Sue Ginn

Business Manager

Sue is a native Missoulian.  She has worked at the University of Montana for more than 15 years, 10 of them at Montana Public Radio.  

Ways To Connect

06/05/2014 - Is the college of the future online? With the popularity of MOOCs (massive open online courses) and the availability of online degree programs at a fraction of their on-campus price, we are experiencing an exciting experiment in higher education. Does the traditional classroom stand a chance? Will online education be the great equalizer, or is a campus-based college experience still necessary? The debaters are Anant Agarwal, Jonathan Cole, Ben Nelson, and Rebecca Schuman.

06/11/14 - A Father's Day Special, a classic mix of memorable music, clips, and interviews with Dad

http://www.prx.org/pieces/18545-father-s-favorite-shortcut

Black Box

May 24, 2014

05/31/2014 - This hour, we examine three very different kinds of black boxes—those peculiar spaces where it’s clear what’s going in, we know what’s coming out, but what happens in-between is a mystery. From the darkest parts of metamorphosis, to a sixty year-old secret among magicians, to the nature of consciousness itself, we confront the stubborn gaps in our understanding.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/black-box/

Wagner's "Parsifal"

May 24, 2014

05/31/2014 - Approximately 4 hours, 45 minutes - in German, composed by Richard Wagner

http://schedule.wfmt.com/?day=05/17/2014&hs=0&he=23

Puccini's Madama Butterfly

May 22, 2014

05/24/2014 - Approximately 3 hours - in Italian, composed by Giacomo Puccini - Libretto by: Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica, after the short story by John Luther Long and the play by David Belasco

http://schedule.wfmt.com/?day=05/17/2014&hs=0&he=23

Verdi's "Otello"

May 22, 2014

05/17/2014 - Approximately 3 hours - In Italian, Composed by Giuseppe Verdi - Libretto by:  Arrigo Boito, after William Shakespeare's tragedy

http://schedule.wfmt.com/?day=05/17/2014&hs=0&he=23

Rossini's "La Cenerentola"

May 22, 2014

05/10/2014 - Approximate running time 3 hrs. 15 min.

Three peerless Rossini virtuosos star in La Cenerentola—a vocal tour de force for mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato, singing her first Met performances of the Cinderella title role, and tenors Juan Diego Flórez and Javier Camarena, who share the role of her Prince Charming. Alessandro Corbelli and Luca Pisaroni complete the cast, with Met Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi leading the effervescent score.

Bellini's "I Puritani"

May 22, 2014

05/03/2014 - Approximate running time 3 hrs. 20 min.

An exciting newcomer joins three acclaimed bel canto stars in Bellini’s final opera, a vocal showcase that features one of opera’s greatest mad scenes. Olga Peretyatko makes her highly anticipated Met debut as Elvira, the young woman driven to madness, opposite Lawrence Brownlee, Mariusz Kwiecien, and Michele Pertusi.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/opera/i-puritani-bellini-tickets.aspx

Mozart's "Cosi Fan Tutte"

May 22, 2014

04/26/2014 - Approximate running time 3 hrs. 40 min.

Music Director James Levine conducts Mozart’s beloved opera about testing the ties of love. The cast is filled with youthful Met stars: Guanqun Yu and Isabel Leonard are the sisters Fiordiligi and Dorabella, Matthew Polenzani and Rodion Pogossov are their lovers, with Danielle de Niese as the scheming Despina.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/metopera/search/index.aspx?q=cosi

Strauss's "Arabella"

May 22, 2014

04/19/2014 - Approximate running time 3 hrs. 31 min.

Swedish soprano Malin Byström stars in the title role of Strauss’s nostalgic romance that explores the fleeting charms of youth, opposite Michael Volle and Juliane Banse. Philippe Auguin conducts.

In the title role, Malin Byström, "elegant in both looks and tone, and sounding full and flexible, is uncannily reminiscent of Kiri Te Kanawa... her voice has silvery plush..."

04/12/2014 - Approximate running time 3 hrs. 5 min.

After their powerful pairing in Il Trovatore, Marcelo Álvarez and Patricia Racette reunite in Giordano’s melodramatic story of life in times of revolutionary fervor, a passionate tale of the ill-fated love of a dashing poet and an aristocratic lady, set against the backdrop of the French Revolution.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/opera/andrea-chenier-giordano-tickets.aspx

Deception

May 22, 2014

05/24/2014 -Lies, liars, and lie catchers. This hour of Radiolab asks if it's possible for anyone to lead a life without deception. We consult a cast of characters, from pathological liars to lying snakes to drunken psychiatrists, to try and understand the strange power of lying to yourself and others.

http://www.radiolab.org/story/91612-deception/

Oop

May 22, 2014

05/17/2014 -Oops. In this hour of Radiolab, stories of unintended consequences.

You come up with a great idea. You devise a plan. You control for every imaginable variable. And once everything’s in place, the train hops your carefully laid tracks. In this episode, one psychologist's zeal to safeguard national security may have created a terrorist, while one community's efforts to protect an endangered bird had deadly consequences. And against all odds, a toxic lake spawns new life.

05/19/2014 - Are sports simply a form of entertainment or is there some deeper meaning off the field we are not seeing? From ancient Greece to modern times, sports have always been a big attraction. But in the cable and digital age it is bigger and more lucrative than ever. Sports encompass the world. From soccer in Latin America to cricket in India to hockey in Canada, millions of people are energized by and care about their teams and players. Heroes rise and fall. Tiger Woods, Brett Favre, Lance Armstrong. There are sex scandals, doping, and murder trials.

Monumental Disagreements

May 19, 2014

05/26/2014 - This is a country awash in monuments. They adorn traffic circles, street corners and, of course, the National Mall. In this special Memorial Day episode of BackStory, the American History Guys explore the idea of national remembrance. What or whom have Americans chosen to memorialize? And what do these choices say about us?

http://www.prx.org/pieces/97429-monumental-disagreements-rebroadcast

05/22/2014 - What is a good death?

Most people hope to die quickly, or go quietly at home, surrounded by family. But most of us won’t die that way. More often, we die in intensive care. Perhaps fear keeps us from the good death we wish for. In this program, we hear from people seeking to bring engagement with death back into our culture, through death salons, green funerals, and meaningful end-of-life care.

http://www2.pri.org/infosite/networknews/trbq.cfm

05/12/2014 - When the U.S. goes to war, private contractors salivate. When it comes to making money, there is no business like war business. Control or oversight? Not much. There is a feeding frenzy at the troughs of public money accompanied by the almost inevitable cost overruns, waste, fraud and theft. The corruption is fueled by the revolving door syndrome between corporations and the Pentagon. Almost seamlessly, today’s assistant secretary of defense becomes tomorrow’s vice-president of Raytheon.

05/10/2014 - This hour we explore perhaps the most iconic Patient Zero of all time: Typhoid Mary; dive into the molecular detective story to pinpoint the beginning of the AIDS epidemic; ask whether you can trace the spread of an idea and in the end, we find ourselves faced with a choice between competing claims about the origin of the high five.

http://www.radiolab.org/search/?q=patient+zero#q=patient%20zero

05/15/2014 - Why Does Music Move Us? Music exists in every culture. Does that mean it offers an evolutionary advantage? What drives humans to make music? And why does music get so deeply embedded into our lives? We’ll delve deeper into what music can teach us about the human brain – with musicians and researchers including:

Blame

May 2, 2014

05/03/2014 - We've all felt it, that irresistible urge to point the finger. But new technologies are complicating age-old moral conundrums about accountability. This hour, we ask what blame does for us -- why do we need it, when isn't it enough, and what happens when we try to push past it with forgiveness and mercy?

http://www.radiolab.org/story/317421-blame/

05/08/2014 - Why Do We Share?

Are humans basically selfish, or basically giving? There’s a widespread assumption that you have to offer people incentives to do good deeds and threaten punishment to stop them from doing evil deeds. But the way people act in the real world contradicts that idea. Humans may actually have been shaped by evolution to care about each other, to share, and to cooperate. In this program, we hear from a fascinating cast of characters:

5/5/2014 - If you’d ask most people, they’d rather stay at home and watch a Seinfeld rerun than go to a poetry reading. Yet almost imperceptibly poetry enriches our lives and generates cultural growth and change. Think about it. Add up all the myriad poetry-related activities: readings, workshops, symposia, retreats, undergraduate and MFA programs at universities, books, zines, websites, spoken word recordings, then throw in lyric writing for theater and the multi-billion dollar music industry.

04/14/2014 - This one hour On The Strip Radio Special produced by Ben Manilla takes listeners through a history of this enduring art form from its beginnings up to today.   Through an engaging narrative, host Dianne Nicolini of KFDC and renowned conductor Robert Ziegler tell the story of classical music from Gregorian chants to today's minimalism, highlighting innovations and developments and profiling the lives and works of groundbreaking composers.

05/01/2014 - What is this thing called love?

This program ponders the “why” behind humans’ drive to pair up. Why do human beings feel romantic love? What happens to the brains of people who are in love? How can scientifically studying love help us navigate our relationships? A fascinating cast of characters tackles these questions head-on: 

04/24/2014 - Affirmative action, when used as a factor in college admissions, is meant to foster diversity and provide equal opportunities in education for under represented minorities. But is it achieving its stated goals and helping the population it was created to support? Its critics point to students struggling to keep up in schools mismatched to their abilities and to the fact that the policy can be manipulated to benefit affluent and middle class students who already possess many educational advantages. Is it time to overhaul or abolish affirmative action?  

Race

Apr 24, 2014

04/19/2014 - When the human genome was first fully mapped in 2000, Bill Clinton, Craig Venter, and Francis Collins took the stage and pronounced that "The concept of race has no genetic or scientific base." Great words spoken with great intentions. But what do they really mean, and where do they leave us? Our genes are nearly all the same, but that hasn't made race meaningless, or wiped out our evolving conversation about it.  This hour of Radiolab a look at race.

Dollarocracy

Apr 24, 2014

04/28/2014 - Dollarocracy: a system of government where private wealth determines political outcomes. Sound at all familiar? The corruption bred by boatloads of cash contaminates and pollutes our entire political process. So-called reforms won’t cure the ailment. Radical surgery is required. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. understood this well when he counseled, “Timid supplications for justice will not solve the problem. We’ve got to massively confront the power structure.” Washington is Lobbystan. The thousands of influence peddlars pretty much get what they want for their paymasters.

04/21/2014 - When faced with injustice what options are open to people? Turn away and ignore it or confront it? The destruction of the environment is an injustice. We are turning parts of the Earth into a toxic waste dump. What comforts are we willing to give up to protect Mother Nature? Will we make real sacrifices or simply kick the ball down the road and be content with placebos like shopping differently? The planet is facing a medical emergency. In response, activists are sitting in, chaining themselves to fences and blocking roads.

04/30/2014 - We continue the celebration of Poetry Month with a tribute to Maxine Kumin, who died on February 6, 2014 at the age of 88. A former Consultant in Poetry to Library of Congress (now known as the US Poet Laureate), Kumin is heralded for her poetry and her dedication to feminism.

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