The Write Question

Thursday 7:00 PM - 7:30 PM

The Write Question is a weekly literary program that features authors from the western United States, including James Lee Burke, Maile Meloy, Thomas McGuane, Kim Barnes, Robert Wrigley, Jess Walter, Pam Houston, Barry Lopez, and hundreds of others.

New host & producer Sarah Aronson takes the reins beginning August 17, 2017. Executive producer, Michael Marsolek; studio engineer, Beth Anne Austein. The music in some programs was written and performed by John Floridis. The Write Question was previously hosted & produced by Chérie Newman.

"I want to be on the same side as people who are drifting away from consumerism and towards a more meaningful life and I think that minimalism is a good, shall we say, gateway drug, because you can do with less. But some of the choices I find people claiming to be minimalist are actually just using more stuff and making their house look more pretty. I just want people to think harder and ask more difficult questions about where their stuff comes from. I want them to ask, “Where does my money come from and where does it go when I spend it?” Because that’s really what it’s all about. It’s not really about, “I’m only going to have 100 possessions.” If you have 100 possessions and one of them is a smart phone, then you’re using more carbon that 95% of the people on this planet. If you’re flying on airplanes, you’re not a minimalist. You can’t make that claim." 

Author Mark Sundeen discusses his book, "The Unsettlers: In Search of the Good Life in Today's America" on this episode of "The Write Question."

". . . I felt suffocated by the amount of strictly Montanan writing. I have never gone fishing or camping, had just begun to hike, and while I loved nature, I wasn’t overwhelmingly inspired by all the A River Runs Through It-esque literature." -- Emma Mcmullen

"The point I was at when I was writing a lot of these stories, let’s face it, I was in my mid to late twenties. I had a cheating heart, still do. That personal aspect of it, I think, most of the men I know, it’s something they’ve struggled with in their life, so to make it any other way would not be true to my reality. In a collection of stories I do think you have a duty to try to show your breadth as a writer and so as a criticism it’s pretty legit because if I am portraying a certain aspect of my characters in a repetitive manner, that’s something I definitely don’t want to do. So I would probably agree with your assessment of that, which is one of the things I did like about my decision to put a longer story at the end from a female perspective just to kind of show I’m more than maybe just a one-trick pony. Hopefully." -- Callan Wink

"You don’t really know a place until you have seen the heartbreak behind it, and sometimes that heartbreak makes the picture a little less pretty. . . The confines of my small town, the heaviness of the stories of the people within it, was something I thought I could erase if I ran far enough away. " -- Elsie Wipplinger

The Colorado River is an essential resource for a surprisingly large part of the United States, and every gallon that flows down it is owned or claimed by someone. David Owen traces all that water from the Colorado’s headwaters to its parched terminus, once a verdant wetland but now a million-acre desert. He takes readers on an adventure downriver, along a labyrinth of waterways, reservoirs, power plants, farms, fracking sites, ghost towns, and RV parks, to the spot near the U.S.–Mexico border where the river runs dry. Learn more from David Owen on this episode of The Write Question.