MTPR

Documentary Special

Sunday 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

A different documentary special is featured each week.

02/22/2015 - Segment 1:  Culture of Secrecy Leaves Door Open for Sex Abuse; Segment 2: Torture Tactics Go Beyond the CIA; Segment 3: Duking it out With Telecom Giants

http://www.revealnews.org/episodes/the-secrets-of-church-state-and-business/

2/15/2015 - In late 2014, Amazon and the publishing house Hachette settled a months-long dispute over who should set the price for e-books. In Amazon’s view, lower prices mean more sales and more readers, and that benefits everyone. But for publishers, the price of an e-book must reflect the investment made, from the author’s advance to a book’s production. The conflict, resolved for now, has only raised more questions about the value of books, Amazon’s business practices, and the role of publishers. Is book publishing an oligopoly, a dinosaur in need of disruption?

MTPR Radio Theater

Feb 5, 2015

02/08/2015 - UM journalism professor Ray Ekness loves old radio plays. “I've always been interested in radio dramas going back to my days in college listening to War of the Worlds.”  Ekness produced two versions of War of the Worlds with an MTPR cast last year, one faithful to the original script and one very funny Montana version.

(Broadcast dates:  Sunday, February 8, 2015, 6:00 p.m. and Sunday, April 12, 2015, 6:00 p.m.)

UM journalism professor Ray Ekness loves old radio plays. “I've always been interested in radio dramas going back to my days in college listening to War of the Worlds.”

02/01/2014 -– Reveal – A new monthly series from The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX. In this episode, hear stories including a look at the surrogacy industry, how Americans may not be protected from many toxic chemicals, loopholes in daycare data, and much, much more.

http://www.revealnews.org/episodes/

01/25/2015 - The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there’s plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning.

01/11/2015 - Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

01/04/2015 - Talks about protecting the climate are peppered with Megawatts and BTU’s; parts per million and fugitive methane; wind velocity and crop yields. All these terms can make your head spin – even if you understand and accept that humans are frying the Earth. But behind the numbers are hearts and minds. And that’s what we’re talking about today. How do people think about climate change? Why aren’t more Americans engaged and actively addressing the most pressing issue of our times? And how do social groups shape individual attitudes toward climate disruption?

12/28/2014 - The end of the year is nigh! Hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot look back at The Best Albums of 2014. What did 2014 sound like? What are the albums you need to know about? And what albums should you put under the tree? Find out during this special FREE hour of Sound Opinions. Available to all stations.

https://beta.prx.org/stories/137447

Hanukkah Lights 2014

Dec 16, 2014

12/21/2014 - A perennial NPR favorite with brand new Hanukkah stories written by acclaimed authors Debra Ginsberg, Anne Burt, Simone Zelitch, Andy Borowitz, and Theodore Bikel.  Hear a wide variety of stories perfect for the holiday.  Hosted by Susan Stamberg and Murray Horwitz.

Hidden Kitchens World

Dec 11, 2014

12/14/2014 - The Kitchen Sisters and PRX present Hidden Kitchens World, a new hour of kitchen stories that travel the world. A broadcast special rich with great stories, music, sound, host and guest stars – Academy Award-winner Frances McDormand, Gael Garcia Bernal (star of Motorcycle Diaries and Jon Stewart’s new film, Rosewater), Werner Herzog, Salman Rushdie and Lawrence Ferlinghetti.

12/07/2014 - Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt were the “first couple” of American radio. From the 1920s through FDR’s fourth term, the president and first lady used this extraordinarily powerful new medium to win elections, combat the Great Depression and rally the nation to fight fascism. Eleanor Roosevelt’s radio work is almost entirely forgotten. But she was a radio star in her own right — with commercial sponsors paying top dollar for her talents as a news commentator.

11/13/2014 -  Income inequality has been on the rise for decades. In the last 30 years, the wages of the top 1% have grown by 154%, while the bottom 90% has seen growth of only 17%. As the rungs of the economic ladder move further and further apart, conventional wisdom says that it will become much more difficult to climb them.

http://intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/past-debates/item/1159-income-inequality-impairs-the-american-dream

10/30/2014 - On this Halloween special, the History Guys explore Americans' relationship with ghosts, spirits, and witches throughout our nation's history. Why were colonists so fearful of New England "witches"? How is it that progressive social reformers found a home in the Spiritualist movement of the 19th century? Why do new media technologies always conjure talk of the undead? Can social upheaval help explain our history with the ineffable?

10/09/2014 - The global energy economy is undergoing tectonic shifts. America is poised to be an oil exporter - something unthinkable a decade ago - and severe weather and climate disruption are driving a push toward clean fuels. On the next Climate One, Host Greg Dalton talks with business leaders, scientists and authors about the path toward a prosperous and sustainable economy.  He will also talk about what is driving the droughts, floods and other freaky weather around the country.

10/02/2014 - An Intelligence Squared Debate - In K-12 education, there is nothing more controversial than the Common Core State Standards, national academic standards in English and math. Adopted by more than 40 states, they were developed, in part, to address concerns that American students were falling behind their foreign counterparts. Has the federal government overreached and saddled our schools with standards that have been flawed from the start? The debaters are Carmel Martin, Carol Burris, Michael Petrill, and Frederick Hess.

09/25/2014 - An Intelligence Squared Debate – Is independent political speech the linchpin of our democracy or its Achilles' heel?   For democracy to work, some say, citizens (and corporations, and unions, and media outlets, and other voluntary organizations) must be allowed to express their views on the issues, candidates, and elections of the day. This proposition, they say, is exactly why the First Amendment protects the freedom of speech and of the press. On this view, restrictions on independent political speech undermine and subvert our constitutional structure.

Ready to Work

Sep 18, 2014

09/18/2014 - Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is “college for all.” But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don’t require a bachelor’s degree. Many experts say it’s time to bring back career and technical education.

This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

The New Face of College

Sep 18, 2014

09/11/2014 - Just 20 percent of college-goers fit the stereotype of being young, single, full-time students who finish a degree in four years. College students today are more likely to be older, part-time, working, and low-income than they were three decades ago. Many are the first in their families to go to college.

This American RadioWorks documentary shows how universities are adapting to serve these new students. It explains changing demographics, and explores what colleges must do to remain engines of social mobility.

09/04/2014 - The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there’s plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards.

The Science of Smart

Sep 18, 2014

08/28/14 - Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

08/14/2014 - If consciousness is just the workings of neurons and synapses, how do we explain the phenomenon of near-death experience? By some accounts, about 3% of the U.S. population has had one: an out-of-body experience often characterized by remarkable visions and feelings of peace and joy, all while the physical body is close to death. To skeptics, there are more plausible, natural explanations, like oxygen deprivation. Is the prospect of an existence after death “real” and provable by science, or a construct of wishful thinking about our own mortality.

08/07/2014 -Americans, and especially Californians, have had a big dose of severe drought this year. Though it hit the state hard, farmers were the most effected. They continue to worry about the threat the water shortage poses to their multi-million dollar almond, kiwi and walnut crops. The answer has been to irrigate crops with water that is pumped up from underground stores. The problem is that so many farmers are digging so fast and pumping so much water, that the aquifer levels are in danger of depletion. That puts the agriculture industry ultimately at risk.

0731/2014 - Is independent political speech the linchpin of our democracy or its Achilles' heel?   For democracy to work, some say, citizens (and corporations, and unions, and media outlets, and other voluntary organizations) must be allowed to express their views on the issues, candidates, and elections of the day. This proposition, they say, is exactly why the First Amendment protects the freedom of speech and of the press. On this view, restrictions on independent political speech undermine and subvert our constitutional structure.

Reveal - PILOT

Jul 15, 2014

07/17/2014 - Reveal is a new investigative program from the The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX. In this pilot: an exclusive story about the volume and impact stemming from the VA's over-prescripton of opiates to addicted veterans; the attorney behind many of the worst for-profit charities; bodycams for cops; and how one reporter helped one man prove his brother had been abused at a state mental facility. Hosted by Al Letson from State of the Re:Union and WJCT, Jacksonville.

07/10/2014 -

Millennials—growing up with revolutionary technology and entering adulthood in a time of recession—have recently been much maligned. Are their critics right? Is this generation uniquely coddled, narcissistic, and lazy? Or have we let conventional wisdom blind us to their openness to change and innovation, and optimism in the face of uncertainty, which, in any generation, are qualities to be admired? The debaters are Binta Niambi Brown, David D. Burstein, W. Keith Campbell, and Jessica Grose.

07/03/2014 - Tune in on July 3 at 1:00 p.m. for this pre-Independence Day celebration. Enjoy the Capitol Steps' one-hour long special, "Politics Takes a Holiday!"

The Capitol Steps will address timely issues set to show tunes! There's John Kerry singing "How Do You Solve a Problem Like Crimea?" and Hillary Clinton admonishing Joe Biden to "Let It Go" when it comes to running for President. It's a show so clogged with jokes that Chris Christie threatened to shut it down!

06/26/2014 - Film, music, and art are often the best ways to capture the will and the mood of the people in times of turmoil.  Art sometimes has the power to move millions where politics fails. So in this program we attempt to identify some prominent artistic voices in the Middle East, North Africa, and in South Asia and evaluate their take on liberal ideals, on sectarian violence, on terrorism and how they're being received by audiences in both the Arab and Muslim communities and in the West.

06/19/2014 - Today we are talking about our green future – green energy and greenbacks. The news for business is good: When companies use less energy, they save money and create more jobs. Our guests include an eminent economist and a U.S. climate negotiator, both looking for ways to protect the planet while keeping the world economy on track. We will also look at how Walmart is going green to boost to boost their bottom line.

http://www.climate-one.org/

06/12/2014 - What's Your Story?

Research confirms that our minds depend on story as the main roadmap for comprehending, deciphering, recalling and organizing our lives. Why do stories have such power over our beliefs and our behaviors? Why did we evolve to be storytelling animals?

http://www2.pri.org/infosite/networknews/trbq.cfm

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