Sue Ginn

Business Manager

Sue is a native Missoulian.  She has worked at the University of Montana for more than 15 years, 10 of them at Montana Public Radio.  

Ways To Connect

05/15/2014 - Why Does Music Move Us? Music exists in every culture. Does that mean it offers an evolutionary advantage? What drives humans to make music? And why does music get so deeply embedded into our lives? We’ll delve deeper into what music can teach us about the human brain – with musicians and researchers including:

Blame

May 2, 2014

05/03/2014 - We've all felt it, that irresistible urge to point the finger. But new technologies are complicating age-old moral conundrums about accountability. This hour, we ask what blame does for us -- why do we need it, when isn't it enough, and what happens when we try to push past it with forgiveness and mercy?

http://www.radiolab.org/story/317421-blame/

05/08/2014 - Why Do We Share?

Are humans basically selfish, or basically giving? There’s a widespread assumption that you have to offer people incentives to do good deeds and threaten punishment to stop them from doing evil deeds. But the way people act in the real world contradicts that idea. Humans may actually have been shaped by evolution to care about each other, to share, and to cooperate. In this program, we hear from a fascinating cast of characters:

5/5/2014 - If you’d ask most people, they’d rather stay at home and watch a Seinfeld rerun than go to a poetry reading. Yet almost imperceptibly poetry enriches our lives and generates cultural growth and change. Think about it. Add up all the myriad poetry-related activities: readings, workshops, symposia, retreats, undergraduate and MFA programs at universities, books, zines, websites, spoken word recordings, then throw in lyric writing for theater and the multi-billion dollar music industry.

04/14/2014 - This one hour On The Strip Radio Special produced by Ben Manilla takes listeners through a history of this enduring art form from its beginnings up to today.   Through an engaging narrative, host Dianne Nicolini of KFDC and renowned conductor Robert Ziegler tell the story of classical music from Gregorian chants to today's minimalism, highlighting innovations and developments and profiling the lives and works of groundbreaking composers.

05/01/2014 - What is this thing called love?

This program ponders the “why” behind humans’ drive to pair up. Why do human beings feel romantic love? What happens to the brains of people who are in love? How can scientifically studying love help us navigate our relationships? A fascinating cast of characters tackles these questions head-on: 

04/24/2014 - Affirmative action, when used as a factor in college admissions, is meant to foster diversity and provide equal opportunities in education for under represented minorities. But is it achieving its stated goals and helping the population it was created to support? Its critics point to students struggling to keep up in schools mismatched to their abilities and to the fact that the policy can be manipulated to benefit affluent and middle class students who already possess many educational advantages. Is it time to overhaul or abolish affirmative action?  

Race

Apr 24, 2014

04/19/2014 - When the human genome was first fully mapped in 2000, Bill Clinton, Craig Venter, and Francis Collins took the stage and pronounced that "The concept of race has no genetic or scientific base." Great words spoken with great intentions. But what do they really mean, and where do they leave us? Our genes are nearly all the same, but that hasn't made race meaningless, or wiped out our evolving conversation about it.  This hour of Radiolab a look at race.

Dollarocracy

Apr 24, 2014

04/28/2014 - Dollarocracy: a system of government where private wealth determines political outcomes. Sound at all familiar? The corruption bred by boatloads of cash contaminates and pollutes our entire political process. So-called reforms won’t cure the ailment. Radical surgery is required. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. understood this well when he counseled, “Timid supplications for justice will not solve the problem. We’ve got to massively confront the power structure.” Washington is Lobbystan. The thousands of influence peddlars pretty much get what they want for their paymasters.

04/21/2014 - When faced with injustice what options are open to people? Turn away and ignore it or confront it? The destruction of the environment is an injustice. We are turning parts of the Earth into a toxic waste dump. What comforts are we willing to give up to protect Mother Nature? Will we make real sacrifices or simply kick the ball down the road and be content with placebos like shopping differently? The planet is facing a medical emergency. In response, activists are sitting in, chaining themselves to fences and blocking roads.

04/30/2014 - We continue the celebration of Poetry Month with a tribute to Maxine Kumin, who died on February 6, 2014 at the age of 88. A former Consultant in Poetry to Library of Congress (now known as the US Poet Laureate), Kumin is heralded for her poetry and her dedication to feminism.

04/14/2014 - A steady stream of reports on the deterioration of the environment is issued. There is a brief flurry of media coverage. The corporate-funded climate change deniers make counter claims. We wake briefly to the crisis then most of us lapse into a couch potato stupor. Neoliberal dogma and an almost mystical belief in capitalism makes almost certain that little will be done to avert coming calamities. Charades called climate summits offer nothing more than photo ops of smiling world leaders and vacuous press releases. We blithely turn our heads away from reality.

Adapting to Climate Change

Apr 10, 2014

04/17/2014 -No matter what you believe about climate change, we can all agree that extreme weather events -- tornadoes, hurri canes, fires, droughts -- are occurring more frequently. These massive natural disasters upset lives and devastate property.  The costs of clean-up and reconstruction are enormous. 

 

04/10/2014 - There are questions we would answer, if only we were asked.  How did we grow up?  What do we remember about home?  What about our family?

celebrate the first decade of StoryCorps, with a special retrospective hosted by NPR’s Scott Simon and StoryCorps founder Dave Isay.

http://storycorps.org/

MTPR Special Shorts

Mar 31, 2014

04/10/2014 - The best of short form public radio

The Best of Sally Mauk

Mar 31, 2014

04/09/2014 - Highlights of some great interviews from the MTPR News Director

Selected Shorts Special

Mar 31, 2014

04/08/2014 - Jane Curtin hosts a program with three uncanny stories:  The Sixth Borough, by Jonathan Safran Foer, read by Jerry Zaks, The Occasional Garden, by Saki, read by Daniel Gerroll, and The Palmist by Andrew Lam, read by James Naughton.

04/07/13 - excerpts from David Barsamian's exclusive interview with Noam Chomsky

Puccini's La Bohème

Mar 29, 2014

04/05/2014 - Approximate running time 2 hrs. 55 min.

Puccini’s moving story of young love is the most performed opera in Met history—and with good reason. Anita Hartig and Barbara Frittoli star as the frail Mimì in Franco Zeffirelli’s classic production, with Vittorio Grigolo in the role of her passionate lover, Rodolfo.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/opera/boheme-puccini-tickets

The Soul Patch

Mar 29, 2014

04/05/2014 - In this episode, stories of unlikely and surprisingly simple answers to seemingly unsolvable problems.  We get to know a man who struggles, and mostly fails to contain his violent outbursts...until he meets a bird who can keep in in check.  Then, Oliver Sacks and Chuck Close, who are both face-blind, share workarounds that help them figure out who they're talking to.  Ana senior center stumbles upon an unexpected way to help Alzheimer's patients - by building a bus stop.

Songwriters Summit

Mar 24, 2014

03/31/2014 - Guy Clark, Joe Ely, John Hiatt, and Lyle Lovett are four singer-songwriters who straddle folk and country music.  On this program, they share some of their favorite new songs and old standards, slipping in a few tributes to the city of Los Angeles, home to the Disney Concert Hall.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/17663-songwriter-s-summit-with-lyle-lovett

Bryan Stevenson

Mar 24, 2014

03/31/2014 - Justice for Some - In her bestselling book, The New Jim Crow, Michelle Alexander says, the huge number of people behind bars in the U.S.

Bellini's La Sonnambula

Mar 24, 2014

03/29/2014 - Approximate running time 2 hrs. 45 min.

Diana Damrau stars as Amina opposite bel canto specialist Javier Camarena as Elvino in Mary Zimmerman’s intriguing staging of Bellini’s sweet love story, with its unforgettable sleepwalking aria for the heroine. Marco Armiliato conducts.

Reviews
A "smashing revival... Damrau is a marvel... She makes the most difficult passages sound effortless... Her pianissimo notes, barely above a whisper, go straight to the heart." (Huffington Post)

Berg's Wozzeck

Mar 24, 2014

03/22/2014 - Approximate running time 1 hrs. 37 min.

Wozzeck’s longtime champion James Levine conducts Berg’s gripping score of passion, despair, and murder. Deborah Voigt and Thomas Hampson step into the demanding roles of Marie and the hapless title character for the first time in their remarkable careers.

Max Blumenthall

Mar 24, 2014

03/24/2014 - Israel: Siege Mentality - From Kissinger to Kerry, U.S. Secretaries of State engage in endless rounds of shuttle diplomacy. They issue rosy statements about progress and breakthroughs. But little changes. Israeli policy has created concrete facts on the ground. Settlement building on Palestinian land, illegal under international law, has expanded over decades. Some 500,000 Israelis live in settlements from Ariel to Ma’ale Adumim.

Dinopocalypse

Mar 24, 2014

03/29/2014 - We all know what happened to the dinosaurs, right? Well, at least we thought we did.  IN this episode Radiolab runs the clock back 66 million years to tell a story of cataclysmic destruction and surprising survival.  Along the way, we get to meet our great, great, great, great, great (etc!) grandmother and a few other surprise guests.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/dinopocalypse/

Pop Music

Mar 24, 2014

03/22/2014 - This hour of Radiolab: pop music's pull.  Some songs have the nefarious power to stick mercilessly in our heads, and some songs have the transcendent allure to overcome cultural differences.  We ask how songwriters create these songs seemingly out of the ether, listen in on the music of a deaf man hears, and examine the timeless appeal of the Elvis of Afghanistan

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91629-pop-music/

03/27/2014 - "Does the president have the constitutional power to target and kill U.S. citizens abroad?"  With the drone strike on accused terrorist and New Mexico-born Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen, President Obama has tested the limits of the executive branch's powers.  Does the president have constitutional authority under the due process clause to kill U.S.

03/24/14 - Enjoy music from Shape Shifter, Carlos Santana's CD dedicated to North American Indian Nations, music from Sugar Man as well as Wayquay, the Neville Brothers, Richie Havens, The Chamber Brothers, Tha Tribe, and many others.

Living on Earth Extra

Mar 19, 2014

03/19/2014 - Fukishima Nuclear Meltdown Three Years Later  - In 2011 a tsunami caused the meltdown of three nuclear reactors in Fukushima, Japan. Since then workers have stabilized the reactors but large amounts of leaking radioactive water is still a problem.

Navy Rescuers Claim Radiation Sickness - US military personnel aboard Navy ships involved in the Fukushima relief effort are suing the Tokyo Electric Power Company over illnesses they say were caused by exposure to radioactive plumes from the reactor fires during the meltdowns.

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