MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Bitterroot flowers Along the Nez Perce National Historic Trail, Lolo, MT.
U.S. Forest Service (PD)

Enter the high country of Montana in late May or early June and you may see a striking pale pink flower. Few plants can rival the lovely bloom of the bitterroot, a low-growing perennial herb with a blossom that ranges from deep rose to almost white.

The bitterroot grows on the dry slopes of the Rockies, ranging from southern British Columbia and Alberta to the high-altitude deserts of New Mexico and Arizona.

"The mountains have an intrinsic value: hunters, fisherman, hikers, and people that just want to drive by and see them out of their window. The mountains have this aesthetic protection but the desert is much more fragile and much more under siege by mining companies and petroleum companies. . . " -- Jack Clinton

All About Growing Pains: Dr. Starbuck Explains

May 30, 2018

Hi! I’m Dr. Jamison Starbuck, a naturopathic family physician. I’m here today with growing pain health tips.

After a day of playing and running around, have you noticed that your legs are crampy? Maybe in the evening your legs have hurt so bad that it seems you might not be able to sleep.

These are growing pains. They happen in three specific areas: the front of your thighs, behind your knees and in your calves. They start at the end of a day, after lots of activity. They can even wake you up when you are sleeping.

Raising Chickens Locally: The Future Of Agriculture?

May 28, 2018

As the nutritional quality of food declines and monoculture agriculture grows, many Americans have few options for healthy, locally grown food. Main Street Project aims to change that.

Ceanothus: Life From The Kiss Of Fire

May 26, 2018
Ceanothus velutinus, a plant with more common names than zip codes in California.
Walter Siegmund (CC-BY-SA-3)

Thirty-plus years ago when I was studying wildlife management at Oregon State University, we learned that Ceanothus was a highly preferred forage plant for deer and elk during the winter. I knew that Ceanothus was the genus name of a large group of western shrubs and I even knew enough to recognize a few of the individual species back then.

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