MTPR

Home Ground

Sunday 11:10 a.m. -11:40 a.m.

Home Ground Radio with Brian Kahn

Home Ground Radio is a half-hour public affairs program with topics that range from the environment to the politics of Montana and the rural west. In each program, host Brian Kahn conducts one or two in-depth interviews.

Home Ground Radio podcast

Ways to Connect

'Home Ground' Talks Healthcare Costs

May 12, 2016

You must have something that will cost between $35,000 and $50,000. But when you sign on the dotted line you don’t know what the bill will be or how good the product is. It sounds crazy, but you’ve just described much of the American medical system!

For more than 100 years, state fish and wildlife agencies have accepted the job of managing wildlife, usually but not exclusively those which are hunted for meat or trapped for fur. Managing in concept involves assessing and improving habitat, monitoring populations, setting seasons and bag limits on animals that can be taken - in short, allowing harvest while maintaining a health population. So imagine: you're supposed to manage wolverines. Mission impossible? Our guests today, who work for Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, talk about wolverines and the challenges around managing them.

What does it mean to speak a language? Fundamentally, it means you can communicate with another person.  Yet when the language is that of your Indian ancestors who go back to the mists of time it means that you carry that unique tradition.

'Home Ground': The Opiate Balancing Act

Mar 29, 2016

She faced unremitting, chronic pain — but no doctor would prescribe pain-killers that work. Why? Because they’re made from opium — a narcotic. So while doctors and police argued, she said to me calmly, "If this keeps up I will kill myself." On this episode of "Home Ground Radio" we'll hear first-hand about the problems chronic pain patients who rely on opiates face.

Music is universal to humankind, yet there are profound differences in music between cultures. Our guest today, Kurt Crowley, talked to us about the range of music and performance. He started playing piano in Montana at the age of 4, had a special talent. In eigth grade he got the prized Cook Scholarship to Saint Paul's Prep School. Then onto Harvard where he studied music and comparative religion. A 5-month fellowship took him to India, exposing you to greater depth between music and culture. And for five years, he's worked as an arranger and conductor in New York City. Today Crowley joins us on "Home Ground Radio."

Rock Climbing As A Path To Happiness And Meaning

Mar 13, 2016

Technology creates miraculous tools and toys. We're told a thousand times a day can achieve happiness and meaning by buying and using them. Yet for our 200,000 years on earth we have found those things through other means. What can climbing rocks possible have to do with that? Find out on this episode of "Home Ground Radio."

The Wilderness Act became law in 1964, enabling Congress to set aside land “where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.”  Few remember the days when timber mill unions and conservationists developed wilderness proposals and took together them to Congress. John Gatchell does, he's our guest on this episode of "Home Ground Radio." Part 2 of 2.

The Wilderness Act became law in 1964, enabling Congress to set aside land “where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.”  Few remember the days when timber mill unions and conservationists developed wilderness proposals and took together them to Congress. John Gatchell does. He's our guest on this episode of "Home Ground Radio." (Part 1 of 2.)

Our constitution gives us the right of privacy, yet it seems someone is monitoring our computer communications. Are they? Adrian Cohea, a systems analyst at the Montana Department of Revenue knows. He's today's guest on "Home Ground Radio"

The cost of fighting fires now consumes most of the Forest Service's tight budget, and sharp cuts in staff are one result. Can they still provide the stewardship the land needs? Dale Bosworth, former chief of the U.S. Forest Service shares his views on this episode of “Home Ground Radio”.

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