Food Guys

Sunday 11:52 AM - 12:00 PM

From favorite seasonal recipes, to the roots of our food traditions, to the politics of food, the Food Guys illuminate the culinary world each Sunday, in this 10 minute program produced by Montana Public Radio.

The Food Guys have also been featured on NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday.

 

Recipes: Vegetables, The French Way

Apr 4, 2015
Flickr user, Laurel F

With fondness, Greg recalls two of his earliest encounters with Julia Child: her 1961 book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and the long-running PBS television series, "The French Chef."

Flickr user, woodleywonderworks

After months of cooking with root vegetables, Jon is desperate for green stuff, but he's reluctant to buy vegetables flown in from thousands of miles away.

The Thrifty Gene Hypothesis And Its Offspring

Mar 21, 2015
D. Sellayah et al/Endocrinology 2014, adapted by E. Otwell

The Food Guys discuss the "Thrifty Gene Hypothesis," proposed in 1962 by geneticist James V. Neel, which prompted investigation into a genetic and evolutionary basis for diabetes among some human populations who had only recently been introduced to the Western diet of the 1960s.

Edgar 181

Jon discusses the sugar alcohol, erythritol, which is virtually calorie-free and doesn't cause as large a blood sugar spike as sucrose or high-fructose corn syrup.

Flickr user, Jewel 'o the Desert

Jon recalls driving through Castroville, CA ("Artichoke Center of the World") one spring, when he encountered the annual Castroville Artichoke Festival. "The artichoke, for such an unlikely-looking food item, is widespread and adapted among so many cultures and cuisines around the world, it's startling," he observes.

The Food Guys Talk Farro, The Ancient Grain

Feb 26, 2015
Flickr user, Joel Rogness

Today Jon and Greg discuss farro. Farro is a popular grain that can trace its origins thousands of years back around the time of ancient Egyptian rule.

There are three types of farro. First, there is farro piccolo, which is the smallest of the farro grains. Then there's farro medio, which is called emmer. Then there is farro grande which is known as spelt. Spelt is a type of farro that is really a different grain altogether.   

Flickr user, Miss Anna Lynn Martino

Greg gives instructions for his adaptation of an old Nantucket cranberry pecan muffin recipe. Thaw the butter, get some heavy cream and buttermilk, and hunt down your ice cream scoop.

(Broadcast: "The Food Guys," 2/22/15. Listen weekly on the radio at 11:50 a.m. Sundays, or via podcast.)

Cranberry Pecan Muffins

Flickr user, Julia Rubinic

Greg and Jon discuss a 2013 New York Times article by Kenneth Chang titled "More Helpful Fatty Acids Found in Organic Milk." Chang writes: "Whole milk from organic dairies contains far more of some of the fatty acids that contribute to a healthy heart than conventional milk."  Greg distinguishes between omega-6 fatty acids, which abound in the typical American diet, and o

Flickr user, Anna Lynn Martino

Beef stew with rice, onions, bacon, tomatoes and cheese: that's the basis for Julia Child's recipe for "Boeuf À La Catalane," or Catalan Beef Stew. It became the jumping-off point for an adaptation by Greg one night as he improvised on this "hearty dish from the Spanish Mediterranean corner of France," with "a green salad, French bread, and a strong, young red wine" the recommended accompaniment.

Flickr user, Mike Licht

Jon and Greg speculate that widespread under-appreciation of parsnips is due to their resemblance to "an anemic carrot."  Jon recalls the sweet and flavorful parsnips kept buried in a box of soil in the root cellar by his gardener father, the taste of which approached the mythic sweetness of mature parsnips left in the ground all winter. Greg suggests roasting them, puréeing with potatoes, deep-frying them as chips, or including them in a recipe for root-vegetable custard.

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