The Write Question

Thursday 7:00 PM - 7:30 PM

The Write Question is a program that features authors from the western United States, including James Lee Burke, Maile Meloy, Thomas McGuane, Kim Barnes, Robert Wrigley, Jess Walter, Pam Houston, Barry Lopez, and hundreds of others.

The Write Question is produced by Montana Public Radio and also broadcast by Spokane Public Radio, KSJD transmitting to the Four Corners area from Cortez, CO, Yellowstone Public Radio, transmitting to eastern Montana and Northern Wyoming, KCMJ in Colorado Springs, and KGLT in Southwest Montana, as well as through the Public Radio Exchange.

Chérie Newman

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TWQ is supported by Humanities Montana - connecting kids to community, supporting vital cultural institutions, and encouraging community conversations - and by Public Radio Listeners.

The Write Question is produced by Chérie Newman. Executive producer, Michael Marsolek; studio engineer, Beth Anne Austein.

The music in some programs was written and performed by John Floridis.

The Given World, by Marian Palaia
Simon & Schuster

For a long time, Marian Palaia wrote short stories, instead of a novel. Not because she didn't want to write a whole book, but because she was terrified: "It was such a huge undertaking and I thought you had to know what you were doing... "

'Willow Wind'

Jul 25, 2016
Lost Horse Press

by Henry Real Bird

In the willow wind
the feeling will begin
Life, liberty, and death
Democracy in our breath
Born of the dew, and soil
in the heart of our soul

From the backwaters, still waters
Tears of war and joy victory covers,

San Francisco Bay-area photographer Sue Reynolds and American Indian poet Victor Charlo talk about their book, Still Here: Not Living in Tipis.

In this first collaborative photo-poetry book between a white urban photographer and a reservation Indian, Sue Reynolds' images and Salish poet Victor Charlo's poems tell a story of resurrection in the face of long odds. The book includes forty-five color photos and five Salish poems. A percentage of sales goes to American Indian College Fund.

'Sweetness'

Jul 18, 2016
Joe Pell

by Mark Gibbons

Raven struts
Down the sidewalk

Tasting
The air

Shakes its
Tuxedo tail

Dips to clean
The cement

Caws to another
Combing the grass

Hop-Roaming
The plaza

They dance
The Caw-ca-doodle-doo

Tango like
Dada-dandy

Blue-black
Crow sisters

Waddle bumping
Big breasts

In a hornpipe
Dead heat

For some sticky
Big Hunk

Candy
Wrapper

Delacorte Books for Young Readers

This is Logan, here to tell you about Going where it’s Dark, a book for young adult readers written by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor.

Going where it’s Dark by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor is a very exciting book, and I couldn’t put it down once I started reading it. The main character is Buck Anderson, a thirteen-year-old boy who struggles with problems, including bullying and stuttering. He overcomes the bullying problem but instead of learning how to not stutter, he learns how to not fight it and be able to stutter more easily.

cover image: Kim Heacox / Alaska Northwest Books

About Jimmy Bluefeather:

Old Keb Wisting is somewhere around ninety-five years old (he lost count awhile ago) and in constant pain and thinks he wants to die. He also thinks he thinks too much. Part Norwegian and part Tlingit Native (“with some Filipino and Portuguese thrown in”), he’s the last living canoe carver in the village of Jinkaat, in Southeast Alaska.

Seal Press

Overwhelmed with her fast-paced, competitive lifestyle, Amy Ragsdale moved with her husband, writer Peter Stark, and their two teenage children from the U.S. to a small town in northeastern Brazil, where she hoped they would learn the value of a slower life.

Lillian's Right to Vote: A Celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965

by Jonah Winter

illustrated by Shane W. Evans

Schwartz & Wade Books, 2015

Lillian is a 100 year-old African American woman standing at the bottom of a steep hill. “It's Voting Day, she's an American, and by God, she is going to vote.” As she walks slowly up the hill to the voting station, she remembers her great-great grandparents, who were slaves and her great-grandfather, who earned the right to vote with the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment in 1870. Then she recalls her Grandpa Isaac being charged a poll tax, and her Uncle Levi being forced to take bogus “tests” and being turned away from the polls when he couldn't answer the ridiculous questions.

Ruffleclaw

by Cornelia Funke

Random House Books for Young Readers, 2015

Ruffleclaw is the third in a series of books by Cornelia Funke which includes Emma and the Blue Genie and The Pirate Pig. This story tells the tale of an earth monster who lives under the shed in Tommy's family's yard. Unlike his neighbor earth monsters, whose burrows are filled with wood-lice and trash, Ruffleclaw loves all things human, and lines his home with sweaters and other trinkets stolen from humans over the years.

Mother Goose's Pajama Party 

by Danna Smith 

Illustrated by Virginia Allyn

Doubleday Books for Young Readers 2015

When my children were infants, I used to strap them in their carrier and go walking up the mountain that I live on, chanting nursery rhymes in rhythm with my steps. Back at home, while nursing, I would read through collections of nursery rhymes to brush up on the ones I learned as a child and discover the ones I missed.

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