MTPR

Arts & Culture

Author interviews, food, natural history, poetry, and more from "The Write Question", "The Food Guys", "Field Notes", "Home Ground Radio", "Front Row Center", and "Reflections West".

Riverbend Publishing

In these stories, Patterson explores what it is to grow up female in the American West. As her narratives reveal the lives of travelers, homemakers, radio show announcers, mothers, teachers, dancers, shop clerks, and the subterranean world of girls, they take the reader from a ferry dock in Resurrection Bay, Alaska, to a two-room school in the Bitterroot Valley, from brash, backpacking college students to young new mothers on the edge, from the 1920s to the 1990s. In Ballet at the Moose Lodge, Patterson explores in delicate and searing prose the visible and invisible negotiations women make to navigate lives bound by the rugged western landscape.

Singing In The Snow: Montana's Winter Bird Songs

Feb 11, 2018
Flickr user, Jason Crotty (CC-BY-2.0)

If you go cross-country skiing in the North American woods, you’re likely to hear all manner of twittering and chattering as flocks of birds like chickadees, finches, and nuthatches bustle about finding food and warning each other about danger. Most birds will call like this at any time of year, but reserve singing for signaling a territory or attracting mates during the breeding season, typically in spring.

Nicole Hagerman Miller.
Courtesy Biomimicry 3.8

“I think focus is such a fundamental key for any startup, because so much opportunity comes along that you’ve got to know where you’re going,” says Nicole Hagerman Miller, the managing director of Biomimicry 3.8. The Missoula-based company, which grew out of Janine Benyus' 1997 award-winning book, “Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature,” creates strategies for business based on functions found in nature.

On this episode of “Can Do,” Nicole talks about the the lessons she has learned while managing a startup whose product is a bit esoteric.

"Why do you have to turn in your feminist card if you want both [a strong, chivalrous man and an independent life] and why can’t you have both?" -- Jennifer Ryan

Flickr user, Mark Nesbitt (CC-BY-2.0)

The Food Guys take a couple of shows to talk about einkorn, the ancient predecessor to modern wheat. Einkorn (rhymes with “fine corn”) means “one grain” in German. As with other ancient grains that have become trendy, the gluten structure of einkorn seems to suit some people better than that of modern bread wheat, Triticum aestivum. Einkorn boosters point out that, compared to bread wheat, it's low in starch and high in protein, and tastes nutty and earthy.

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