Documentary Special

Sunday 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

A different documentary special is featured each week.

Ready to Work

Sep 18, 2014

09/18/2014 - Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is “college for all.” But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don’t require a bachelor’s degree. Many experts say it’s time to bring back career and technical education.

This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

The New Face of College

Sep 18, 2014

09/11/2014 - Just 20 percent of college-goers fit the stereotype of being young, single, full-time students who finish a degree in four years. College students today are more likely to be older, part-time, working, and low-income than they were three decades ago. Many are the first in their families to go to college.

This American RadioWorks documentary shows how universities are adapting to serve these new students. It explains changing demographics, and explores what colleges must do to remain engines of social mobility.

09/04/2014 - The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there’s plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards.

The Science of Smart

Sep 18, 2014

08/28/14 - Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.

In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

08/14/2014 - If consciousness is just the workings of neurons and synapses, how do we explain the phenomenon of near-death experience? By some accounts, about 3% of the U.S. population has had one: an out-of-body experience often characterized by remarkable visions and feelings of peace and joy, all while the physical body is close to death. To skeptics, there are more plausible, natural explanations, like oxygen deprivation. Is the prospect of an existence after death “real” and provable by science, or a construct of wishful thinking about our own mortality.

08/07/2014 -Americans, and especially Californians, have had a big dose of severe drought this year. Though it hit the state hard, farmers were the most effected. They continue to worry about the threat the water shortage poses to their multi-million dollar almond, kiwi and walnut crops. The answer has been to irrigate crops with water that is pumped up from underground stores. The problem is that so many farmers are digging so fast and pumping so much water, that the aquifer levels are in danger of depletion. That puts the agriculture industry ultimately at risk.

0731/2014 - Is independent political speech the linchpin of our democracy or its Achilles' heel?   For democracy to work, some say, citizens (and corporations, and unions, and media outlets, and other voluntary organizations) must be allowed to express their views on the issues, candidates, and elections of the day. This proposition, they say, is exactly why the First Amendment protects the freedom of speech and of the press. On this view, restrictions on independent political speech undermine and subvert our constitutional structure.

Reveal - PILOT

Jul 15, 2014

07/17/2014 - Reveal is a new investigative program from the The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX. In this pilot: an exclusive story about the volume and impact stemming from the VA's over-prescripton of opiates to addicted veterans; the attorney behind many of the worst for-profit charities; bodycams for cops; and how one reporter helped one man prove his brother had been abused at a state mental facility. Hosted by Al Letson from State of the Re:Union and WJCT, Jacksonville.

07/10/2014 -

Millennials—growing up with revolutionary technology and entering adulthood in a time of recession—have recently been much maligned. Are their critics right? Is this generation uniquely coddled, narcissistic, and lazy? Or have we let conventional wisdom blind us to their openness to change and innovation, and optimism in the face of uncertainty, which, in any generation, are qualities to be admired? The debaters are Binta Niambi Brown, David D. Burstein, W. Keith Campbell, and Jessica Grose.

07/03/2014 - Tune in on July 3 at 1:00 p.m. for this pre-Independence Day celebration. Enjoy the Capitol Steps' one-hour long special, "Politics Takes a Holiday!"

The Capitol Steps will address timely issues set to show tunes! There's John Kerry singing "How Do You Solve a Problem Like Crimea?" and Hillary Clinton admonishing Joe Biden to "Let It Go" when it comes to running for President. It's a show so clogged with jokes that Chris Christie threatened to shut it down!

06/26/2014 - Film, music, and art are often the best ways to capture the will and the mood of the people in times of turmoil.  Art sometimes has the power to move millions where politics fails. So in this program we attempt to identify some prominent artistic voices in the Middle East, North Africa, and in South Asia and evaluate their take on liberal ideals, on sectarian violence, on terrorism and how they're being received by audiences in both the Arab and Muslim communities and in the West.

06/19/2014 - Today we are talking about our green future – green energy and greenbacks. The news for business is good: When companies use less energy, they save money and create more jobs. Our guests include an eminent economist and a U.S. climate negotiator, both looking for ways to protect the planet while keeping the world economy on track. We will also look at how Walmart is going green to boost to boost their bottom line.

http://www.climate-one.org/

06/12/2014 - What's Your Story?

Research confirms that our minds depend on story as the main roadmap for comprehending, deciphering, recalling and organizing our lives. Why do stories have such power over our beliefs and our behaviors? Why did we evolve to be storytelling animals?

http://www2.pri.org/infosite/networknews/trbq.cfm

06/05/2014 - Is the college of the future online? With the popularity of MOOCs (massive open online courses) and the availability of online degree programs at a fraction of their on-campus price, we are experiencing an exciting experiment in higher education. Does the traditional classroom stand a chance? Will online education be the great equalizer, or is a campus-based college experience still necessary? The debaters are Anant Agarwal, Jonathan Cole, Ben Nelson, and Rebecca Schuman.

05/22/2014 - What is a good death?

Most people hope to die quickly, or go quietly at home, surrounded by family. But most of us won’t die that way. More often, we die in intensive care. Perhaps fear keeps us from the good death we wish for. In this program, we hear from people seeking to bring engagement with death back into our culture, through death salons, green funerals, and meaningful end-of-life care.

http://www2.pri.org/infosite/networknews/trbq.cfm

05/15/2014 - Why Does Music Move Us? Music exists in every culture. Does that mean it offers an evolutionary advantage? What drives humans to make music? And why does music get so deeply embedded into our lives? We’ll delve deeper into what music can teach us about the human brain – with musicians and researchers including:

05/08/2014 - Why Do We Share?

Are humans basically selfish, or basically giving? There’s a widespread assumption that you have to offer people incentives to do good deeds and threaten punishment to stop them from doing evil deeds. But the way people act in the real world contradicts that idea. Humans may actually have been shaped by evolution to care about each other, to share, and to cooperate. In this program, we hear from a fascinating cast of characters:

05/01/2014 - What is this thing called love?

This program ponders the “why” behind humans’ drive to pair up. Why do human beings feel romantic love? What happens to the brains of people who are in love? How can scientifically studying love help us navigate our relationships? A fascinating cast of characters tackles these questions head-on: 

04/24/2014 - Affirmative action, when used as a factor in college admissions, is meant to foster diversity and provide equal opportunities in education for under represented minorities. But is it achieving its stated goals and helping the population it was created to support? Its critics point to students struggling to keep up in schools mismatched to their abilities and to the fact that the policy can be manipulated to benefit affluent and middle class students who already possess many educational advantages. Is it time to overhaul or abolish affirmative action?  

Adapting to Climate Change

Apr 10, 2014

04/17/2014 -No matter what you believe about climate change, we can all agree that extreme weather events -- tornadoes, hurri canes, fires, droughts -- are occurring more frequently. These massive natural disasters upset lives and devastate property.  The costs of clean-up and reconstruction are enormous. 

 

04/10/2014 - There are questions we would answer, if only we were asked.  How did we grow up?  What do we remember about home?  What about our family?

celebrate the first decade of StoryCorps, with a special retrospective hosted by NPR’s Scott Simon and StoryCorps founder Dave Isay.

http://storycorps.org/

MTPR Special Shorts

Mar 31, 2014

04/10/2014 - The best of short form public radio

03/27/2014 - "Does the president have the constitutional power to target and kill U.S. citizens abroad?"  With the drone strike on accused terrorist and New Mexico-born Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen, President Obama has tested the limits of the executive branch's powers.  Does the president have constitutional authority under the due process clause to kill U.S.

Notes on Spring

Mar 12, 2014

03/20/2014 - A Seasonal Special - An assuring hour of music and information about the promising resurgence of spring, including rare facts about the featured music and the reasons for springtime warming and rain.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/45202-notes-on-spring-a-seasonal-music-special

Votes for Women!

Feb 27, 2014

03/06/2014 - Votes For Women was the slogan on the banners that many American Suffragists wore in their 72-year struggle to get the vote.  Although American men had been voting since the 1700's, it wasn't until 1920 that American women were allowed to vote for President.  Award winning Producer Sandra Sleight-Brennan's documentary uses song, interviews, re-creations of events, and comments from historians to bring this dramatic history to life.

"Civil Rights in America"

Feb 24, 2014

02/27/2014 - Hosted by Charles Dutton, this one-hour special examines the relevance and meaning of civil rights in the 21st century and the relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts of women, other people of color, and the LGBT community to expand our traditional definitions of equality. Like “Moments of the Movement” it features first-person narratives culled from hundreds of hours of never-before-broadcast video and audio footage to provide a rich, detailed history of the nation during an important and tumultuous period.

2/20/2014 - During a month selected to celebrate “history,” we certainly are treated to a lot of the same familiar stories: the battles won for Civil Rights, the glory of Martin Luther King Jr.’s words, the hardships endured by slaves. And as important as those narratives are for us to collectively remember, many others get lost in trumpeting the same heroic tales. In this hour, State of the Re:Union zeroes in some of those alternate narratives, ones edited out of the mainstream imagining of Black History, deconstructing the popular perception of certain celebrated moments.

2/13/2014 - The History Guys explore three centuries of pre-marital intimacy.  Did economic considerations used to play a greater role in coupling? In what ways have dating practices challenged class and racial boundaries?  Has the idea of "romance" itself morphed over time?  Considering the stereotypes about Puritan New England, you might be surprised to learn that sweethearts in the 18th century were no only allowed to sleep together before marriage - they were encouraged!  The catch?

2/6/2014 - Among the most iconic landscapes in America is the Western Range, a stretch of millions of acres of land, much of it remote and undeveloped.  Deep traditions tie people to this land.  But in the 21st century, it is also contested ground.  Development pressures threaten open space as the Sun Belt becomes an economic powerhouse.  Border issues mean life in some of these rural places has been transformed by violence and politics.  But new ways are being forged on these fronts, ways that involve collaboration, innovation, and the rediscovery and re-imagining of history on...the new S

1/30/2014 - Intelligence Squared US presents - With the disastrous launch of the HealthCare.gov website, critics of the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare,” were given more fuel for the fire. Is this political hot potato's inevitability once again at stake? And is the medical community really on board with the law, or resisting (rewriting?) it from the sidelines?

http://intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/past-debates/item/1016-obamacare-is-now-beyond-rescue

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