Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Elizabeth Sullivan

"It was in February of 2006. My younger brother and best friend had drunk himself to death, I’d written a novel that no one liked, I was in this huge business dispute that had us on the verge of personal bankruptcy, and driving on a snowy Montana afternoon . . . I realized I was worth more dead than alive." -- Mark Sullivan

Snow Fleas

Every autumn I begin to wonder – where do all the bugs go? Unlike people, and other warm-blooded critters that can maintain a consistent internal temperature, insects cannot. So, you might wonder, what do insects do to survive the cold?

“If you act, you’ll either fail and learn, or you’ll succeed. Either one is productive and useful. If you don’t act, nothing happens.”

That’s Shane Beams, the owner and chief engineer of Vision Aerial, a Montana company focused on designing and producing a new generation of affordable, commercial unmanned drones.

On this episode of  Can Do: Lessons from Savvy Montana Entrepreneurs, Shane describes the trajectory of his business, and the trends and issues in the burgeoning drone industry.

Once I entered the poems, hers was the only world I was certain of. Each poem reads almost like a chapter in a novel. There is softness, strength, and sureness in Rosie’s tellings. Try to stop after reading and savoring just one poem; go ahead, I dare you! —Patrice Vecchione, Step into Nature: Nurturing Imagination and Spirit in Everyday Life 

'Field Notes' Talks Turkey

Nov 20, 2017
Although never native to Montana, turkeys were introduced here in the 1950s when national conservation efforts were mounted to save the species.

In those early days of the young republic, hunters would come back with reports of seeing a 1,000 turkeys in one day, often in flocks of as many as 200 birds. Yet from an estimated population of perhaps 10 million, the numbers of wild turkeys dwindled as unrestricted hunting increased and their woodland habitat was cleared to make way for homesteaders. By the 1940s there were only some 30,000 wild turkeys left in a fraction of their former range.