MTPR

Andrea Jones

The Yellowstone River from Livingston, MT.
J. Stephen Conn (CC-BY-NC-2)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Montana wildlife officials are conducting tests on fish from additional areas to see if they are infected with a disease blamed in a massive fish kill in the Yellowstone River.

State officials closed a 183-mile stretch of the Yellowstone to all recreational activities on Friday. The unprecedented move came after thousands of fish were killed by a disease spread by a microscopic parasite.

ontana Fish, Wildlife and Parks closed about 180 miles of the Yellowstone River downstream from Yellowstone National Park without a timeline for reopening. The closure could last months.
Wormwould (CC-BY-NC-2)

A microscopic parasite killing tens of thousands of fish forced state wildlife officials to close a portion of the Yellowstone River Friday morning.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks closed about 180 miles of the Yellowstone River downstream from Yellowstone National Park without a timeline for reopening. The closure could last months.

Mountain whitefish.
(PD)

Montana wildlife officials are expanding their search for further signs of a massive fish kill in the Yellowstone River. Over 1,000 dead mountain whitefish have been counted so far.

A Campaign To End Big Game 'Crowd Shooting'

Mar 27, 2015
Public Domain

Two mass elk shootings in November and December that angered many in Montana have prompted a hunting group to launch an ethical hunting campaign.

Mike England is with the Bozeman-based Citizens’ Advisory Committee, a public group that gives feedback to Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks. His says the irresponsible behavior of the hunters who surrounded and shot into elk herds last last year near Helena motivated his group to move from advice to action.

lowjumpingfrog/flickr

National Park Service officials are announcing a partnership with the state of Montana to consider changes to managing bison in and around Yellowstone National Park.

Hundreds of bison wander into the state from the park’s northern boundary during many winters.

Livestock owners worry about the animals damaging property and spreading disease.

The Park Service and the state have been operating under their current Bison Management Plan since 2001.

The agencies think it may be time for an update.