MTPR

Home Ground

Sunday 11:10 a.m. -11:40 a.m.

Home Ground Radio with Brian Kahn

Home Ground Radio is a half-hour public affairs program with topics that range from the environment to the politics of Montana and the rural west. In each program, host Brian Kahn conducts one or two in-depth interviews.

Home Ground Radio podcast

Ways to Connect

Jim Weber, machine shop teacher at Capital High School in Helena, wants to prepare students for the real world of modern manufacturing. His two-year welding and machining program includes cutting-edge equipment, field trips, internship opportunities and recruiting networks. But it also incorporates formalized curriculum intended to instill a strong work ethic.

From Ruth Garfield, a female sheriff in 1920, to Elouise Cobell, a Blackfeet banker in the 21st Century, women have significantly shaped the state and communities across Montana. Beyond Schoolmarms and Madams celebrates the 100th anniversary of women winning the right to vote in Montana, six years before the 19th Amendment. Two of the authors, Annie Hanshew and Laura Ferguson, discuss how the Montana Historical Society selected the collection of women's stories.

After high school, Kipp McGuire joined the Marine Corps and served in Iraq and Afghanistan. He earned a college degree in political science, worked as a bouncer and a congressional aide. Now he's pursuing a graduate degree in international relations.

Cycling Towards Climate Solutions

Nov 20, 2016

Mindy Ahler and Ryan Hall are biking over 4,000 miles from Oregon to Washington, D.C., stopping in communities along the way to discuss local climate change solutions and federal policies. They recently passed through Montana and met with Home Ground host Brian Kahn to share their motivations and hopes for the future. To find out more about the ride, visit Mindy and Ryan's blog Low Carbon Crossings.

For nearly 40 years, Ray Kuntz has been involved in commercial trucking. He built a national company operating from Montana and worked for driver safety and major reductions in exhaust pollution. As a citizen, he’s stayed engaged on social issues ranging from reducing roadside fatalities to fighting mental illness.

As a child, he sensed that he had leadership ability, and in World War II, he had a chance to demonstrate it. An active family life and law practice followed. Now at age 92, Bob Anderson reflects on a distinguished career and the experiences that shaped his character. 

Remembering Distinguished Veteran, Ben Steele

Oct 24, 2016

Early this month, flags across Montana were flown at half-mast to honor World War II veteran Ben Steele. We interviewed Ben several years ago. What he had to say is very much worth hearing again.

Montana Supreme Court candidate Dirk Sandefur believes his life experiences provide common sense and  intuitive insights in court, but personal or ideological values of associated groups should not drive legal decisions. Judge Sandefur says, "I have a 14-year career in one of Montana's busiest judicial districts of deciding cases based on the facts and law without any consideration of my personal political views or other philosophical views that I have." Sandefur is one of two candidates running for the Montana Supreme Court, which is tasked with interpreting and upholding the state's constitution.

Montana Supreme Court Candidate Kristen Juras says she would be the only justice who has irrigated a hay field in addition to filing and defending water rights claims. Juras has 34 years of experience representing farmers, ranchers, small business owners, non-profit organizations and individuals in the daily legal issues they face. She currently teaches at the University of Montana School of Law and says she would "bring an area of expertise that is currently lacking in the court."

What is the oldest branch of the U.S. military? The Army? The Navy? No: it’s the National Guard, founded in 1636, 140 years before our Declaration of Independence. Adjutant General Gene Prendergast knows that. He served in the Montana Guard for 47 years. It is a career marked by innovation, commitment and creativity.

The grizzly bear is Montana’s state mammal, famous for its size, strength and intelligence. Grizzlies have been hunted for centuries by first peoples to obtain mythic power and by farmers and ranchers to protect livestock. In large swaths of the U.S., market hunters exterminated the great bear for its fur. With the grizzly off the endangered species list, should Montana allow trophy hunting? Dan Vermillion, chair of Montana's Fish & Wildlife Commission, joins us to discus on this episode of "Home Ground Radio."

In parts of the world wracked by violence, like Syria and Palestine, we often see images of destruction. But Samantha Robinson, founder and executive producer of Awareness & Prevention Through Art (aptART), is working to change that. She believes visual aesthetics play a significant role in psychological health, and by collaborating with communities to create bold murals, art can stimulate dialog and healing.

When Penelope Pierce drove through Montana's Paradise Valley in '85, she knew she was home. Now, as the Executive Director of the Gallatin Valley Land Trust, she has supported numerous conservation easements to protect large landscapes. Pierce believes that conservation has to make financial sense to people, and through cooperation and education, this type of model can prove successful.

For centuries, durable work clothes have been designed for men, but Sarah Calhoun, founder and owner of Red Ants Pants, is working to change that. This week on "Home Ground", we learn how White Sulfur Springs became the international headquarters of the first company dedicated to work-wear for women. It's also the home of the annual Red Ants Pants Music Festival, an event that supports rural families and communities across the state. 

'Home Ground Radio': Bob Ream, Part 2

Jul 24, 2016

Last week we talked with Bob Ream who's had an outstanding career in ecology, academics, and politics. This week we're talking about the politics. Bob Ream joins us for part two on this episode of "Home Ground".

'Home Ground Radio': Bob Ream, Part 1

Jul 22, 2016

If you're lucky in life, and/or determined, you get to choose how you use your time. Looking back, some careers stand out. Bob Ream's career in ecology, academics, and politics is one. Ream is the guest on this episode of "Home Ground Radio".

There have been no updates

The founders of our nation placed a great deal of trust in the role of a free press as the key to maintaining informed public opinion. Chuck Johnson, a professional newspaper reporter for 44 years, is in a good position to say how we're doing.

Crow Tribe Legislative Branch

R. Knute Old Crow grew up on the Crow Reservation, dreaming of being an architect. But hardship intervened, and Old Crow became a welder. He put himself through college, got into politics, and today, he's in his third term as Speaker of the House of the Crow Nation, looking to change the tribal economy's lack of opportunity.

Since Teddy Roosevelt’s time, there’ve been a fair number of hunting and angling organizations active in wildlife conservation. And if you pursue that passion in big, wild country, there’s one designed for people like you: Backcountry Hunters and Anglers. Land Tawney from Backcountry Hunters and Anglers is our guest on this episode of “Home Ground Radio."

Private enterprises use advertising to promote what they do. For government agencies, that’s usually forbidden. So we know very little about what public employees do, or whether it’s worth the money. That creates fertile ground for barroom experts and politicians to take potshots at them. Rich Bechtel has seen a lot in forty years in government, and what it takes to make it work.

For many years the Flathead valley was well known for hard-edged polarization around natural resource issues. That’s been changing, thanks to people like Stoltze Lumber’s Paul McKenzie and Dave Hadden of Headwaters Montana.

When the law is broken, law enforcement and the courts step in and lawbreakers often end up in jail or on probation. All this takes time and is very expensive, and the system can only handle so much. According to Chief Justice Mike McGrath, many of our courts have passed the limit.

'Home Ground': Meat & Morality

May 15, 2016

Since our species evolved some 200 million years ago, we’ve eaten what we could find — whether meat or plants. But with 7 billion people on the planet, the climate changing, and animals raised in factory farms, vegans say that if we have a choice, eating meat is morally wrong. Lisa Kemmerer weighs in on this episode of "Home Ground Radio".

Driving through Montana’s vast fields of grass, wheat and barley, the landscape looks unchanged. But in the last 60 years a lot has — rippling through the state, altering how we Montanans relate to each other. Farmer Joe Perry knows.

'Home Ground' Talks Healthcare Costs

May 12, 2016

You must have something that will cost between $35,000 and $50,000. But when you sign on the dotted line you don’t know what the bill will be or how good the product is. It sounds crazy, but you’ve just described much of the American medical system!

For more than 100 years, state fish and wildlife agencies have accepted the job of managing wildlife, usually but not exclusively those which are hunted for meat or trapped for fur. Managing in concept involves assessing and improving habitat, monitoring populations, setting seasons and bag limits on animals that can be taken - in short, allowing harvest while maintaining a health population. So imagine: you're supposed to manage wolverines. Mission impossible? Our guests today, who work for Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, talk about wolverines and the challenges around managing them.

What does it mean to speak a language? Fundamentally, it means you can communicate with another person.  Yet when the language is that of your Indian ancestors who go back to the mists of time it means that you carry that unique tradition.

'Home Ground': The Opiate Balancing Act

Mar 29, 2016

She faced unremitting, chronic pain — but no doctor would prescribe pain-killers that work. Why? Because they’re made from opium — a narcotic. So while doctors and police argued, she said to me calmly, "If this keeps up I will kill myself." On this episode of "Home Ground Radio" we'll hear first-hand about the problems chronic pain patients who rely on opiates face.

Music is universal to humankind, yet there are profound differences in music between cultures. Our guest today, Kurt Crowley, talked to us about the range of music and performance. He started playing piano in Montana at the age of 4, had a special talent. In eigth grade he got the prized Cook Scholarship to Saint Paul's Prep School. Then onto Harvard where he studied music and comparative religion. A 5-month fellowship took him to India, exposing you to greater depth between music and culture. And for five years, he's worked as an arranger and conductor in New York City. Today Crowley joins us on "Home Ground Radio."

Rock Climbing As A Path To Happiness And Meaning

Mar 13, 2016

Technology creates miraculous tools and toys. We're told a thousand times a day can achieve happiness and meaning by buying and using them. Yet for our 200,000 years on earth we have found those things through other means. What can climbing rocks possible have to do with that? Find out on this episode of "Home Ground Radio."

Pages