose of severe drought this year. Though it hit the state hard, farmers were the most effected. They continue to worry about the threat the water shortage poses to their multi-million dollar almond, kiwi and walnut crops. The answer has been to irrigate crops with water that is pumped up from underground stores. The problem is that so many farmers are digging so fast and pumping so much water, that the aquifer levels are in danger of depletion. That puts the agriculture industry ultimately at risk.

09/22/2014 - The Federal Bureau of Investigation has a long history of spying on African Americans including Nobel Prize winner Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The great writer Richard Wright, who was also snooped on, wrote the poem "The FB Eye Blues:" Woke up this morning/FB Eye under my bed/Said I woke up this morning /FB eye under my bed/Told me all I dreamed last night, every word I said. Racism and surveillance are closely intertwined. Today, state security agencies and police departments profile and target Muslims. Their organizations and mosques are infiltrated.

09/08/2014 - Large parts of the Middle East today are engulfed in violence. Why? What historical factors shape the current conflicts? Take Iraq for example, a country in chaos. The U.S. has been intervening in Iraq non-stop for decades. What has it produced? Sectarianism and strife. Death and destruction. Actual U.S. policy in the Middle East is buried in a blizzard of propaganda about democracy and human rights while in practice Washington backs feudal and repressive regimes like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain and the Emirates as well as dictatorships like Egypt. Justification for U.S.

Loops

Aug 23, 2014

08/30/2014 - Our lives are filled with loops that hurt us, heal us, make us laugh, and  sometimes leave us wanting more.  This hour, Radiolab investigates the strange things that emerge when something happens, then happens again, and again, and again, and again, and again, and...well, again.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/161744-loops/

Escape

Aug 16, 2014

08/23/2014 - The walls are closing in, you've got no way out...and then, suddenly, you escape!  This hour, stories about traps, getaways, perpetual cycles, and staggering breakthroughs.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/187571-escape/

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