Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00 AM -9:00 AM
Steve Inskeep
Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep

Waking up is hard to do, but it’s easier with NPR’s Morning Edition.  Hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day’s stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts.  All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers.  In-depth stories explore topics like “digital generations” about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country’s Hidden Kitchens.  Morning Edition, it’s a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life. 

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Animals
1:01 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Where The Whale Sharks Go

A whale shark dives near the surface in waters off the coast of Mexico.
Marj Awai Georgia Aquarium

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 1:17 pm

Of all the creatures in the sea, one of the most majestic and mysterious is the whale shark. It's the biggest shark there is, 30 feet or more in length and weighing in at around 10 tons.

Among the mysteries is where this mighty fish migrates and where it gives birth. Now scientists have completed the biggest study ever of whale sharks, and they think they have some answers to those questions.

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It's All Politics
12:59 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Future Historians: Good Luck Sifting Through Obama Video

President Obama is seen on a video camera as he delivers a speech in Youngstown, Ohio, in 2010. In addition to footage of official events, the White House now has thousands of hours of behind-the-scenes video that it will archive.
Jeff Swensen Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:43 am

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Crime In The City
12:58 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Awaiting The Apocalypse In The Quiet Town Of Concord

Ben Winters wrote the best-selling Sense And Sensibility And Sea Monsters, as well as Bedbugs, Android Karenina and several books for kids. So far, he's published two books in the Last Policeman series.
Neda Ulaby NPR

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:43 am

No place seems safe these days from someone's terrifying, post-apocalyptic imaginings. Los Angeles is wrecked in the movie Elysium, the South is zombie-ridden in TV's The Walking Dead, and now— thanks to writer Ben Winters — even the quiet streets of Concord are at risk of annihilation.

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Business
12:41 am
Thu August 22, 2013

As Housing Recovers, Lots Of Boats Rise In U.S. Economy

A worker at the Cataumet Sawmill in Falmouth, Mass., where the improved housing outlook has led to more hours for employees.
Chris Arnold NPR

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 10:02 am

In just the past week we've seen a bunch of signs that the housing recovery is gaining steam. Data out Wednesday showed that existing-home sales rose to their highest level in nearly four years, while prices were up 14 percent from a year ago.

Retailers Home Depot and Lowe's both reported strong earnings growth and attributed that to the housing rebound.

And most important for the economy, homebuilders are hiring more workers and building more houses.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Thu August 22, 2013

'You're What I Wanted': Assembling The Family Stone

Sly & The Family Stone in Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y., in 1968. Left to right: Sly Stone, Cynthia Robinson, Freddie Stone, Rose Stone, Jerry Martini, Larry Graham.
Stephen Paley Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:43 am

"I think he was looking for good musicians, and he knew quite a few. He sees the heart of a person."

That's how Cynthia Robinson, founding member of Sly & The Family Stone, characterizes the charismatic frontman's choice of backing players. The band, which pioneered a blend of funk, soul, jazz and pop, began in 1960s San Francisco as a kind of blended family: black and white, men and women.

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NPR Story
9:06 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Bradley Manning Sentenced To 35 Years For Leaks

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Army Private Bradley Manning was sentenced this morning to 35 years in a military prison. The intelligence analyst shared hundreds of thousands of documents with the website WikiLeaks in what prosecutors call the biggest leak of classified information in U.S. history. The 25-year-old Manning stood at attention as his sentence was handed down in a courtroom in Fort Meade, Maryland.

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Middle East
6:54 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Syrian Government Accused In Gas Attacks On Civilians

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
6:17 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Lowes Reports Earnings On The Heels Of Home Depot

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Home Depot says it has had "one of the best quarters in its recent history." It credits the recovery in the housing market. Main rival Lowes also benefited from the housing recovery, and strong demand for home refurbishings.

Animals
5:28 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Donated Dog Blood Helps Give Cat Another Life

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. In New Zealand, dogs and cats have put aside their differences. When Rory the cat was brought to a vet last week after eating rat poison, he was on death's door and needed a blood transfusion fast. There was no time to get a donor match, so the vet took a risk and used blood from a doggie donor instead. The inter-species gamble paid off. Rory's owners report the cat is doing well and has shown no signs of wanting to play fetch. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:28 am
Wed August 21, 2013

Supreme Court Justices Aren't Email Savy

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

A lot of us will happily admit that we're not up on the latest tech trends. Among this group, nine very powerful men and women who like to wear black robes. Last night, Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan told a crowd, quote, "The Court hasn't really gotten into email." Yes, Kagan says the justices write memos on paper that looks like it came from the 19th century. And those papers are shuttled from office to office by law clerks. Guess it's one way to avoid spam.

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