MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

"... We can never understand how a group might do something that goes against its own best interest, but women were influenced by their husbands and their fathers and then they really did believe — I mean there were strong beliefs — that a woman’s place was in the home, and they don’t need to vote, and they have influence through their husbands or their men who can vote, and that’s enough." -- Beth Judy

Author Beth Judy talks about her book "Bold Women In Montana History" on this episode of "The Write Question."

Rough-legged hawk
FLICKR USER, FRANK D. LOSPALLUTO (CC-BY-2.0)

As winter comes to the National Wildlife Refuges of the Mission Valley, we begin to see a whole different group of visitors. And I’m not just referring to the human kind. Strange as it may seem, the National Bison Range, Ninepipes National Wildlife Refuge and Pablo National Wildlife Refuge, along with other lands in the Mission Valley, are where a number of birds choose to spend their winter.

The Scott family continues to run the publicly traded, 120 office, six state, $12 billion First Interstate Bank system out of Billings, Montana as if it was still a small town bank. On this episode of "Can Do," James Scott, Jr., grandson of First Interstate Bank founder Homer Scott and son of chairman James Scott, Sr., talks about the history of the bank, as well as who and what the bank finances and invests in, and how you can succeed in today's competitive landscape.

"You have to judge people in the era in which they lived, not by today’s standards, and realize that Ernest Hemingway was an extraordinarily complicated person. He was very shy, he was a bookworm, he was a bore, he was a bully, he was the best friend you’d ever have, and not the best friend you’d ever had. But the overriding thing you come away with when you talk to people who knew Ernest, or lived with Ernest, like Valerie Hemingway, was that he was the most fascinating person you’d ever be around." Hemingway: The Bully, The Bore, And The Best Friend Keith McCafferty

"There are no survivors of this war [WWI] at this time, so we need to be reminded of this particular history," says Barbara Koostra, the executive director of the Montana Museum of Art & Culture.

"We are honored to honor veterans and the history of our country and world with "Over There: Montanans in the Great War,"  Koostra says.

She joins UM Professor of Art History and Criticism Rafael Chacón for a look at the exhibition focusing on experiences of individuals from Montana during World War I.

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