Sue Ginn

Business Manager

Sue is a native Missoulian.  She has worked at the University of Montana for more than 15 years, 10 of them at Montana Public Radio.  

Ways To Connect

09/06/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Der Fliegende Hollander (in German) composed by Richard Wagner,1,41,46

Tosca (in Italian)

Sep 19, 2014

08/30/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Tosca composed by Giacomo Puccini,1,41,46

Mefistofele (in Italian)

Sep 19, 2014

08/23/2014 - San Francisco Opera presents Mefistofele composed by Arrigo Boito,1,41,46

Ready to Work

Sep 18, 2014

09/18/2014 - Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is “college for all.” But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don’t require a bachelor’s degree. Many experts say it’s time to bring back career and technical education.

This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

The New Face of College

Sep 18, 2014

09/11/2014 - Just 20 percent of college-goers fit the stereotype of being young, single, full-time students who finish a degree in four years. College students today are more likely to be older, part-time, working, and low-income than they were three decades ago. Many are the first in their families to go to college.

This American RadioWorks documentary shows how universities are adapting to serve these new students. It explains changing demographics, and explores what colleges must do to remain engines of social mobility.

09/04/2014 - The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there’s plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards.

The Science of Smart

Sep 18, 2014

08/28/14 - Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

08/14/2014 - If consciousness is just the workings of neurons and synapses, how do we explain the phenomenon of near-death experience? By some accounts, about 3% of the U.S. population has had one: an out-of-body experience often characterized by remarkable visions and feelings of peace and joy, all while the physical body is close to death. To skeptics, there are more plausible, natural explanations, like oxygen deprivation. Is the prospect of an existence after death “real” and provable by science, or a construct of wishful thinking about our own mortality.

08/07/2014 -Americans, and especially Californians, have had a big dose of severe drought this year. Though it hit the state hard, farmers were the most effected. They continue to worry about the threat the water shortage poses to their multi-million dollar almond, kiwi and walnut crops. The answer has been to irrigate crops with water that is pumped up from underground stores. The problem is that so many farmers are digging so fast and pumping so much water, that the aquifer levels are in danger of depletion. That puts the agriculture industry ultimately at risk.

09/22/2014 - The Federal Bureau of Investigation has a long history of spying on African Americans including Nobel Prize winner Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The great writer Richard Wright, who was also snooped on, wrote the poem "The FB Eye Blues:" Woke up this morning/FB Eye under my bed/Said I woke up this morning /FB eye under my bed/Told me all I dreamed last night, every word I said. Racism and surveillance are closely intertwined. Today, state security agencies and police departments profile and target Muslims. Their organizations and mosques are infiltrated.

09/08/2014 - Large parts of the Middle East today are engulfed in violence. Why? What historical factors shape the current conflicts? Take Iraq for example, a country in chaos. The U.S. has been intervening in Iraq non-stop for decades. What has it produced? Sectarianism and strife. Death and destruction. Actual U.S. policy in the Middle East is buried in a blizzard of propaganda about democracy and human rights while in practice Washington backs feudal and repressive regimes like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain and the Emirates as well as dictatorships like Egypt. Justification for U.S.


Aug 23, 2014

08/30/2014 - Our lives are filled with loops that hurt us, heal us, make us laugh, and  sometimes leave us wanting more.  This hour, Radiolab investigates the strange things that emerge when something happens, then happens again, and again, and again, and again, and again, and...well, again.


Aug 16, 2014

08/23/2014 - The walls are closing in, you've got no way out...and then, suddenly, you escape!  This hour, stories about traps, getaways, perpetual cycles, and staggering breakthroughs.

60 Words

Aug 9, 2014

08/16/2014 - This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace.

08/16/2014 -

Thaïs                 Nino Machaidze
Athanaël            Plácido Domingo
Nicias                Paul Groves
Palemon            Valentin Anikin
Albine                Milena Kitic
Crobyle             Hae Ji Chang
Myrtale              Cassandra Zoé Velasco
Servant             Kihun Yoon

CONDUCTOR:  James Conlon
CHORUS:   LA Opera Chorus
CHORUS MASTER:  Grant Gershon


Aug 2, 2014

08/09/2014 - Chimps.  Bonobos.  Humans.  We're all great apes, but that doesn't mean we're one happy family.  This hour of Radiolab: stories of trying to live together.  Is this kind of cross-species co-habitation an utterly stupid idea?  Or might it be our one last hope as more and more humans fill up the planet?  A chimp named Lucy teaches us the ups and downs of growing up human and a visit to The Great Ape Trust in Des Moines, Iowa highlights some of the basics of bonobo culture (be careful, they bit).

08/09/2014 -

Lucia               Albina Shagimuratova
Edgardo           Saimir Pirgu
Enrico              Stephen Powell
Raimondo         James Creswell
Normanno         Joshua Guerrero
Alisa                 D'Ana Lombard
Arturo               Vladimir Dmitruk

CONDUCTOR:  James Conlon
CHORUS:   LA Opera Chorus
CHORUS MASTER:  Grant Gershon

Approx. Length:  2 hours 30 minutes

08/02/2014 -

Memory And Forgetting

Jul 26, 2014

08/02/2014 - This hour of Radiolab, a look behind the curtain of how memories are made...and forgotten.  Remembering is an unstable and profoundly unreliable process--it's easy come, easy go as we learn how true memories can be obliterated, and false ones added.  And Oliver Sacks joins us to tell the story of an amnesiac whose love for his wife and music transcend his 7-second memory.

0731/2014 - Is independent political speech the linchpin of our democracy or its Achilles' heel?   For democracy to work, some say, citizens (and corporations, and unions, and media outlets, and other voluntary organizations) must be allowed to express their views on the issues, candidates, and elections of the day. This proposition, they say, is exactly why the First Amendment protects the freedom of speech and of the press. On this view, restrictions on independent political speech undermine and subvert our constitutional structure.

07/30/2014 - A record 175,000 people from all over the world traveled to Butte for the Montana Folk Festival in 2014. In it's fourth year, the 'Richest Hill on Earth' not only hosted a slew of internationally renowned musicians and visual artists, but unfurled its "Culture of the Car" celebration, demonstrating that folk art thrives everywhere. On the stage, the canvas, even the hood of a station wagon.

07/28/2014 - When it comes to climate change the operative word is “hot” with “record” and "unprecedented" closely following. UN conferences on climate do little beyond the powerful issuing grandiose proclamations about how green they are and then it’s back to their destructive policies. The Guardian, captures the hypocrisy,  “governments turned their backs on the living planet, demonstrating that no chronic problem, however grave, will take priority.” Rome is burning.

07/21/2014 - Imagine a gigantic vacuum cleaner scooping up all electronic communications. That’s what the National Security Agency does. Think you are safe from NSA snooping? That you can hide behind clever passwords? Think again. The Agency has the capability to generate one billion password guesses per second. On top of that it can remotely activate your cell phone and computer and use them as eavesdropping and tracking devices. The NSA is at the center of a system of monitoring and control beyond the wildest dreams of the greatest tyrants in history.

Who Am I?

Jul 21, 2014

07/26/2014 -The "mind" and "self" were formerly the domain of philosophers and priests. But in this hour of Radiolab, neurologists lead the charge on profound questions like "How does the brain make me?"

We stare into the mirror with Dr. Julian Keenan, reflect on the illusion of selfhood with British neurologist Paul Broks, and contemplate the evolution of consciousness with Dr. V. S. Ramachandran. Also: the story of woman who one day woke up as a completely different person.


Jul 21, 2014

07/19/2014 - It's almost impossible to imagine a world without words.  But this hour, we try to do just that.  We meet a woman who taught a 27-year-old man the first words of his life, hear a firsthand account of what it feels like to have the language center of your brain wiped out by a stroke, and retrace the birth of a brand new language 30 years ago.


Jul 21, 2014

07/12/2014 - Where does our sense of right and wrong come from?  We watch chimps at a primate research center sharing blackberries, observe 3-year-olds fighting over toys, and tour Eastern State Penitentiary--the country's first penitentiary. Plus, a story of land grabbing, indentured servitude, and slumlording in the fourth grade.

07/05/2014 - More often than not, a fight is just a fight...Someone wins, someone loses.  But this hour, we have a series of face-offs that shine a light on the human condition, the benefit of coming at something from a different side, and the price of being right.

07/19/2014 -

Carmen           Patricia Bardon
Don José         Brandon Jovanovich
Micaëla            Pretty Yende
Escamillo         Ildebrando D'Arcangelo
Zuniga            Valentin Anikin
Moralès           Daniel Armstrong
Frasquita         Hae Ji Chang
Mercédès         Cassandra Zoé Velasco
El Remendado  Keith Jameson
El Dancaïre      Museop Kim
A Vendor         Melissa Treinkman
A Gypsy          Abdiel Gonzalez
A Soldier         Steven Pence