MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

An Excerpt From SHOT IN MONTANA, by Brian D'Ambrosio

Feb 17, 2017
Riverbend Publishing

Montana is a realistic feast for filmmakers. It is not surprising that Hollywood selected Glacier National Park as the mythical setting to depict heaven in the 1998 Robin Williams movie, “What Dreams May Come.” Filmmakers captured the surreal beauty of one of the world’s greatest treasures so vividly that critic Roger Ebert declared “What Dreams May Come” as “one of the great visual achievements in film history.”

Threshold Episode 03: Born Free

Feb 16, 2017

Many cattle ranchers view wild bison as a threat to their livelihoods. But some think cattle and bison can coexist. On episode three of Threshold, you'll meet two cattle ranchers with different perspectives on wild bison — and, we'll take you on a controversial bison hunt.

Martin Klimek (CC-BY-4.0). Courtesy of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

"One of the central tenets of collaborative comedy writing is the rule of 'Yes, and,'" writes freelance writer and occasional standup comedian, Sarah Aswell. "The concept is simple: when someone has an idea, you should not only validate that idea no matter its absurdity (by saying 'Yes') but you also add something new to the scene (by saying 'and').

Western Writers Write The West

Feb 15, 2017
University of Texas Press

What does it mean to be a westerner? With all the mythology that has grown up about the American West, is it even possible to describe "how it was, how it is, here, in the West--just that," in the words of Lynn Stegner? Starting with that challenge, Stegner and Russell Rowland invited several dozen members of the western literary tribe to write about living in the West and being a western writer in particular.

'Love Song'

Feb 13, 2017
Kumar

by Danell Jones

I'm overeasy for you —

After four hardboiled decades
you glaze my heart
icing dissolving on my tongue

Call me your sweet, your dariole, your bonfemme

You'll be my crown roast, my deep dish, my potatoes O'Brien

You'll be my always

my cupful

my round

my fill

Faking Meat, The Chinese Way

Feb 12, 2017
Flickr user, Cory Doctorow (CC-BY-2.0)

From his travels in China, Food Guy Greg Patent reports that scientists there have for decades been perfecting the art of fake meat. Not only can they duplicate the flavor of duck, pork, chicken and fish - all from soy protein - they also create authentic color and texture, down to which direction the fake meat fibers run.

Super Heroes Invade Sugarbeet Falls

Feb 10, 2017

Excerpt from Sugartbeet Falls, Volume 1:  Fantastic Friends, by Ryan A. Arca

Pops walked through the door carrying an ancient-looking chest that appeared to be older than both Xander’s grandpas combined. It looked like it weighed about half a ton, even in Pops’s long, strong arms.

“What the heck is that?” Xander asked, gaping.

Mariana Cook

"When I meet strangers deep in rural white settings, perfect and polite English rolls easily from my face and I watch their eyes and brains appraise me," writes Alex Alviar, who teaches at Salish Kootenai College and with the Missoula Writing Collaborative. "Where is he from? Indian? Tourist? Mexican? Their eyes are like fish in the murk considering the fake fly tied and cast through the ripple before them. What is he? Can we trust him?

Threshold Episode 02: 'The Red Man Was Pressed'

Feb 9, 2017

How did we go from more than 50 million wild bison to just 23 free-roaming animals? And how does the decimation of the herds relate to the oppression of Native Americans? Find out on this episode of Threshold.

The Battle To Control Nature In National Parks

Feb 8, 2017
Penguin Random House

The fascinating story of a trial that opened a window onto the century-long battle to control nature in the national parks.

When twenty-five-year-old Harry Walker was killed by a bear in Yellowstone Park in 1972, the civil trial prompted by his death became a proxy for bigger questions about American wilderness management that had been boiling for a century. At immediate issue was whether the Park Service should have done more to keep bears away from humans, but what was revealed as the trial unfolded was just how fruitless our efforts to regulate nature in the parks had always been. 

Pages