MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Caroline Keys

For fans of creativity, this one's a twofer: “Musician’s Spotlight” host John Floridis and “The Write Question” host Sarah Aronson team up for an hour-long exploration of how music, sound and the written word connect in obvious and hidden ways.  Caroline Keys, an accomplished musician and writing teacher from western Montana, joins Sarah and John.

Do Bobcats Kill Deer? 'Field Notes' Investigates

Oct 16, 2017
Bobcat kittens
Summer M. Tribble (CC-BY-SA)

Bobcats are relatively common in patchy habitats all across the U.S., but we don’t see them often because they are crepuscular or nocturnal and well camouflaged. But after a recent bobcat sighting, I'll be on the lookout for bobcats much more than I have before.

Danica Winters: archaeologist; award-winning writer; author of many published books and short stories; marketing and social media guru; founder of a digital publishing services company; sought-after speaker; wife; mother of two. If you think Danica sounds like a superwoman or the heroine of a Harlequin romance novel, you're right. Almost.

Winters is a Montanan and writer for Harlequin. She's a partner at Self Publishing Services, a company with 30 contract employees, and she runs her self-publishing empire from Frenchtown, Montana.

In this episode of "Can Do: Lessons From Savvy Montana Entrepreneurs," Danica Winters joins host Arnie Sherman to share lessons she learned as she developed her writing career and self-publishing service.

One/ Pushkin

"There is a Russian-roulette effect to the storytelling that will keep readers turning the page ... impressive, focusing on life's contradictions and absurdities." -- Irish Times

Golden Islands Of The Western Montana Forest

Oct 8, 2017
Golden islands of western larch in the Gold Creek area near Missoula.
Josh Burnham (CC-BY-2)

Sitting on the shores of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park last fall, gazing up at the surrounding hillside, I was struck by a unique mosaic of golden splendor against the evergreen background. The largest of its species, the western larch, Larix occidentalis, is indeed a unique kind of tree.

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