Sue Ginn

Business Manager

Sue is a native Missoulian.  She has worked at the University of Montana for more than 15 years, 10 of them at Montana Public Radio.  

Ways To Connect

2/19/2014 - This week on Mountain West Voices: Conrad Little Leaf talks about the Blackfoot experience on both sides of the U.S. - Canada border, about cultural and linguistic continuity, and the fight against assimilation.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/111482-nobody-can-move-you-keeping-blackfoot-language-an

2/20/2014 - During a month selected to celebrate “history,” we certainly are treated to a lot of the same familiar stories: the battles won for Civil Rights, the glory of Martin Luther King Jr.’s words, the hardships endured by slaves. And as important as those narratives are for us to collectively remember, many others get lost in trumpeting the same heroic tales. In this hour, State of the Re:Union zeroes in some of those alternate narratives, ones edited out of the mainstream imagining of Black History, deconstructing the popular perception of certain celebrated moments.

The Last Leaf

Feb 12, 2014

 

02/12/2014 - 99-year-old Bonnie Preikszas shares stories of life as a rural Montana schoolteacher in the 1930's.

https://www.prx.org/pieces/92256-the-last-leaf

2/19/2014 - Join us for an in-depth interview with Unreal Candy founders Michael and Nicky Bronner as we discuss their quest around the globe to find chefs to “Unjunk the world.” The intiative to question the standards of candy shelf life and how celebrities such as Matt Damon, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Tom Brady all got involved in the cause.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/103457-unreal-candy

Sperm

Feb 9, 2014

2/15/2014 - Matthew Cobb takes us back to 1677, when Anton Van Leewenhoek first identified sperm and there was much talk of souls and miniature men residing in the seminal fluid. Upon observation it became clear that there were an awful lot of those little guys that never turned into babies! Jad wonders: why so many sperm?

2/13/2014 - The History Guys explore three centuries of pre-marital intimacy.  Did economic considerations used to play a greater role in coupling? In what ways have dating practices challenged class and racial boundaries?  Has the idea of "romance" itself morphed over time?  Considering the stereotypes about Puritan New England, you might be surprised to learn that sweethearts in the 18th century were no only allowed to sleep together before marriage - they were encouraged!  The catch?

2/12/2014 - This is a story she did for This American Life and it won the Gold Prize at the Third Coast Audio Festival, which was incredibly exciting.  She learned how to write a break-up song to get over her break-up.  The story is about heartbreak and wallowing and sadness and how songs make you stay sad, but in a good way.  I hope you like it.

http://www.prx.org/search/pieces?q=Starlee+Kine&x=13&y=1

James Davenport

Feb 5, 2014

2/11 & 12/2014 - James reflects on the pros and cons of not "getting" pop-culture references.  He pairs his thoughts with a passage by John Steinbeck.

2/10/2014 - The Olympics are perhaps the crown jewels of sports. The pomp and circumstance, the pageantry and international competition make the games special. They began over 2,700 years ago in Olympia, Greece. They were held in honor of Zeus, king of the gods. Today, the gods are fame, fortune, and national pride. The Olympics are a multi-billion dollar extravaganza. Behind the spectacle of athletic prowess and the patina of global harmony, brass-knuckle politics and brute economics reign.

Dvořák's Rusalka

Feb 5, 2014

2/8/2014 - Approximate running time: 4:00

The great Renée Fleming returns to one of her signature roles, singing the enchanting “Song to the Moon” in Dvorák’s soulful fairy-tale opera. Tenor Piotr Beczala co-stars as the Prince, Dolora Zajick is Ježibaba, and dynamic young maestro Yannick Nézet-Séguin is on the podium.

http://www.metoperafamily.org//metopera/liveinhd/LiveinHD.aspx?icamp=hd&iloc=

Fate and Fortune

Feb 5, 2014

2/8/2014 -This hour, we question what decides the trajectory of our lives -- individual force of will, or fate?

If destiny isn't written in the stars, could it be written in our genes? Kids struggle to resist marshmallows, and their ability to holdout at age 4 turns out to predict how successful they're likely to be the rest of their lives. And an unexpected find in a convent archive uncovers early warning signs for dementia in the writings of 18-year-olds.

2/5/2014 - Linh Huynh came to Canada as a child with the exodus of the 'boat people' from Vietnam. Today, she helps Calgary's new immigrants, teaching them English, and helping them adapt to their adopted country while preserving their own cultures.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/110522-full-circle-a-refugee-teaches-english-to-immigran

2/10/2014 - Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word.  But he was a music lover too and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians.  Hosted Terrance McKnight, WQXR host and former Morehouse professor of music, I Too, Sing America will dive into the songs, cantatas, musicals, and librettos that flowed from Hughes' pen.  As he did with his poetry, Hughes used m

2/6/2014 - Among the most iconic landscapes in America is the Western Range, a stretch of millions of acres of land, much of it remote and undeveloped.  Deep traditions tie people to this land.  But in the 21st century, it is also contested ground.  Development pressures threaten open space as the Sun Belt becomes an economic powerhouse.  Border issues mean life in some of these rural places has been transformed by violence and politics.  But new ways are being forged on these fronts, ways that involve collaboration, innovation, and the rediscovery and re-imagining of history on...the new S

2/5/2014 - After meeting at Cave Canem, the black writers' symposium, John Murillo, Dwayne Betts, Randall Horton, and Marcus Jackson discovered they all had a shared love of the late African-American poet Etheridge Knight.  The four bonded, kept in touch, and formed their own poetry collective called "The Symphony."  Each poet of the collective reads from his own work and discusses writing from the perspective of the African-American male experience.

02/03/2014 - What’s in a seed? Life itself. Ten thousand years ago, Iraq, Egypt and India were the sites of the earliest sowing and harvesting of plants that had previously been gathered in the wild. It was a revolutionary development and made civilization possible. Since then humans have been able to grow food and feed themselves. Today, that freedom embodied in seeds is threatened. Multinational corporations, like Monsanto, have radically changed the agricultural landscape.

2/1/2014 -Madama Butterfly - 

Approximate running time 3 hrs. 15 min.

Anthony Minghella’s breathtakingly beautiful and powerfully dramatic production returns, with Amanda Echalaz making her Met debut as Cio-Cio-San. Rising tenor Bryan Hymel sings Pinkerton. Philippe Auguin, Marco Armiliato, and Fabio Luisi share conducting duties.

Madama Butterfly is a co-production of the Metropolitan Opera, English National Opera, and the Lithuanian National Opera.

1/25/2014 - Approximate running time 2 hrs. 41 min.

Anna Netrebko reprises her adorable Adina in Bartlett Sher’s charming production of Donizetti’s tender comedy, sharing the role with Andriana Chuchman in her Met debut. Ramón Vargas is the love-struck Nemorino, and Erwin Schrott sings the likeable quack Dulcamara, whose “magic” potion causes as many problems
as it solves.

http://www.metoperafamily.org/metopera/index.aspx?

1/30/2014 - Intelligence Squared US presents - With the disastrous launch of the HealthCare.gov website, critics of the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare,” were given more fuel for the fire. Is this political hot potato's inevitability once again at stake? And is the medical community really on board with the law, or resisting (rewriting?) it from the sidelines?

http://intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/past-debates/item/1016-obamacare-is-now-beyond-rescue

1/29/2014 - Aaberg's Music and The River

http://ofthewest.net/

1/29/2014 - As a child on the Crow Reservation in Montana, Peggy White Wellknown Buffalo was taken from her home and sent to Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding schools out of state, and forbidden from speaking her language. As an adult, she has dedicated her life to helping Crow children connect with their history, their culture and their place.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/78464-the-one-who-takes-care-of-children#description

1/22/2014 - Don Schonenbeck shares his perspective on a lifetime of wandering, and on the circumstances that led to his homelessness.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/109755-i-ain-t-leavin-my-road-dog-a-montana-man-s-perspe

On The Marsh

Jan 29, 2014

1/15/2014 - On a visit home during the last week of waterfowl season, a man and his father head for the marsh where they have spent thousands of hours; hiding in the cattails, waiting for ducks to come to their hand-carved decoys, and talking about the nature of hunting, and the nature of home.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/72532-on-the-marsh

1/8/2014 - Diane Carlson Evans was a U.S. Army Nurse during the Vietnam War. She survived indescribable trauma, felt resented when she returned to the U.S., and kept her bitterness and her tears inside for many years. Then she founded the Vietnam Women's Memorial Project, and helped hundreds of women vets tell their stories of Vietnam.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/108683-crying-for-eddie-a-vietnam-war-nurse-tells-her-st

12/18/2014 - A visit with Paul Williams in Helena, Montana - a guitar maker, woodworker, and homeless Vietnam veteran.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/107867-a-lot-to-give-a-homeless-viet-nam-vet-and-luthi

02/01/14 - DESPERATELY SEEKING SYMMETRY - This hour, Jad and Robert set out in search of order and balance in the worl

http://www.radiolab.org/story/122382-desperately-seeking-symmetry/

Help

Jan 27, 2014

1/25/2014 - HELP - What do you do when your own worst enemy is...you?  Radiolab looks for ways to gain the upper hand over those forces inside us--from unhealthy urges, to creative insights -- that seem to have a mind of their own.  We meet a Cold War negotiator who, in order to quit smoking, backs himself into a tactical corner, and we visit a clinic in Russia where patients turn to a radical treatment to help fight their demons.  Plus, Elizabeth Gilbert on doing battle with your muses.

Stress

Jan 27, 2014

1/18/2014 - STRESS - Stress may save your life if you're being chased by a tiger.  But if you're stuck in traffic, it may be more likely to make you sick.  This hour we take a long hard look at the body's system for getting out of trouble.  Stanford University neurologist (and  part-time "baboonologist") Dr. Robert Sapolsky takes us through what happens on our insides when we stand in the wrong line at the supermarket, and offers a few coping strategies.  Plus:  the story of a singer who lost her voice, and an author stick in a body that never grew up.

Blood

Jan 27, 2014

1/11/2014 - BLOOD - From medicine to the movies, the horrifying to the holy, and history to the present day  -- we consider the power and magic of the red liquid that runs through our veins.  We meet an artist who opened his veins and got labeled a terrorist, douse ourselves in the meat and metaphors of blood in Shakespeare, wonder if clues to a gory fountain of youth could be lurking in the red blood cells of mice, and trace the complicated supply chain that gets blood from arms to operating tables.

Time

Jan 27, 2014

1/4/2014 - TIME - This hour of Radiolab, we try our hand at unlocking the mysteries of time.  We stretch and bend time, wrestle with its subjective nature, and wrap our minds around strategies to standardize it...stoppign along the way at a 19th-century railroad station in Ohio, a track meet, and a Beethoven concert.

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