Sue Ginn

Business Manager

Sue is a native Missoulian.  She has worked at the University of Montana for more than 15 years, 10 of them at Montana Public Radio.  

Ways To Connect


Dec 16, 2014

12/12/2014 - Once a kid is born, their genetic fate is pretty much sealed.  Or is it? This hour, we put nature and nurture on a collision course and discover how outside forces can find a way inside us, shaping not just our hearts and minds, but the basic biological blueprint that we pass on to future generations.

Where Am I?

Dec 16, 2014

12/05/2014 - How does your brain keep track of your body? This hour Radiolab tells stories of the mind-body link gone terribly wrong. We'll puzzle through the mysteries of missing limbs and hear about a novel treatment involving optical illusions.  Plus, the story of a butcher who suddenly lost his entire sense of touch, and we hear from pilots who suffer out-of-body experiences while flying fighter jets.


Dec 16, 2014

11/28/2014 - Stochasticity (a wonderfully slippery and smarty-pants word for randomness) may be at the very foundation of our lives.  To understand how big a role it plays, we look at chance and patterns in sports, lottery tickets, and even the cells in our own body.


Dec 16, 2014

11/21/2014 - What happens when there is no leader?  Starlings, bees, and ants manage just fine. In fact, they form staggeringly complicated societies - all without a Toscanini to conduct them into harmony.  This hour we ask how this happens.  We gaze down at the bottom-up logic of cities, Google, and even our very own brains with fire-flyologists, ant experts, neurologists, a mathematician, and an economist.


Dec 16, 2014

11/15/2014 - We live our lives at human speed, we experience and interact with the world on a human time scale.  But this hour, we put ourselves through the paces, peek inside a microsecond, and master the fastest thing in the universe.  We'll take a look at the longest running science experiment in history and team up with NPR's Planet Money to try to wrap our heads around the speed of high frequency trading.


Dec 16, 2014

11/08/2014 - Is it inevitable that even our most sacred natural landscapes will one day be swallowed up by humans?  This hour: the strange story of a small group of islands going through some very big changes, and just how far we're willing to go to stop their transformation.

War of the Worlds

Dec 16, 2014

11/01/2014 - On this hour, a deep dive into one of the most controversial moments in broadcasting history:  Orson Welles' 1938 radio play about Martians invading New Jersey, "The Ware of the Worlds."

Inner Voices

Dec 16, 2014

10/25/2014 - This hour we explore the voices inside our heads.  From a child forming his or her first thought to the nagging feeling that you're bound to fail, we'll delve into all the ways that the voices in our heads shape us, help us, and sometimes hurt us.  Along the way, tell the story of Mel Blanc, "the man of 1000 voices," and how one of those voices might have saved his life.

Hidden Kitchens World

Dec 11, 2014

12/14/2014 - The Kitchen Sisters and PRX present Hidden Kitchens World, a new hour of kitchen stories that travel the world. A broadcast special rich with great stories, music, sound, host and guest stars – Academy Award-winner Frances McDormand, Gael Garcia Bernal (star of Motorcycle Diaries and Jon Stewart’s new film, Rosewater), Werner Herzog, Salman Rushdie and Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

12/07/2014 - Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt were the “first couple” of American radio. From the 1920s through FDR’s fourth term, the president and first lady used this extraordinarily powerful new medium to win elections, combat the Great Depression and rally the nation to fight fascism. Eleanor Roosevelt’s radio work is almost entirely forgotten. But she was a radio star in her own right — with commercial sponsors paying top dollar for her talents as a news commentator.

11/13/2014 -  Income inequality has been on the rise for decades. In the last 30 years, the wages of the top 1% have grown by 154%, while the bottom 90% has seen growth of only 17%. As the rungs of the economic ladder move further and further apart, conventional wisdom says that it will become much more difficult to climb them.

11/10/2014 - ISIS, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, aka Islamic State, is now the latest threat to our security. Or so our leaders tell us and the media repeat. It has seized territory in Syria and Iraq. The U.S. has been meddling in the Middle East non-stop for decades. What has it produced? Wars, militias, sectarianism and strife. And lots of oil and weapons sales. U.S. policy in the region is shrouded in propaganda about democracy and human rights while in practice Washington backs feudal regimes like Saudi Arabia. The U.S. is bombing ISIS in Syria and Iraq.

11/03/2014 - “Everyone is entitled to their opinion,” sums up most peoples’ understanding of the First Amendment. Many were dumbfounded when the Supreme Court ruled in favor of a conservative organization named Citizens United, in the case of Citizens United versus the Federal Election Commission (FEC). The 2010 ruling has further undermined democracy. Political campaigns are now flooded with dark money, untraceable funds that often determine the outcomes of ballot initiatives and elections.

10/27/2014 - Myths die hard. Just as there are no unicorns, there is no free market. The myth is propagandized by its beneficiaries, i.e., the rich and powerful, the 1%. The oft-repeated line is the market is some neutral entity which fosters competition and people benefit as prices come down. Reality is slightly different. We don’t have a really free market because there is massive government intervention to prop it up through bailouts and subsidies, tax breaks and loopholes. The system generates more and more monopoly and concentration.

10/20/2014 - Many people see the crisis posed by climate change clearly but governments, largely influenced by money coming from coal, oil and natural gas corporations, do not act. Huge demonstrations from New York to more than 150 cities all over the world indicate that people want action on climate change now. Germany is leading the way with solar technology. Prices are coming way down. China is investing more in renewable energy than the U.S. And in an extraordinary development, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund is divesting from fossil fuel companies.

10/30/2014 - On this Halloween special, the History Guys explore Americans' relationship with ghosts, spirits, and witches throughout our nation's history. Why were colonists so fearful of New England "witches"? How is it that progressive social reformers found a home in the Spiritualist movement of the 19th century? Why do new media technologies always conjure talk of the undead? Can social upheaval help explain our history with the ineffable?


Oct 11, 2014

10/18/14 -On this hour of Radiolab: a journey to the edge of human limits. How much can you jam into a human brain? How far can you push yourself past feelings of exhaustion? We test physical endurance with a bike race that makes the Tour de France look like child’s play, and mental capacity with a mind-stretching memory competition. And we ask if robots--for better or worse--may be forging beyond the limits of human understanding.

10/12/2014 - At the kickoff to Jazz At Lincoln Center’s 2014–15 Season, JALC celebrates Cuban music with a world-premiere commission featuring influential pianist, composer, and arranger Chucho Valdés and percussionist and vocalist Pedrito Martinez, as well as Wynton Marsalis with the Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra. Together, they blend jazz with the traditional folkloric music of Cuba and the Santeria religion.

10/13/2014 - Dominant paradigms, dominant stories, the big picture through which our lives move. How much of it is constructed for us? Most of it. What are the prevailing paradigms and cultural narratives really made of? Words. Language. To coin a phrase, define the terms, frame the issue, to write the story that sticks in the public mind and is constantly repeated, is the business of branding. Powerful institutions work day and night suppressing and spinning stories to legitimize their existence.


Oct 3, 2014

10/04/2014 -In the 60’s, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are.

10/06/2014 - Edward Snowden’s remarkable revelations leave no doubt. Big Brother is here. The National Security Agency’s PRISM program is a clandestine mass electronic surveillance and data mining system. In plain English: it enables state spying on citizens. The American Civil Liberties Union says, “The things we do and say online leave behind ever-growing trails of personal information. With every click, we entrust our conversations, emails, photos, and much more to Facebook, Microsoft, Google and Yahoo.

09/29/2014 - States have their iconic heroes. Founding Fathers. Jinnah in Pakistan, Ataturk in Turkey, George Washington in the U.S., Gandhi in India. To criticize them is risky business as they have been elevated to god-like status. Gandhi is no exception. He is revered and honored. His portrait hangs in many buildings and homes. His statue graces many public squares. And he is on the rupee note. The adulation extends outside of India. The British government recently announced that his statue would be placed in Parliament Square. But all people have cracks in their armor.

10/09/2014 - The global energy economy is undergoing tectonic shifts. America is poised to be an oil exporter - something unthinkable a decade ago - and severe weather and climate disruption are driving a push toward clean fuels. On the next Climate One, Host Greg Dalton talks with business leaders, scientists and authors about the path toward a prosperous and sustainable economy.  He will also talk about what is driving the droughts, floods and other freaky weather around the country.

10/08/2014 - KGLT general manager Ellen King-Rodgers visits with Pam Faerber, founder of, a resource-packed website dedicated to raising awareness about depression, mental illness and suicide, recognizing the signs, and the path to doing something about it. Currently Pam is working on a program to be introduced to the Park County School District in Montana designed to recognize and address depression.

10/02/2014 - An Intelligence Squared Debate - In K-12 education, there is nothing more controversial than the Common Core State Standards, national academic standards in English and math. Adopted by more than 40 states, they were developed, in part, to address concerns that American students were falling behind their foreign counterparts. Has the federal government overreached and saddled our schools with standards that have been flawed from the start? The debaters are Carmel Martin, Carol Burris, Michael Petrill, and Frederick Hess.

09/25/2014 - An Intelligence Squared Debate – Is independent political speech the linchpin of our democracy or its Achilles' heel?   For democracy to work, some say, citizens (and corporations, and unions, and media outlets, and other voluntary organizations) must be allowed to express their views on the issues, candidates, and elections of the day. This proposition, they say, is exactly why the First Amendment protects the freedom of speech and of the press. On this view, restrictions on independent political speech undermine and subvert our constitutional structure.


Sep 20, 2014

09/27/2014 - Important things, little things, personal things, things you can hold and things that can take hold of you.  This hour, investigations of the objects around us, their power to move us, and whether it's better to look back or more on, hold on tight, or just let go.

09/27/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Die Frau ohne Schatten composed by Richard Strauss

3 hrs. 01 min.,1,41,46


Sep 19, 2014

09/20/2014 - We all laugh.  And you'll find that humor has very little to do with it.  We ask what makes us laugh? Along the way, we tickle some rats, listen in on a baby's first laugh, talk to a group of professional laughers, and travel to Tanzania to investigate an outbreak of contagious laughter.

Detective Stories

Sep 19, 2014

09/13/2014 - Forensics, archeology, genealogy, and genetics are devoted to figuring out what really happened.  In this hour, digging up the past leads to some very unexpected finds.