MTPR

Documentary Special

Sunday 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

A different documentary special is featured each week.

06/05/2014 - Is the college of the future online? With the popularity of MOOCs (massive open online courses) and the availability of online degree programs at a fraction of their on-campus price, we are experiencing an exciting experiment in higher education. Does the traditional classroom stand a chance? Will online education be the great equalizer, or is a campus-based college experience still necessary? The debaters are Anant Agarwal, Jonathan Cole, Ben Nelson, and Rebecca Schuman.

05/22/2014 - What is a good death?

Most people hope to die quickly, or go quietly at home, surrounded by family. But most of us won’t die that way. More often, we die in intensive care. Perhaps fear keeps us from the good death we wish for. In this program, we hear from people seeking to bring engagement with death back into our culture, through death salons, green funerals, and meaningful end-of-life care.

http://www2.pri.org/infosite/networknews/trbq.cfm

05/15/2014 - Why Does Music Move Us? Music exists in every culture. Does that mean it offers an evolutionary advantage? What drives humans to make music? And why does music get so deeply embedded into our lives? We’ll delve deeper into what music can teach us about the human brain – with musicians and researchers including:

05/08/2014 - Why Do We Share?

Are humans basically selfish, or basically giving? There’s a widespread assumption that you have to offer people incentives to do good deeds and threaten punishment to stop them from doing evil deeds. But the way people act in the real world contradicts that idea. Humans may actually have been shaped by evolution to care about each other, to share, and to cooperate. In this program, we hear from a fascinating cast of characters:

05/01/2014 - What is this thing called love?

This program ponders the “why” behind humans’ drive to pair up. Why do human beings feel romantic love? What happens to the brains of people who are in love? How can scientifically studying love help us navigate our relationships? A fascinating cast of characters tackles these questions head-on: 

04/24/2014 - Affirmative action, when used as a factor in college admissions, is meant to foster diversity and provide equal opportunities in education for under represented minorities. But is it achieving its stated goals and helping the population it was created to support? Its critics point to students struggling to keep up in schools mismatched to their abilities and to the fact that the policy can be manipulated to benefit affluent and middle class students who already possess many educational advantages. Is it time to overhaul or abolish affirmative action?  

Adapting to Climate Change

Apr 10, 2014

04/17/2014 -No matter what you believe about climate change, we can all agree that extreme weather events -- tornadoes, hurri canes, fires, droughts -- are occurring more frequently. These massive natural disasters upset lives and devastate property.  The costs of clean-up and reconstruction are enormous. 

 

04/10/2014 - There are questions we would answer, if only we were asked.  How did we grow up?  What do we remember about home?  What about our family?

celebrate the first decade of StoryCorps, with a special retrospective hosted by NPR’s Scott Simon and StoryCorps founder Dave Isay.

http://storycorps.org/

MTPR Special Shorts

Mar 31, 2014

04/10/2014 - The best of short form public radio

03/27/2014 - "Does the president have the constitutional power to target and kill U.S. citizens abroad?"  With the drone strike on accused terrorist and New Mexico-born Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen, President Obama has tested the limits of the executive branch's powers.  Does the president have constitutional authority under the due process clause to kill U.S.

Notes on Spring

Mar 12, 2014

03/20/2014 - A Seasonal Special - An assuring hour of music and information about the promising resurgence of spring, including rare facts about the featured music and the reasons for springtime warming and rain.

http://www.prx.org/pieces/45202-notes-on-spring-a-seasonal-music-special

Votes for Women!

Feb 27, 2014

03/06/2014 - Votes For Women was the slogan on the banners that many American Suffragists wore in their 72-year struggle to get the vote.  Although American men had been voting since the 1700's, it wasn't until 1920 that American women were allowed to vote for President.  Award winning Producer Sandra Sleight-Brennan's documentary uses song, interviews, re-creations of events, and comments from historians to bring this dramatic history to life.

"Civil Rights in America"

Feb 24, 2014

02/27/2014 - Hosted by Charles Dutton, this one-hour special examines the relevance and meaning of civil rights in the 21st century and the relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts of women, other people of color, and the LGBT community to expand our traditional definitions of equality. Like “Moments of the Movement” it features first-person narratives culled from hundreds of hours of never-before-broadcast video and audio footage to provide a rich, detailed history of the nation during an important and tumultuous period.

2/20/2014 - During a month selected to celebrate “history,” we certainly are treated to a lot of the same familiar stories: the battles won for Civil Rights, the glory of Martin Luther King Jr.’s words, the hardships endured by slaves. And as important as those narratives are for us to collectively remember, many others get lost in trumpeting the same heroic tales. In this hour, State of the Re:Union zeroes in some of those alternate narratives, ones edited out of the mainstream imagining of Black History, deconstructing the popular perception of certain celebrated moments.

2/13/2014 - The History Guys explore three centuries of pre-marital intimacy.  Did economic considerations used to play a greater role in coupling? In what ways have dating practices challenged class and racial boundaries?  Has the idea of "romance" itself morphed over time?  Considering the stereotypes about Puritan New England, you might be surprised to learn that sweethearts in the 18th century were no only allowed to sleep together before marriage - they were encouraged!  The catch?

2/6/2014 - Among the most iconic landscapes in America is the Western Range, a stretch of millions of acres of land, much of it remote and undeveloped.  Deep traditions tie people to this land.  But in the 21st century, it is also contested ground.  Development pressures threaten open space as the Sun Belt becomes an economic powerhouse.  Border issues mean life in some of these rural places has been transformed by violence and politics.  But new ways are being forged on these fronts, ways that involve collaboration, innovation, and the rediscovery and re-imagining of history on...the new S

1/30/2014 - Intelligence Squared US presents - With the disastrous launch of the HealthCare.gov website, critics of the Affordable Care Act, or “Obamacare,” were given more fuel for the fire. Is this political hot potato's inevitability once again at stake? And is the medical community really on board with the law, or resisting (rewriting?) it from the sidelines?

http://intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/past-debates/item/1016-obamacare-is-now-beyond-rescue

 

1/23/2014 - According to a 2009 poll, around 1% of American adults reported eating no animal products. In 2011 that number rose to 2.5%--more than double, but still dwarfed by the 48% who reported eating meat, fish or poultry at all of their meals. In this country, most of us are blessed with an abundance of food and food choices. So taking into account our health, the environment and ethical concerns, which diet is best? Are we or aren't we meant to be carnivores?

1/9/2014 - An 

- The NSA collects data on billions of phone calls and internet communications per day.  Are these surveillance programs legal?  Do they keep us safe?  What tradeoffs are we willing to make between security and privacy? As Benjamin Franklin might have asked, "Are we giving up essential liberty to purchase temporary safety, and thus deserving of neither?"  The debaters are Stewart Baker, David Cole, Richard Falkenrath, and Michael German.

1/2/2014 - An Intelligence Squared Debate - Recent mass shooting tragedies have renewed the national debate over the 2nd Amendment.  Gun ownership and homicide rates are higher in the U.S.

12/19/2013 - If you want to get rid of a nasty invasive pest, it might seem sensible to offer a bounty.  But as we'll hear in this episode of Freakonomics Radio, bounties can backfire.  We look at bounties on snakes in Delhi, rats in Hanoi, and feral pigs in Fort Benning, Georgia.  In each case, bounty seekers came up with creative ways to maximize their payoff - and pest populations grew.  Host Stephen Dubner talks to Steve Levitt about how incentives don't always work out the way you'd expect.

12/12/13 - This month America Abroad takes listeners to Mexico and Nigeria to meet the many faces of global entrepreneurship.

Hanukkah Lights 2013

12/5/2013 - A perennial NPR favorite, Hanukkah Lights features stories and memoirs written by acclaimed authors expressly for the show, as read by NPR's Susan Stamberg and Murray Horwitz.

11/28/2013 - With music and stories for Thanksgiving, it's Giving Thanks

New for 2013, two wise, witty women join us at the table:

Julia Sweeney, celebrated writer and actor, she is best known from Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me! and Saturday Night Live.  Sweeney's memories and monologues on faith give her humor a deep human touch that is perfect for Thanksgiving.

November 21, 2013 - Never before broadcast memories from JFK's confidantes recorded just after the assassination.  The special is hosted by legendary journalist, Robert MacNeil.  For background, more from and about the contributors, and to hear the program itself, visit our website:  weknewjfk.org

Listeners will hear from JFK colleagues who were with him during his first political race in 1946, until his last days in office.

Famous names and voices wrestle with grief and memory; they provide intimate details on JFK the man, the president, and father.

Chris Julin

Join MTPR on Thursday October 24 at 1:00 MDT as we air Rising Seas, a presentation of BURN: an energy journal.

Rising Seas is presented in four segments. You can listen to them here:

10/24/2013 - A Climate Change Week Documentary – While all coastal cities face real trouble, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development says Miami is the most vulnerable in its assessment of threats to 50 major cities worldwide. Parts of Miami will be permanently flooded in as few as 15 years.

10/17/2013 - Women are different from men in some key areas. For example, the data show that women don’t drown, edit Wikipedia, commit crime, or file patents at anywhere near the same rate as men do. How else are women different?

http://freakonomics.com/

10/10/2013 -An Intelligence Squared Debate - Is the U.S. Drone Program Fatally Flawed?  Do drones hurt, or help, in our fight against terrorism? The debaters are Ahmed Rashid, John Kael Weston, Admiral Dennis Blair (USN, Ret.) and General Norton Schwartz (USAF, Ret.)

http://intelligencesquaredus.org/

10/3/2013 - To an economist, tipping is a puzzling behavior – why pay extra when it’s not required? Host, Stephen Dubner looks at why we tip, which factors affect the amount, and whether tipping should perhaps be eliminated altogether.

http://freakonomics.com/

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